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What do they teach in K-12 these days, anything????

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posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 11:30 AM
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I know for a fact that "cursive" is no longer taught in many/most elementary schools...and I find that sad. There is something to be said for legible penmanship.

But, this morning my husband heard on talk radio some much more frightening news. Interns at the station didn't know why we celebrate the 4th of July!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! How is that even remotely possible?

They also could not name the US states that border the Pacific Ocean...and could see no reason that information was of any value to them. I am unclear if they even knew where the Pacific Ocean!

So, please, tell me:
What is being taught K-12 these days, either as a parent of these kids.....or as a young adult recently graduated.




posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

That's scary! Curious, where do you live?

I am not a fan of Common Core

I have to constantly tell my child to sign his name on his work because teachers in his old school tell the kids it's not necessary - I know he's not the only student told that because I do homework with kids in an after school program and they've told me the same thing. They then get an explanation from me as to why it is imperative to sign your work.

I actually think my old English teacher Mrs Dickinson would be pulling her hair out if she had to teach these days.

The mandatory reading requirements have gone downhill as well, so I make sure to provide my child with subjects that will actually teach him something, without the horrendous fiction that they currently have to struggle through.

Also, I'm finding kids cannot tell time and cursive is important IMO.




edit on 4-7-2016 by KTemplar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 11:43 AM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

80s child here: I have a nephew that has just gotten through second grade. You know what his biggest problem was? Something they call groups. Each person creates a group and each group needs members. It is a side project but honestly it is ridiculous that they are teaching our kids how to form political groups.

Another thing is the math he has to learn. The common core math.

The only thing he understands is Christmas.

But if you want to get down to the core of what they are learning.... You will find out your kid has a better chance of becoming a millionaire if you teach them yourself.

Honestly invest in home schooling. Don't have time? Buy homeschooling computer programs. Don't have a computer? I don't know what to tell you.

You can get a better education by simply having your child go onto a computer and learn from online programs than public education. It is becoming a running joke that is starting to stick. Where public education is taking a seriously dark undertone to the very definition of it. An education from the general public. And since the general public is mostly stupid.... Expect your kids to come out just as stupid.

Look at me.... I stayed in school until my senior year and figured out I was pretty much retarded. Once I left, and after ten years of doing about 18 different jobs for several companies I am much better off than half of my class who went off to college.

The amount of debt I have is only around 12 grand. My friends all have 20 grand plus, some in the 50 grand plus spectrum who are either jobless, or feel like they have wasted their life in school for a very expensive piece of paper with a signature on it.



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

Not just Cursive, but I remember taking hand notes during class, writing as fast as the teacher spoke almost.

We also practiced drafting, although it was discontinued for CAD, same with doing long division and multiplication on paper, prior to hand calculators.

All this practice taught hand eye coordination, manual dexterity, problem solving and perspective.

Nowadays most of us use two digits, we're all thumbs.

Days kids are like, we're sorry we don't need to study, write or practice much of anything. If we have to know something, we google it.

Which is cool, as long as the system stays up.



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 11:46 AM
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originally posted by: KTemplar
a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

That's scary! Curious, where do you live?

I am not a fan of Common Core

I have to constantly tell my child to sign his name on his work because teachers in his old school tell the kids it's not necessary - I know he's not the only student told that because I do homework with kids in an after school program and they've told me the same thing. They then get an explanation from me as to why it is imperative to sign your work.

I actually think my old English teacher Mrs Dickinson would be pulling her hair out if she had to teach these days.

The mandatory reading requirements have gone downhill as well, so I make sure to provide my child with subjects that will actually teach him something, without the horrendous fiction that they currently have to struggle through.

Also, I'm finding kids cannot tell time and cursive is important IMO.






posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: DontTreadOnMe

I believe the only thing REALLY being taught in any American school over the last several decades is conformity. Not until college do you stand at chance at getting any real education, and even that is rare.

The world is being filled with mindless drones that have one particular skill they can perform at a marginal level and continue through life at a steady rate of one cell phone a year, a car every two years, a couple of kids before thirty, pumped endlessly with advertising, propaganda and the same rehashed stories in entertainment day in and day out. Denied access to enlightening substances but prescribed mind dulling substances at an alarming rate. Living vicariously through the perverse cult of celebrity. Until they retire... and then they play the grandchildren game and it's just another endless cycle.

For the average drone... just how much education do they really need?



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 11:50 AM
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I know some schools are teaching art and math, anatomy ...Not common core,
And reading skills.



