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To bring a divided country together, start with a little spit (DNA test)

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posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 12:01 AM
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a reply to: seasonal

These tests are such BS.

There is no such thing as a genetic marker for judaism. That is so offensive a notion. Sure, in the US the Supreme Court has ruled that in they eyes if the law (the anti-discriminatory laws to be exact), Judaism is to be considered a race - but that is semantics, not genetics.

If a DNA test tells you that you are "2 percent Jewish" you can throw it in the trash and consider yourself conned.

And never mind that there is no genetic marker for judaism to begin with, if there were, it would in no way be as clear cut is that. And what do they mean, when they say "15% German"? As if there was a German genome, or as if Germans were this homogenous group that have lived in isolation for millennia. Come on! That is sooo 1940'sh!

Sigh.

2 percent Jewish my ass.


edit on 30-12-2016 by DupontDeux because: (no reason given)




posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 12:02 AM
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Quick, everybody go upload your DNA to Google's 23andMe so they can hand it over to the DNA databank, and after enough lobbying they'll have your DNA searchable on Google (which they're on record saying is their desire) with your abnormalities and junk size for all the world to see.
edit on 30-12-2016 by IgnoranceIsntBlisss because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 12:02 AM
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What are they looking for?

Super blood. RH null. It's basically acceptable by anyone I think. I had to look it up, I've searched before but failed miserably... A teacher told me about the first case (aboriginal 1960's) but I never got round to looking it up properly.

RH NULL

It's possible anyways, who knows...

Only about 40 cases of it have been discovered, people... Not cases of blood lying around


Fascinating stuff really, just thought I'd throw it out there.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 12:37 AM
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a reply to: RAY1990

Good throw!



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 01:51 AM
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originally posted by: VictorVonDoom
Every since the Iraq War began, there seems to be a push to get people to put their DNA on record. Maybe I'm just overly conspiracy minded, but it seems suspicious to me.

OK, I am overly conspiracy minded. But still ...


Military has been taking DNA samples from its members long before Iraq/AStan.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 02:03 AM
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a reply to: VictorVonDoom

Just because you're paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you.


I do agree it is suspicious and would not supply a sample, I do like the concept the OP has posted.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 02:06 AM
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a reply to: DAVID64

I see the point you're expressing, but there's more reason for someone to identify one way or another than blood quotients.

For example, I am (part) Maidu. It's a tribe in northern California. My (paternal) grandmother was 5/8. I'm not exactly sure if the blood quotient is divided in exactly half per generation or if there is another way to determine; nevertheless, I readily admit that that part of my heritage is just that...a part. My tribe put in the constitution that anyone who is blood related by birth to one of the (four) original charters is a full lineal tribal member, eligible to receive full benefit and membership in the federally-recognized tribe. Not all tribes operate by such principles - many do.

However, I have been exposed to the culture and take part in tribal business in whatever capacity I can.

To look at me, you would assume "white guy" (of nationality you couldn't quite place), yet there is clearly more to the picture than meets the eye. I just also happen to believe that these things should be taken with a dose of humility - I typically don't wear it on my sleeve...not leastly because lots of people fall over themselves romanticizing (patronizing) a culture they don't really begin to understand.
edit on 30-12-2016 by MiddleInitial because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 02:13 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse

There are Finn jokes?



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 02:43 AM
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originally posted by: DupontDeux
a reply to: seasonal

These tests are such BS.

There is no such thing as a genetic marker for judaism. That is so offensive a notion. Sure, in the US the Supreme Court has ruled that in they eyes if the law (the anti-discriminatory laws to be exact), Judaism is to be considered a race - but that is semantics, not genetics.

If a DNA test tells you that you are "2 percent Jewish" you can throw it in the trash and consider yourself conned.

And never mind that there is no genetic marker for judaism to begin with, if there were, it would in no way be as clear cut is that. And what do they mean, when they say "15% German"? As if there was a German genome, or as if Germans were this homogenous group that have lived in isolation for millennia. Come on! That is sooo 1940'sh!

Sigh.

2 percent Jewish my ass.



23&me has a distinct ancestor group known as Ashkenazi jew. There are also special genetic panels done, because there are a few genetic diseases that are extremely common in these jews, while they are very rare in the normal population.
why does this bother you so much?



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 02:53 AM
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While there's a point to quell division. However, having tests results in databases, are ripe for abuse. These companies who offer the tests use the databases to compare and compile demographic areas to have results such as 20% German. Some offer Neanderthal percentages.



originally posted by: DupontDeux
a reply to: seasonal

These tests are such BS.

