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Does Anyone Still Make Their Own Bread?

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posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Well I don't really do measurements and tend to haphazardly throw everything into a bowl but to kinda vaguely narrow it down:

1 cup of flour
1 tablespoon yeast
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt
Some warm water to mix
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon Greek yogurt
1 cup grated halloumi cheese

Throw all the dry ingredients except the halloumi into the bowl, mix a bit, add the yogurt and oil then slowly add the warm water and bring it all together to form a dough, knead by hand on a floured surface for 10 mins then cover bowl with a teatowel and leave to stand for an hour, take it out and knead for another 10 mins, leave for another hour.

Punch the dough down to get all the air out then roll it out on a floured surface until it's thin enough to see your hand through, sprinkle the Halloumi into one half then fold it over. Place on a hot, dry skillet for about 30 secs then flip over and repeat.

Naans are pretty similar but need to be rolled out a bit thicker, the ingredients and method are basically the same just without halloumi. If you have access to a tandoor or have a big stone you can cook on they'll turn out much better.




posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 03:29 PM
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edit on 17-10-2016 by MagnaCarta2015 because: sorry double post



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 03:42 PM
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originally posted by: MagnaCarta2015
a reply to: Atsbhct

Well I don't really do measurements and tend to haphazardly throw everything into a bowl but to kinda vaguely narrow it down:

1 cup of flour
1 tablespoon yeast
1 teaspoon sugar
1 teaspoon salt
Some warm water to mix
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon Greek yogurt
1 cup grated halloumi cheese

Throw all the dry ingredients except the halloumi into the bowl, mix a bit, add the yogurt and oil then slowly add the warm water and bring it all together to form a dough, knead by hand on a floured surface for 10 mins then cover bowl with a teatowel and leave to stand for an hour, take it out and knead for another 10 mins, leave for another hour.

Punch the dough down to get all the air out then roll it out on a floured surface until it's thin enough to see your hand through, sprinkle the Halloumi into one half then fold it over. Place on a hot, dry skillet for about 30 secs then flip over and repeat.

Naans are pretty similar but need to be rolled out a bit thicker, the ingredients and method are basically the same just without halloumi. If you have access to a tandoor or have a big stone you can cook on they'll turn out much better.




I agree I made a DIY tandoor with large flower pots, and they turned out really good, or if you have a stone pizza sheet that would work as well



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 05:15 PM
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My grandmother is an excellent cook and baker. As a kid, I would go over to her house and it always smelled of fresh bread, just thinking about it makes me all nostalgic. As I got older, we would make bread together, and when I moved out, she got me a bread machine as a housewarming gift. That machine was used and abused, made bread with it, all the time.

A few years ago, I was diagnosed with celiac disease, it was a total bummer. Honestly, I felt like I was experiencing the stages of grief over the loss of bread, it was awful.

Luckily, the town I live in is a 'foodie' heaven, there was a bakery that made the best gluten free bread. I fed my family some, they did not even realize it was gluten free. However, they lost their large gluten free kitchen and don't have GF bread on hand all the time, you pretty much have to order it or get there first thing in the morning.

So, I've been thinking about getting back in to baking bread. If anyone knows a good GF recipe, please share!!



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 05:52 PM
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Well I was really into baking bread for years but this year I was tested for food intolerances and it was recommended that I stop eating wheat. Very sad, I know...my fancy new Kitchenaid blender just sits on the countertop looking lonely. I had purchased it to make my bread chewier and it worked. Now I make and eat almond bread. It is okay but more like a dense biscuit than an airy loaf of wheat bread.

Anyway, there is a good recipe with videos on sourdough starter. They use pineapple juice. In my wheat bread days I used this method and it worked great for me.

breadtopia.com...

Sal


a reply to: Atsbhct



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 06:06 PM
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a reply to: Jennyfrenzy

Since your favourite bakery doesn't have the ability to bake GF bread all the time, maybe they'll give you the recipe!? You should apply appropriate amounts of flattery regarding how it's the best gluten free bread you've ever had.

Unfortunately, I'm not a gluten free baker, but hopefully someone will share!



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 08:18 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct
I tried making bread a couple of times. I didn't use yeast the first time and the end result was something hard enough to break teeth. The second time ended up much better.

Thanks for sharing your recipe. I'll have to try it out when I get a chance.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 09:35 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
I am interested. It's very humid here, so high hydration recipes usually turn out pretty well.


This is my standard recipe that I adjust based on the humidity.
    3 cups bread flour
    2 cups cold water
    2 teaspoons yeast
    1 teaspoon kosher salt
    1 teaspoon olive oil

    Mix yeast into flour until incorporated. Add salt to the water and stir until dissolved. Add oil to the water mixture and stir. Add wet ingredients to dry and mix until the dough just starts to come together. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and let sit in the refrigerator overnight.

    Remove from the refrigerator and let come to room temperature slowly (I leave mine in a cold oven). When dough doubles in size punch down, cover and let double again.

    Once doubled a second time pour onto floured work surface and divide into two. Cover until doubled again.

    Place baking stone in an oven, preheat oven to 500* and place a heavy cast iron skillet on the bottom rack.

    Score top of dough with several cuts, load dough onto stone and then place 1 cup of water into the skillet. Close door for 1 minute. Add a second cup of water to the skillet and continue to bake for 15 minutes.

    Turn bread, reduce temperature to 475* and bake for 10-12 minutes more until bread is well browned.

    Turn off oven, open the door and let the bread cool on the stone for 10 minutes.

    Remove bread to a wire rack and let cool completely until crust is hard and bread makes a hollow noise when tapped.



posted on Oct, 17 2016 @ 10:49 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Good idea! They have a olive and mancheco boule that is so good, can imagine the smell in the house while it's baking.

Yum.



posted on Oct, 20 2016 @ 02:54 PM
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A suggestion to those who have issues with various bread things. I am being vague here since I am not a doctor.
In my case, I was really sensitive to the various dough conditioners and carageenan bakeries use.

For a while I was sensitive to all bread-y things. And to yeasts. NOTE: some places use a special super quick yeast that can still make me nauseated when I smell it. (Like the gas stations that have a pizza kitchen in them).

Now, during the allergy seasons when I am flaring up from the onslaught of pollens and molds I eat one piece of bread max per day. During the times when there are fewer allergens around, I can eat 2 pieces of bready things a day.

Eating plain whole yogurt daily allows me to sometimes eat more things with wheat/oats in them.

Hope this helps. It might not be the flour, but the yeasts.



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