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 11:51 AM
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My kid is thirteen and she has to write in cursive in school.
I can't say I'm a big fan of cursive though. I've tried to read some old hand written letters and it's nearly impossible to read.



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 11:56 AM
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I can see how kids become so attatched to holidays by all the holiday activities they do in school.



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 12:45 PM
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a reply to: KTemplar
Michigan.

Interesting about signing your work....and I can see the value in that.
Not telling time? I think I did hears something about that.....

And colleges are not immune from dropping things that make you think....
Wayne State University has dropped their
www.zerohedge.com...
But do they really teach math much in all high schools?

In announcing the change in mathematics, the university said, "This decision was made largely because the current (math) requirement is at a level already required by most high school mathematics curriculum."



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

What? No drafting and long division/multiplication?
Even with CAD...using pencil and ruler has a lot of value....IMHO. I took three years of drafting in high school....it was my favorite subject.

 


a reply to: GiulXainx

Had we had children, I think I would have opted for home schooling, money permitting....I agree with your assessment of the quality of most public education these days.



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 01:00 PM
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"You could navigate your entire academic career and never have a conservative teacher."

--- Ben Shapiro




posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 01:34 PM
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You know, Einstein said the same things. He didn't bother memorizing certain things because they were readily available in books. a reply to: intrptr



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 03:08 PM
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I have an 8 your old son, live in Alabama. They still teach everything I learned in school with the addition of a basic PC course. Next year all of his work must be done in cursive and he has to memorize the multiplication table. Last year he learned how to tell time on both styles of clocks. Nothing I was taught has been omitted thus far.



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 03:20 PM
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As a military child I went to 13 schools in 14 years. I graduated two years "late" because I didn't go to school when we lived on a tiny island while stationed at an obscure naval base in the Caribbean. I was 12-13 years old. I went to five different high schools including a Catholic School and did Calvert Academy home school. My education has been /interesting/. I spent a decade in the military so I got technical training for 2-3 years (for my 7-level). I work full time from home as a state coordinator for a large disaster relief organization, and go to school full time as a grad student at an aeronautical university. I'm *almost* done! (I also have zero debt.)

My kids are 8 and 10 and we just finished our first year doing SECULAR home school. They also attend CoOp where I teach in the spring and fall. Last spring it was Oceanography, and in the fall I will teach Cryptography to middle grades and Research Methods to the teens getting ready for college.

We practice hand writing, print and cursive. Typing is an ongoing project. In addition to the "standard" math, science, and language arts curriculum we have a robust art program - having been to several European museums - we study art history and architecture rather than just making art - which we also do because art is rad!. We also have a loose music "program" because it comes up in other subjects like history. We listen to different kids of music all day, and we have a piano, violin, and both acoustic and electric guitars that they can use any time. They might eventually take formal lessons but right now they are doing more outside stuff. I am an "outside person" so we have a hearty physical education program that includes swimming, biking, running, skating, playing, hiking/camping (where I sneak in prepping and resilience), gymnastics team, and whatever sports they want to try that are going on at the moment. We study American and world history. They got bored studying each state so we will probably revisit that later when we pick up government/legislation studies. I also make it a point that they follow current events (refugee crisis etc) and I think they will be ready to write current event reports on their own this winter or next spring. My husband is a tech guys so he teaches them computer science: hardware/software, troubleshooting, electronic principals, computer languages, internet 101 (safety), and coding games. Together we have made our own web page with links to what they are allowed to safely access on the internet. They earn an allowance through a series of chores and caring for our zoo of pets, so I have started teaching them economics, finance, and international trade (because kids should know about where stuff comes from and why money is important - and about bills and debt). Having lived in Italy and Germany we have always studied languages - German, Italian, Spanish, French, and Latin (just the basics of each obs). The girl knows sign language. She wants to be a pediatrician and wants to be able to talk to ALL of her patients. I have also developed a "life studies" program (think health meets home econ.) that basically includes anatomy, hygiene, basic first aide, mental health (right now its about identifying feelings, personal ethics, and learning manners - again we are secular), age appropriate sex-ed/reproductive health, and nutrition. Nutrition includes knowing how to budget, shop, prepare, cook, and clean up meals. They can sew, repair, clean safely etc...And lets see...I feel like I'm forgetting something. I'm working on specifically incorporating critical thinking skills. I document and track all of this of course.