There is no such thing as a genetic marker for judaism. That is so offensive a notion. Sure, in the US the Supreme Court has ruled that in they eyes if the law (the anti-discriminatory laws to be exact), Judaism is to be considered a race - but that is semantics, not genetics.

If a DNA test tells you that you are "2 percent Jewish" you can throw it in the trash and consider yourself conned.

And never mind that there is no genetic marker for judaism to begin with, if there were, it would in no way be as clear cut is that. And what do they mean, when they say "15% German"? As if there was a German genome, or as if Germans were this homogenous group that have lived in isolation for millennia. Come on! That is sooo 1940'sh!

Sigh.

2 percent Jewish my ass.




Advanced genetic testing, including Y-DNA and mtDNA haplotyping, of modern Jewish communities around the world, has helped to determine which of the communities are likely to descend from the Israelites and which are not, as well as to establish the degrees of separation between the groups. Important studies archived here include the University College London study of 2002, Ariella Oppenheim's study of 2001, Ariella Oppenheim's study of 2000, Michael Hammer's study of 2000, Doron Behar's study of 2008, Steven Bray's study of 2010, and others.

Key findings:
The main ethnic element of Ashkenazim (German and Eastern European Jews), Sephardim (Spanish and Portuguese Jews), Mizrakhim (Middle Eastern Jews), Juhurim (Mountain Jews of the Caucasus), Italqim (Italian Jews), and most other modern Jewish populations of the world is Israelite.

The Israelite haplotypes fall into Y-DNA haplogroups J and E. Ashkenazim also descend, in a smaller way, from European peoples from the northern Mediterranean region (including Italians and French) and even less from Slavs. We know most of the European ancestry came from women who married into the community since the Ashkenazic haplogroups of European origin are usually mtDNA rather than Y-DNA. Unexpectedly, most Ashkenazim have a tiny fraction of East Asian ancestry.

Their typically East Asian mtDNA haplogroups include M33c1 and N9a3. The characteristically East Asian hair thickness allele 1540C for the EDAR gene is carried by about 1.7% of Ashkenazim.

Source- khazaria.com



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: seasonal

Maybe that also, but that's child's play. What if the one world government decided to eliminate every person with a cell of African in them? And everyone with any type of a certain precursor. It will be easy to identify and find these people.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: reldra

That's what CRT does. It tells you if you're white, you have privilege no matter your circumstance because you live in a system created by whites that is automatically designed to give whites privilege and oppress minorities.

That's why whites are always racist even when they aren't in this country and why no minority even can be. The system gives you power and takes all of theirs away.

Intersectionalism grew out of that. It claims to explore how everyone's different status groups intersect with their different oppression. So basically what you do is draw a Venn diagram with your different status group and where they all intersect is where "you" live. You might have something in common with someone who inhabits a same status group, but if they don't inhabit all of yours, they truly can't understand you all the way, only what you have in common with your status group.

It further carves up and subdivides people into smaller victim class units to create ever more grievances and grievance groups.

It's a lovely system the left has for creating special gripe and whine groups.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 11:01 AM
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originally posted by: seasonal
DNA test for a college to find out what your roots are. It's a novel approach to help people recognize that there is a lot of different nationalities that may have been in your ancestry. Seems like a good way to get people to see race from a different perspective. After the last 8 years of worsening "race relation" could programs like this help to bring people together?

Anita Foreman's students took DNA tests to learn there roots.


Anita Foeman’s students had just gotten the results from their genetic tests, and they couldn’t wait to talk.

One said her dad cheered when she told him she has Zulu roots. A girl with curly red hair said her family always gathers around a Nativity scene on Christmas Eve and sings carols over the baby Jesus, and this year, after learning that she’s 1 percent Jewish, she said: “We’re going to sing the dreidel song!”
www.washingtonpost.com... bc69

Foreman students are talking about race, immigration, terrorist attacks, building walls, riots, and the election. So the answer Foreman thought would be to take DNA tests to provoke people to recognize their own biases, and this would help pull them together. Foreman says that this really opens up the dialog and surprises people.


At a time when tensions over race and politics are so raw, the stakes, Foeman said, seem particularly high. Her students have been talking all fall about riots, building walls, terrorist attacks, immigration, the election. “You can feel it buzzing around the halls like electricity,” Foeman said.

