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Need help Stellarium

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posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 07:33 AM
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Hi im trying to figure out Stellarium and the command line options, but i cant get the command line, and i cant find anything online for help..
Anyone in here experienced in Stellarium?




posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Stellarium User Guide

Stellarium: Command Line Options



Some settings can only be changed by directly editing the configuration file.

The name of the configuration file is config.ini

If the configuration file does not exist in the user directory when Stellarium is started
,one will be created with default values for all settings

The main configuration file is read each time Stellarium starts up, and settings such as the observer’s location and display preferences are taken from it.

The configuration file is a regular text file, so all you need to edit it is a text editor






posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 09:19 AM
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a reply to: tikbalang

Hi tikbalang.

I love Stellarium... but, I need more info. Sounds like some sort of 'terminal' within Stellarium, but not 'text-user-interface'?

Can you give more information as it purpose/job function in program?



posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 09:43 AM
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a reply to: AttitudeProblem

thanks!



posted on Sep, 14 2016 @ 10:02 AM
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a reply to: AttitudeProblem

Im trying to go past the 100.000BC and AD mark, do you know if its plausible?



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 08:37 AM
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a reply to: tikbalang

I don't think so. Is there even a BC/AD choice? However, this may be another choice outside program:
Star Chart
edit on 15-9-2016 by Newt22 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 10:44 AM
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originally posted by: tikbalang
a reply to: AttitudeProblem

Im trying to go past the 100.000BC and AD mark, do you know if its plausible?


I don't think it is.

The extent to which Stellarium plots the motions of stars over a long period of time is limited. It uses the current measurements of Proper Motion (the apparent angular motion of a star across the sky with respect to more distant stars) to extrapolate the motion of stars across the sky.

For example, Arcturus has a proper motion of 2.281 arcsec/year. That means in the last 2,000 years its plotted position in the constellation Boötis has changed by almost 1.27° - two and a half times the angular diameter of the Moon as seen from Earth. That's a lot, and this is reasonably accurately plotted in Stellarium.

The problem is that stellar motions relative to the Sun are a 3D problem. In addition to the lateral movement that we call Proper Motion, each star is either moving closer or further away from our Sun. As stars get closer, and pass us, the lateral motion increases to a maximum, then decreases as they go by and move away. Meanwhile, the rate at which they are approaching (the radial velocity) decreases until it reaches zero at closest approach, then the rate at which they recede increases (you can see all this as you drive past a row of telephone poles - as you approach, the lateral movement rate increases until the flash past, and then slows down as they recede in the distance behind you).

Stellarium does not model the change in rate of proper motion; nor does it track changes caused by radial velocity. Arcturus is already receding from us at 5 kilometers per second. Thus, as time goes on its Proper Motion will decrease. Currently, Stellarium shows Arcturus as a 0.15-magnitude star 36.71 light years away. If you advance its clock 20,000 into the future, it will show that Arcturus' position has changed by ~12.7° (2.281 arcsec/year times 20,000), but it will still be listed and displayed as a 0.15-magnitude star 36.71 light years away. In reality, it will be further away and fainter, and will not moved as far across the sky from its plotted position.

That said, allow me to point out that Stellarium maps the position of the planets and their moons, and most asteroids & comets with exquisite accuracy within its +/- 100,000 year time-frame. This is because, instead of extrapolating from a single variable like it does with stellar proper motion, it calculates each planet's position based on its orbital elements.

The only drawback is that it does not track gravitational interactions from close-approaches. This means that if, in Stellarium, you have an asteroid zip past the Earth a few thousand miles away, it will not accurately predict its post-encounter positions because the program has not recalculated the asteroid's new orbit.

I think Celestia does calculate orbital interactions, but I have found it more difficult to use. It is not as intuitive as Stellarium.

The upshot is that, within the time-frame +/- 10,000 years from the present, Stellarium is quite adequate at plotting the positions of stars. However, the further you get from the here-and-now, the less-accurate its star maps will be. Its plotting of planets and moons is excellent.

Hope this helps.




posted on Sep, 15 2016 @ 01:37 PM
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a reply to: Saint Exupery

I solved it, was no easy work-around the Professor just gave me a problem and said;" Hey, solve it, bye bye!"

So i came up with a pattern grid with the Az/Alt grid, use the 100.000BC and 100.000 as fixation points to the mathematical equation to predict each of the stars movement.. So for know its just the X/Y axis the Z will probably come at a later time..

Thanks for all the help!



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