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Magnets that once attracted each other now repel each other..what happened?

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posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 10:02 PM
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I tried looking this up but couldn't find much information. I have two chip clips that have magnets on the back that I stick to the fridge when I'm not using them. I was at my desk today and noticed that the magnets were attracted to each other and stuck together. I took them apart for a moment and read an article. After I finished reading an article I put them back together but this time they repelled each other and no longer stuck to each other as before. The magnets are glued to a plastic chip clip and nothing changed between the time they were once attracted to now they repel. What could of happened during that short time frame that would cause one of my chip clips magnets to reverse polarity? I google searched it but couldn't find anything on the subject other then basic attract and repel similar and opposite polarity but nothing that would explain how a magnet that was not altered could reverse its polarity on its own.




posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 10:12 PM
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a reply to: PaladinRoden


grab your nearest tin foil hat,
mandela effect.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 10:19 PM
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Maybe flip 'em around.

Or more specifically, flip one of 'em around. Leave the other like it is.


originally posted by: PaladinRoden
I tried looking this up but couldn't find much information. I have two chip clips that have magnets on the back that I stick to the fridge when I'm not using them. I was at my desk today and noticed that the magnets were attracted to each other and stuck together. I took them apart for a moment and read an article. After I finished reading an article I put them back together but this time they repelled each other and no longer stuck to each other as before. The magnets are glued to a plastic chip clip and nothing changed between the time they were once attracted to now they repel. What could of happened during that short time frame that would cause one of my chip clips magnets to reverse polarity? I google searched it but couldn't find anything on the subject other then basic attract and repel similar and opposite polarity but nothing that would explain how a magnet that was not altered could reverse its polarity on its own.



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 10:22 PM
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maybe the electromagnetic waves from your monitor did something to them?



posted on Jul, 23 2016 @ 10:59 PM
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You just discovered the fundamental principle of magnetism.

All magnets have two poles: a north pole and a south pole.

Unlike electricity, where positive charges and negative charges can exist independently of each other,

there are no mono-poles in magnetism.



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 12:43 AM
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originally posted by: AMPTAH
You just discovered the fundamental principle of magnetism.

All magnets have two poles: a north pole and a south pole.

Unlike electricity, where positive charges and negative charges can exist independently of each other,

there are no mono-poles in magnetism.


He wants to know how one of the magnets reversed polarity in matter of seconds
edit on 24-7-2016 by wickd_waze because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 03:58 AM
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Its the Mandela Effect!

Somebody in CERN went back and changed history and how the polarity of your magnets came to be.



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 04:44 AM
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a reply to: PaladinRoden

Lol. sheer magic



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 05:20 AM
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a reply to: PaladinRoden

Flat magnets can be manufactured with alternating poles across their surface in invisible strips, usually about 2mm apart. Useful for a very thin flat magnet that will adhere to a very thin flat piece of steel like a fridge door.

These are sometimes called Zip Magnets or a Hallbach Array.

Here's a link to the Wikipedia page.

If you slightly offset the magnets, they will repel, if you offset them further, they will attract.



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 05:28 AM
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The fridge magnets we have you can take out the magnet from the plastic part and flip it over to the other side. If you didn't notice this, it will result in the magnets being able to stick to eachother.



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 09:40 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: PaladinRoden

Flat magnets can be manufactured with alternating poles across their surface in invisible strips, usually about 2mm apart. Useful for a very thin flat magnet that will adhere to a very thin flat piece of steel like a fridge door.

These are sometimes called Zip Magnets or a Hallbach Array.

Here's a link to the Wikipedia page.

If you slightly offset the magnets, they will repel, if you offset them further, they will attract.

Yes. I just tried this with my refrigerator magnet bag clips (with round, flat magnets built into the bag clip), and that's exactly what happened.

If I tried to perfectly match the two flat sides of the magnet, they repelled each other. However, if I offset them only slightly (a few millimeters), then the two flat sides struck together, although slightly offset.

So no Mandela effect here.



edit on 7/24/2016 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 10:33 AM
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a reply to: PaladinRoden

Doom Porn alert!

Polarity shift imminent!

LoL


Like someone else suggested fliping one of them around.
edit on 24-7-2016 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 24 2016 @ 04:44 PM
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originally posted by: AMPTAH
You just discovered the fundamental principle of magnetism.

All magnets have two poles: a north pole and a south pole.

Unlike electricity, where positive charges and negative charges can exist independently of each other,

there are no mono-poles in magnetism.



I understand how magnets work, however the magnet on the back of the chip clip is super glued to the plastic only leaving one side exposed. Both chip clips are the same with one side super glued to the plastic with one side exposed to stick to the fridge. The side that is exposed and not super glued to plastic were attracted to each other and after a few minutes at my desk I tried to put them back together like before but this time they repelled each other. Meaning that since one side is super glued and didn't change then that means for them to now repeal then one of them reversed their polarity. I was wonder since I'm posting in the science section and not conspiracy sections of the forum there would be a scientific reason how a magnet could simply reverse polarity so that when two of the same side once attracted each other now repel. I understand when you have a magnet that has both ends exposed you can easily demonstrate how one side attracts and the other side repels but in this example that is not the case to where only one side super glued to plastic.



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 02:37 AM
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In one word - TEMPERATURE



posted on Jul, 25 2016 @ 07:31 AM
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originally posted by: MrBlaq
In one word - TEMPERATURE


Temperature need not be a factor. As I said in my post (following what chronOnaut said in his post) I tried it with my two bag clip-magnets (which may be similar to the OP's magnets) and they both repelled AND stuck together -- depending on whether I was trying to line them up perfectly or if they were offset by a couple of millimeters.

The same thing happened when I tried it with those magnetic "thumbtacks"/paper holders. similar to the ones in the bag clip, these were flat round magnets about 1/2 inch in diameter and about 1/16 inch thick, and set in plastic. They would repel each other unless they were offset by a couple of millimeters, in which case they would attract.


edit on 7/25/2016 by Box of Rain because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 3 2016 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: PaladinRoden

That is a goos question.




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