Asking people to take DNA tests — an idea that has spread to a campuswide effort at this public university — grew out of consulting work Foeman does in race mediation. Instead of a confrontational approach, trying to provoke people into recognizing their own biases, she wanted something that would pull people together, or at least give them a neutral place from which to start to talk. And with racial divides so stark, she wanted to add some nuance and depth.


The news isn't all good. Some people are so connected to what they think is their racial ID is that they drop the class and some refuse to take it because they don't want to know if they are not pure. Seems like a new approach.


Foreman has seen people drop out of the project after getting their results, including three people who identified as African American who were upset to find out how much European ancestry they had. Some people refuse to take the test. One woman of Chinese descent told Foeman, “It’s okay for you — you already know you’re mixed up. I don’t want to find out I’m not pure.”

And some people resist some of the findings, like the student who insisted he just tans easily.


I see a flaw. THERE ARE NO RACES BUT ONE. its ETNICITIES. they need to start saying ETHNICITIES.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 02:02 PM
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originally posted by: dreamingawake
While there's a point to quell division. However, having tests results in databases, are ripe for abuse. These companies who offer the tests use the databases to compare and compile demographic areas to have results such as 20% German. Some offer Neanderthal percentages.



originally posted by: DupontDeux
a reply to: seasonal

These tests are such BS.

There is no such thing as a genetic marker for judaism. That is so offensive a notion. Sure, in the US the Supreme Court has ruled that in they eyes if the law (the anti-discriminatory laws to be exact), Judaism is to be considered a race - but that is semantics, not genetics.

If a DNA test tells you that you are "2 percent Jewish" you can throw it in the trash and consider yourself conned.

And never mind that there is no genetic marker for judaism to begin with, if there were, it would in no way be as clear cut is that. And what do they mean, when they say "15% German"? As if there was a German genome, or as if Germans were this homogenous group that have lived in isolation for millennia. Come on! That is sooo 1940'sh!

Sigh.

2 percent Jewish my ass.




Advanced genetic testing, including Y-DNA and mtDNA haplotyping, of modern Jewish communities around the world, has helped to determine which of the communities are likely to descend from the Israelites and which are not, as well as to establish the degrees of separation between the groups. Important studies archived here include the University College London study of 2002, Ariella Oppenheim's study of 2001, Ariella Oppenheim's study of 2000, Michael Hammer's study of 2000, Doron Behar's study of 2008, Steven Bray's study of 2010, and others.

Key findings:
The main ethnic element of Ashkenazim (German and Eastern European Jews), Sephardim (Spanish and Portuguese Jews), Mizrakhim (Middle Eastern Jews), Juhurim (Mountain Jews of the Caucasus), Italqim (Italian Jews), and most other modern Jewish populations of the world is Israelite.

The Israelite haplotypes fall into Y-DNA haplogroups J and E. Ashkenazim also descend, in a smaller way, from European peoples from the northern Mediterranean region (including Italians and French) and even less from Slavs. We know most of the European ancestry came from women who married into the community since the Ashkenazic haplogroups of European origin are usually mtDNA rather than Y-DNA. Unexpectedly, most Ashkenazim have a tiny fraction of East Asian ancestry.

Their typically East Asian mtDNA haplogroups include M33c1 and N9a3. The characteristically East Asian hair thickness allele 1540C for the EDAR gene is carried by about 1.7% of Ashkenazim.

Source- khazaria.com


See, no mention of a Jewish marker.

They DNA-tested people from different Jewish communities to see which have the most in common with the taxon that is caucasian semites. They then (understandably) reasoned that that would tell which community has the most in common with the ancient Israelites too.

But that is not to say that "Jewish" equates to "Israelite".

You can convert into Judaism, and people have done so for millennia, and you are by most accounts considered 100% Jewish if your mother is Jewish, even though your father may be Catholic. You would, on the other hand, not be considered 100% Asian if your mother is black.

Judaism is about culture, not genetics.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: rickymouse

LOL i wonder if we are related then ... maybe you are more Finn than i am .. who knows.



posted on Dec, 30 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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originally posted by: dollukka
a reply to: rickymouse

LOL i wonder if we are related then ... maybe you are more Finn than i am .. who knows.


My grandfather and great grandparents lived around Oulu. On both sides of the family. That would be lower Lapland area. I thought I was part Sweede, but I don't have hardly any of that in me. It seems that the guys from that area went to the town right over the boarder and would marry a swede girl. The girls did the same thing, went across and got a Swede husband. I guess in that area where across the boarder they were all Finnish people, not real swedes. I have a couple of conditions the Lap Swedes and Lap Finns have. No problem if you know about these things, The traditional Finnish diet does not include foods that trigger these conditions. But here in America we are taught to eat things we should avoid.

