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Pear-shaped nuclei discovery challenges time travel hopes

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posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:36 PM
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Another find that challenges our beliefs and shows we have a lot to learn! I personally have always felt the Big Bang theory is wrong. No real reason it just doesn't feel right. The findings may mean there is a direction in time and so we can only travel from the past to the present.:-( They are going to do another experiment at cern to repeat and verify the experiments.


www.bbc.com...
"Scottish-based scientists have discovered that the nuclei of some atoms are not symmetrical.
The finding challenges some of the fundamental concepts of physics.
It could explain why there is more matter than antimatter - but it may also end hopes of time travel.
The Universe has a fundamental problem. Why is there so much stuff in it?

The Big Bang is the prevailing theory about how everything we know began. The theory states that the Bang created equal amounts of matter and antimatter.

You might expect those equal amounts of matter and antimatter to have cancelled each other out. Their masses would have been transformed into energy, leaving something akin to a warm glow and nothing else.
But as I'm sure you've noticed, that hasn't happened. Everything around us consists of matter: my keyboard, your home, the planet on which we stand, interstellar dust, other galaxies.
Where is all the antimatter?
Scientists at the University of the West of Scotland (UWS) think they can point to the reason. Although it could mean the textbooks will need a rewrite.


 


Mod Edit: No Quote/Plagiarism – Please Review This Link.
edit on 24/6/2016 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:41 PM
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If my understanding is correct the study cannot negate forward time travel. One way with no return. What if we live in a multiverse with infinite fourth dimensional time lines and we simply jump time lines.

Good find tho I'm glad the grandfather paradox has been put to rest.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:46 PM
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But...but... the flux capacitor!

Seriously, though, I can't believe how much of this article I don't understand.

star and flag



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: VegHead
But...but... the flux capacitor!

Seriously, though, I can't believe how much of this article I don't understand.

star and flag


I get this part, I am actually always happy to hear that something does not fit, it means maybe a new understanding that possibly leads to leaps forward!

"That symmetry dictates, among other things, that the nuclei of atoms can be one of just three shapes: spherical, discus or rugby ball.
But Dr Marcus Scheck at UWS and Professor Peter A Butler of the University of Liverpool have discovered a fourth form of nucleus.
It's pear-shaped."



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:12 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

Wow. This absolutely ruins the prospect of watching Primer for the eighth time.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

Well then, I can honestly say that I like my atomic nuclei the way I like my women: pear shaped



Nice info. Thanks!



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 01:28 PM
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originally posted by: olddognewtricks
a reply to: SeaWorthy

Wow. This absolutely ruins the prospect of watching Primer for the eighth time.


This experiment is interesting with different conclusions then Primer.



www.pbs.org...


In 2009, my colleagues and I showed that the quantum mechanics of closed timelike curves was essentially the same as that of teleportation and escape from black holes. In addition to providing a novel theory of quantum time travel, we performed an experiment that was the moral equivalent of the famous grandfather paradox of time travel: we sent a photon a few billionths of a second back in time and had it try to kill its former self.

What happened? Well, let’s just say that our experiment was not like one of the movies where they say at the end, “No animals were harmed during the making of this movie.” Gajillions of photons died. Luckily there is no society for prevention of cruelty to photons—yet. Ironically, however, the one photon we sent back to perform auto-homicide failed to off its former self.



The photon returning from the future was tasked with trying to prevent its former self from entering the teleportation device using a device called a photon gun, which was pointed closer and closer at the photon in the past. But the photon from the future couldn’t prevent the photon from the past from performing the teleportation, no matter how directly the photon gun was pointed at its past self.
That is, no matter how hard it tried, the photon couldn’t kill its former self. The closer it got to killing itself, the less and less likely the teleportation was to succeed. For a detailed account of the quantum theory of time travel and the results of our experiment, see here.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 02:12 PM
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This is very interesting. Because, My theory of matter has the nucleus being a 2 dimensional ring of neutrons and protons linked together like a circular chain. This pair shape is simply an estimation of this "nucleus ring"



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 03:57 PM
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a reply to: VegHead

I feel the same

How can they equate a direction a nuclei points to into time which is basically a measurement of distance and not something physical

I'm assuming that this is nothing more than a theory, a hypothesis, and needs way more further investigation before saying time travel is not possible in one direction

One thing is sure though, the more we discover about the workings of the universe, the little we realise we actually know



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 04:28 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

originally posted by: SeaWorthy
Another find that challenges our beliefs and shows we have a lot to learn! I personally have always felt the Big Bang theory is wrong. No real reason it just doesn't feel right. The findings may mean there is a direction in time and so we can only travel from the past to the present.:-
It's always seemed that to me that time flows in one direction.

