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Magnetic Stirling engine

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posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 09:02 PM
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Pretty cool little engine I ran across that has the potential be used as a generator, it could also be put to an electric motor, makes me wonder what the output would be.


Feel free to share any engine designs you run across in the efforts in conservation of energy.




posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 09:04 PM
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a reply to: BigBrotherDarkness



makes me wonder what the output would be.

Something less than the energy content of the burned fuel.
It's not very efficient, but better than a steam engine. I think.


edit on 10/14/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 09:15 PM
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a reply to: Phage

A steam engine runs at 90% last I recall... first half I think shows the cycles with the heated and second shows just the magnets I think...

Hard to really tell without a better exploration... although, I was thinking of the same design used in a coil system like a faraday system. Like those old flashlights with a capacitor...

P.S. saying never is an extreme. Thanks for the reply.



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 09:20 PM
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a reply to: BigBrotherDarkness

A steam engine runs at 90% last I recall.
No.



second shows just the magnets I think.

No. The part with the magnet still has the burner, but reduced friction because of the magnet, supposedly.

Ah, I see that there is no pass thru shaft, so heat loss is minimized. That's the main trick of it. Elegant.
www.ridders.nu...


edit on 10/14/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 11:02 PM
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As Phage said, very elegant. I truly love Stirling engines! This is one of the best I've seen. Now to get them to do some useful work...

As far as steam engines being 90%, try this on:

Piston engine. Steam engines and turbines operate on the Rankine cycle which has a maximum Carnot efficiency of 63% for practical engines, with steam turbine power plants able to achieve efficiency in the mid 40% range. WikiLink


I know NASA has used Stirling engines on some deep space probes. S*F



posted on Oct, 14 2016 @ 11:33 PM
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Stirling engines are cool - especially with some modification, driving the motion with an electrical motor, using a fixed volume of working fluid.... say helium.

You end up with a Cryogenerator



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 02:29 AM
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a reply to: BigBrotherDarkness

With the new thin film magnetic components the whole "Moore's Law" version should continue. And the entire internal combustion engine falls by the wayside. Smaller turbines pushing out more power is the future.

No, the waste of heat of burning hydrocarbons is so ridiculous that I cannot believe that internal combustion engines have survived this long! Diesel had it figured out a long time ago... he thought that BIODIESEL was the way to run his more efficient engines (Yes, Phage, it is still internal but I am thinking about efficiency from the engine itself. And diesel is more efficient than gasoline. ETA: heat wise). But the fear of losing money shut that idea down so it is now all hydro-carbon diesel derived from oil.

Either way, everything is being set up to run on electricity.,, (tin foil hat time and TEOT's fanboy topic) because we can do nuclear fusion already (Lockheed Martin Skunkworks). It is just a slow release because of what we are already doing with our clever innovations with black budget projects (tin foil hat: black triangles), and that keeps the whole thing under raps.

Or at least to a tinfoil hat wearer!
edit on 15-10-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: trying to not to get Phage mad at me by not being specific! LOL



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 03:26 AM
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That new Navy unmanned sub "might" use a Stirling engine too.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 03:41 AM
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D@mn double post
edit on 15-10-2016 by TEOTWAWKIAIFF because: The old double post blues



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 03:46 AM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Question, Is this along the lines of the MIT closed CO2 super heated turbine?

Seems along the same lines but different uses. One being mechanical and the other being typical energy derivation.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 05:46 AM
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a reply to: BigBrotherDarkness

There is a simpler variant with the driving magnet attached to the piston and the counter force provided by gravity/spring.

If you want to get fancy replace the piston with an elastic membrane and use a coil (very much like a loudspeaker/dynamic microphone) to extract energy.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 09:48 AM
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Delightful find - thank you!

I confess that my only encounter with Stirling engines has been in Minecraft where they are one of the most useful little devices around! I hadn't thought to look them up and see what they are like.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 11:42 AM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: BigBrotherDarkness

With the new thin film magnetic components the whole "Moore's Law" version should continue. And the entire internal combustion engine falls by the wayside. Smaller turbines pushing out more power is the future.

No, the waste of heat of burning hydrocarbons is so ridiculous that I cannot believe that internal combustion engines have survived this long! Diesel had it figured out a long time ago... he thought that BIODIESEL was the way to run his more efficient engines (Yes, Phage, it is still internal but I am thinking about efficiency from the engine itself. And diesel is more efficient than gasoline. ETA: heat wise). But the fear of losing money shut that idea down so it is now all hydro-carbon diesel derived from oil.

Either way, everything is being set up to run on electricity.,, (tin foil hat time and TEOT's fanboy topic) because we can do nuclear fusion already (Lockheed Martin Skunkworks). It is just a slow release because of what we are already doing with our clever innovations with black budget projects (tin foil hat: black triangles), and that keeps the whole thing under raps.