They are at grade level in some areas and 2-3 grades ahead in other areas like math. We had to stop for a little while because I think pre-algebra for an 8 and 10 year old can wait. We will probably start intro to chemistry in the fall too because they have pretty much finished earth science and biology. (I have a bachelors of science and I'm wrapping up my masters of science - so I feel okay in this area.) The boy is already mastering a program that lets you mix base elements to create new more complex elements (on the computer) and he is almost through with the whole periodic table. We also go to the library every two weeks. They have each read over 100 recreational books this summer: 200 page comic books, age level books, but about 1/3 are legit chapter books - magic school bus and goosebumps) and they have VOLUNTARILY racked up about 50 hours (3000 minutes) of reading each since April. Our library has a rewards program so I have to track their books because PRIZES MOM! haha.

We don't do every subject every day. I set the curriculum about a week or two in advance and we just do it at our own pace. Sometimes one thing leads to another and we go off curriculum. That's cool too. We probably only average 15-20 hours of school a week (with 15 mins of play for 45 mins of work) for 200(+) days a year. Super flexible. We watch a LOT of documentaries. They love them. (They also like regular kid shows like Disney or Cartoon Network- but not during school as they are more of a treat). We also have a ton of activities outside of school like gymnastics team, swimming, boy/girl scouting, soccer, and theatre. They were just in a musical (The Jungle Book) put on by the Missoula Children's Theatre. My daughter has been taking sign language lessons for a year, and she has expressed interest in piano lessons. Most of these are free in my community or I trade with the teacher; baby sitting for sign language lessons for instance. My son would rather build stuff so we take stuff apart and fix cars and bikes. And Legos. My God the Legos. ALL the Legos. But again, not all at once. The girl is very social but the boy likes to chill in small groups so we host card/board game nights or go bowling with fewer kids.

I just make sure I hit all the MAIN bases and don't stress too much about it, we have met the state requirements. I intend for them to return to a private school because I plan to go back to work in 2 years. I have no doubt they will be ready and more well rounded than their peers. Healthier physically and mentally too. I would hope they would do college online or start at community college, then go away to university. I don't think they know college is an option (as in---it is a natural and expected progression---haha). Trade school or military service is on the table too. Whatever they do they will be independent and self-sufficient.

I'm not a tiger mom either. I just wanted them at grade level but they set the pace. We revisit material to make sure it's not lost. AND, I *did* just buy them their first tablets, Kindle Fires. The boy plays minecraft, subnautica, and other games like that. The girl plays the sims 4 and some horse game. They also watch TV and sit on their butts like regular kids haha. In summation, I don't know what the teach at public school these days. I only know that I was deeply dissatisfied the first two years we were back in the states with the busy work, lack of REAL education, and time wasted. They were bored.

Jax
edit on 4-7-2016 by Jaxsmash because: Spelling

edit on 4-7-2016 by Jaxsmash because: clarity



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 03:37 PM
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P.S.

I'm SURE most parents teach their kids a LOT of this without even thinking about it.

For some reason I wasn't taught how to pay bills. I could cook, but not really. I certainly wasn't taught sex education as well as my children. I had the basics, but it was all jumbled because I went to so many different schools. I had to develop my own life skills like ironing and shopping on a budget. No one taught me how to get a credit card or what interest was. I was the first one in my family to get a cell phone and the internet. No one taught me about car maintenance or navigation, I think it was assumed that I knew this stuff. I think I've done okay for myself.

I just want to make it a priority that they are comfortable doing stuff you don't really think about, like jumping a car or knowing when to go to the ER....how to get home...what to do if they can't get home... That way if/when a REAL crisis hits they will be cool as a cucumber, be able to take charge, and ---SURVIVE---. I feel that if I make it a point to actually teach and test the basics they ---will be equipped to improvise in a crisis.---

We do all kinds of drills at home and in public, (fire/tornado/etc) and later they will be more formally introduced to weapons training and safety because that's just responsible.

Jax



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 04:14 PM
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originally posted by: Jaxsmash
You know, Einstein said the same things. He didn't bother memorizing certain things because they were readily available in books. a reply to: intrptr


Smart man.

He still had to get dressed, go to the library and look it up.

We got it easy.. The world at our fingertips.



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 04:18 PM
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a reply to: Jaxsmash

Now that sounds like the perfect school to me - quite impressive!



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 04:22 PM
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Thank you! I appreciate it! I want them to have the tools to be able to use their own judgement on religion and politics...no little sheep here.


a reply to: KTemplar



posted on Jul, 4 2016 @ 05:22 PM
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I remember when i was in school (way back in the stone age) it was considered a semi capital offense worthy of suspension if you were caught with a calculator. using a calculator for math was considered cheating.



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