What part of Finland are you from?



posted on Dec, 31 2016 @ 01:47 AM
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originally posted by: DupontDeux

originally posted by: dreamingawake
While there's a point to quell division. However, having tests results in databases, are ripe for abuse. These companies who offer the tests use the databases to compare and compile demographic areas to have results such as 20% German. Some offer Neanderthal percentages.



originally posted by: DupontDeux
a reply to: seasonal

These tests are such BS.

There is no such thing as a genetic marker for judaism. That is so offensive a notion. Sure, in the US the Supreme Court has ruled that in they eyes if the law (the anti-discriminatory laws to be exact), Judaism is to be considered a race - but that is semantics, not genetics.

If a DNA test tells you that you are "2 percent Jewish" you can throw it in the trash and consider yourself conned.

And never mind that there is no genetic marker for judaism to begin with, if there were, it would in no way be as clear cut is that. And what do they mean, when they say "15% German"? As if there was a German genome, or as if Germans were this homogenous group that have lived in isolation for millennia. Come on! That is sooo 1940'sh!

Sigh.

2 percent Jewish my ass.




Advanced genetic testing, including Y-DNA and mtDNA haplotyping, of modern Jewish communities around the world, has helped to determine which of the communities are likely to descend from the Israelites and which are not, as well as to establish the degrees of separation between the groups. Important studies archived here include the University College London study of 2002, Ariella Oppenheim's study of 2001, Ariella Oppenheim's study of 2000, Michael Hammer's study of 2000, Doron Behar's study of 2008, Steven Bray's study of 2010, and others.

Key findings:
The main ethnic element of Ashkenazim (German and Eastern European Jews), Sephardim (Spanish and Portuguese Jews), Mizrakhim (Middle Eastern Jews), Juhurim (Mountain Jews of the Caucasus), Italqim (Italian Jews), and most other modern Jewish populations of the world is Israelite.

The Israelite haplotypes fall into Y-DNA haplogroups J and E. Ashkenazim also descend, in a smaller way, from European peoples from the northern Mediterranean region (including Italians and French) and even less from Slavs. We know most of the European ancestry came from women who married into the community since the Ashkenazic haplogroups of European origin are usually mtDNA rather than Y-DNA. Unexpectedly, most Ashkenazim have a tiny fraction of East Asian ancestry.

Their typically East Asian mtDNA haplogroups include M33c1 and N9a3. The characteristically East Asian hair thickness allele 1540C for the EDAR gene is carried by about 1.7% of Ashkenazim.

Source- khazaria.com


See, no mention of a Jewish marker.

They DNA-tested people from different Jewish communities to see which have the most in common with the taxon that is caucasian semites. They then (understandably) reasoned that that would tell which community has the most in common with the ancient Israelites too.

But that is not to say that "Jewish" equates to "Israelite".

You can convert into Judaism, and people have done so for millennia, and you are by most accounts considered 100% Jewish if your mother is Jewish, even though your father may be Catholic. You would, on the other hand, not be considered 100% Asian if your mother is black.

Judaism is about culture, not genetics.


See, there are actually. Look more into the site. It shares other genetics as well. There are noted haplotype "markers". Which is part of " accounts considered 100% Jewish if your mother is Jewish".
Example:

"Based on surveys of Jewish cemetery gravestones, priests represent approximately 5% of the estimated total male world Jewish population of roughly 7 million.... We identified six haplotypes, whose frequencies are shown in the table (YAP+ DYS19A-E and YAP+ DYS19, all alleles.) Applying the x2 test to the frequencies of the T-chromosome haplotypes distinguishes priests from the lay population. The most striking difference was in the frequency of YAP+ chromosomes among compares to lay Jews. Only 1.5% of Y-chromosomes among priests were YAP+, in comparison to a frequency of 18.4% in lay Jews. In contrast, we found no significant difference in the distribution of alleles for the non-Y-chromosomes locus polymorphism D1S191. (data not shown). These Y-chromosome haplotype differences confirm a distinct paternal genealogy for Jewish priests... This result is consistent with an origin for the Jewish priesthood antedating the division of world Jewry into Ashkenazi and Sephardic communities, and is of particular interest in view of the pronounced genetic diversity displayed between the two [Sephardic and Ashkenazic] communities."


Source



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