Or at least to a tinfoil hat wearer!


The use of petroleum based Diesel vice biodiesel is a matter of supply. Bio fuels are a non-starter except for niche markets because of total supply and energy required for collection of biomass in a central processing facility. They are also edible by bacteria so the best thing that could be done with them would be to coprocess them with petroleum feedstocks or reduce them to hydrocarbons. Those that are not based on long chain esters, such as furans, have even more compatibility problems.
IC engines are relatively easy to make and are low cost. Mileage from a diesel car is roughly 1.5 times the mileage from a gasoline engine car including corresponding hybrids. The problem with universal use of diesel may be the MW distribution of petroleum feedstocks. Unless you wish to oligomerize the gasoline and lighter cuts, there are limits on production of diesel. There are also different emission problems. With the reduction of sulfur in diesel fuel the big problems are NOx and particulates. A filter or afterburner for particulates and urea injection for NOx are what may be required. Or, you could rig the test for NOx by running rich and get the mileage up by running lean and hope you wouldn't get caught.

Eliminating petroleum from the fuel market will also have the consequence of eliminating low cost asphalt from road construction. Back to concrete and evil CO2 from cement kilns.

edit on 10/15/2016 by pteridine because: ETA



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 05:19 PM
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a reply to: TEOTWAWKIAIFF

Diesel is a much better fuel when the emissions are taken into account because of the flash point... once it is up to temp the it auto ignites, so I can see why you are thinking helium perhaps H3 that has nothing to do with any military rip offs chasing a Schwarzenegger.

Liquid oxygen was something the company I did design work for last I retired had as a top secret stamp on it dated 1946 (government cryogenic facility) So thinking of the efficiency that could burn in say one of the X motors from Darpa would be the shiznight to check out...

Of course there is always hemp oil too for christ sakes.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: moebius

Elastomer... that could create a static charge from the electrons on the glass cylinder hmm this could go kind Telsa coil in electronic transmission of power.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 05:33 PM
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a reply to: Byrd

There is a perpetual motion machine a fellow did with a steel ball with a ramping mechanism through a loop with spring tensions I believe in weight ratio it's a beautiful clock work sort of mechanism kept in a secure vault that has a live feed camera that's been running for years now... sometimes my recall is a tad off when similar things are coalesced the steam engine I was thinking about was ran on freon either 12 or 13 you can carry it around in a bucket like water takes 2 or 3 degrees above room temp to boil and that I think was what had 90% above the potential for steam... gaps like any spark misfire or jump cylinders sometimes in the ol electric universe of the mind from all that cloud of thought :p

But yeah the perpetual motion machine was thinking of it done in a liquid filled tube.

There's all sorts of things we can add up to get new things out of it... the more recent quantum physics research has pretty much crushed nearly all classical physics in the newer connectivity of theorem in how it all works in the many pieces to how they all fit together, we aren't very far off from exploiting these forces to our advantage as a unified working theorem with no gaps.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: pteridine

That's why I suggested Hemp oil you can even burn kerosene in a diesel as long as the liquid is flammable and can get up to temp for the flash point of the fuel? It will continue to sling that flywheel around.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 06:56 PM
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originally posted by: BigBrotherDarkness
a reply to: pteridine

That's why I suggested Hemp oil you can even burn kerosene in a diesel as long as the liquid is flammable and can get up to temp for the flash point of the fuel? It will continue to sling that flywheel around.


You can burn many fuels in a diesel engine. Any biofuel is limited in supply and more expensive. Generally, plant oils are worth more as plant oils and not fuels.
The goodness measurement is cetane number. Kerosene is a lighter cut than diesel but will run. Even some things that you wouldn't expect to be good diesel fuels have advantages. Dimethyl ether, a low boiling liquid, works quite well and makes no particulate [soot] as there are no carbon-carbon bonds. Given the properties, this would seem to be best with a stationary diesel.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 07:23 PM
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originally posted by: TEOTWAWKIAIFF
a reply to: Bedlam

Question, Is this along the lines of the MIT closed CO2 super heated turbine?


Nah, Stirlings are compact and very very quiet, if you design them right.

And you can run them from liquid O2 and diesel, and dissolve the exhaust into the seawater.



posted on Oct, 15 2016 @ 07:26 PM
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a reply to: Bedlam

Just say it. They are bitchin'.

If I were a machinist and had a machine shop and had the time, I would build the one in the video.

What's cool about it (you'll get the joke in a minute), it could also run off an ice cube. But slower.

edit on 10/15/2016 by Phage because: (no reason given)







 
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