How have you managed to make over 800 posts and not found the external source tags yet? You're supposed to put the content from external sources inside them. It's the cloud icon when you're writing your post.

a reply to: SeaWorthy
In this post you used the quote tags properly, for quoting another member of ATS, then improperly for quoting an external source, but even that's an improvement over the OP where you didn't use even the quote tags for the quoted material. Again, use the cloud icon for the EX tags for external sources.

External Source Tags - Please Review This Link.


edit on 2016623 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 05:35 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur




You're supposed to put the content from external sources inside them. It's the cloud icon when you're writing your post.


Thought is was for convenience not a must, sometimes the text is just easier to see with plain ole quotes and I do make it clear where it is quoted from.

Thanks for the link



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 05:54 PM
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Do subatomic particles ever travel backwards in time?

Best Answer: In quantum field theory, subatomic particles travel backwards in time routinely. In fact, quantum non-locality experiments strongly suggest that there are a lot of things travelling all over time in direct violation of special relativity, which is one of the reasons why Einstein loathed the "new" ideas of quantum mechanics. Check out Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory which says that it can even be interpreted that the reason why an atom in a distant star chose to emit an photon is because millions of years later, our eye was there to witness the starlight. Classically speaking, this is nonsense, but quantum theory is full of things that seems nonsensical, and yet supported by experiment.

I think the resolution to this problem is make the distinction between particles in "a classical state", in which it travels only forward in time, and particles in "a quantum state", where not only direction in time is meaningless, even locality is meaningless as well, within limits of the wave equation. In a sense, there is a kind of a space-time "foam" at quantum levels, where we have to toss out ordinary sense of space and time.

Check the link to a brief lecture on the Wheeler-Feynman absorber theory.

Source(s):
www.qedcorp.com...



answers.yahoo.com...

How do you respond to the above?

Welcome to ATS..

edit on 23-6-2016 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 06:40 PM
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a reply to: Kashai

Meh,

Physics has become such a clouded hodgepodge of ideas/results these days. It's still my favorite field of science, I just long for a bit of clarity.



posted on Jun, 23 2016 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: In4ormant


Nonetheless in relation to clarity and in general we pretty much understand about three to five percent of reality.


Imagine you new nothing about cars and someone hands you a fuel injector or carburetor in perfect working order.

Would you necessarily think about building a car?

In analogy that is pretty much where we are in relation to understanding reality.

edit on 23-6-2016 by Kashai because: Added content



posted on Jun, 24 2016 @ 01:42 PM
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This news doesn't really surprise me at all, the LHC hasn't found any evidence of supersymmetric twin particles even though it should be operating at energy levels high enough to form those particles. However it seems many scientists still wont give up on the idea regardless of all the things going against it. There's a fair amount of research which indicates supersymmetry cannot be correct. For example the following article was published back in 2013:


Professor Shears, from the University of Liverpool's Department of Physics, said: "It is one of the most frustrating confirmations we've ever had. We know our theory is incomplete, and this ultra-rare decay may give us clues as to what might replace it.

"But what this discovery tells us is that there are no signs yet of our best alternative, a theory called supersymmetry (SUSY). We haven't ruled out SUSY entirely, but we've definitely dismissed many of the most popular versions of it. We know that there must be new physics, but it's starting to look like this might be stranger than we'd imagined."

The decay observed at LHCb and CMS is predicted to be extremely rare in the Standard Model, with a Bs meson only decaying into two muons about 3 times in every billion. However, if ideas like SUSY are correct than the chances of the decay can be significantly increased or even suppressed.

phys.org...



posted on Jun, 24 2016 @ 02:03 PM
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a reply to: SeaWorthy

The thread of reasoning is very very long and much too uncertain.

Read, here is the actual article abstract: journals.aps.org...

Next, there are theoretical proposals which break a symmetry of Standard model just a little bit more, which may also (maybe sort of perhaps) explain the experimental results in the nuclei.

But this asymmetry between matter and antimatter is sort of known from the unexpected CP violation seen decades ago.

press.cern...

The underlying origin isn't really known but is being studied at CERN as well. This nuclear physics result may indirectly help as well. That's all that's happening.

en.wikipedia.org...



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