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Planet 9 was most likely an exoplanet stolen by our sun 4.5 billion years ago

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posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 03:07 AM
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Astronomers at Lund University in Sweden believe it's highly likely that the so-called Planet 9 originated in another star system and was captured by our sun as it left it's solar cluster , this if true would make Planet 9 the only extra solar planet we could realistically visit and explore at our current level of technology.....exiting stuff !


Through a computer-simulated study, astronomers at Lund University in Sweden show that it is highly likely that the so-called Planet 9 is an exoplanet. This would make it the first exoplanet to be discovered inside our own solar system. The theory is that our sun, in its youth some 4.5 billion years ago, stole Planet 9 from its original star. Listen to Alexander Mustill as he explains! An exoplanet or extrasolar planet is a planet that orbits a star other than the Sun




posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 03:24 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Well, its no longer an exoplanet, and stopped being one the very moment it was stolen from its original neighbourhood.

That being said, it would be very interesting to see how much we could learn about the other star, by the way the planet has formed, and how differing gravitational circumstances might have affected aspects of its construction, for example.

Interesting...very interesting!



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 03:24 AM
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a reply to: gortex

I'm still a little bit staggered regarding the notion of a new ninth planet and that astronomers are taking the idea seriously. It's like if they announced that there might be an island the size of Alaska in the middle of the pacific ocean that no one had noticed before.

That it might have been an exoplanet to begin with is even more interesting; I wonder where the newbie's original sun is now.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 03:25 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Planet 9 from outer space, then?



Did Ed Wood know?



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 03:31 AM
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OK, I'm going to draw upon UCLA Scientists only 6 months ago who determined that the Earth suffered a collision 4.5 Billion years ago with a smaller planet called Theia

Now this - could this latest announcement actually be referring to the same object?
edit on 2-6-2016 by Sublimecraft because: fixed link



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 03:31 AM
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a reply to: gortex

Seems very plausible.

@sublimecraft: I would guess unlikely as I'd imagine the byproduct of that collision would have left most material in the inner system. I think the Moon is thst by product tbh.

Also, I believe planet 9 is estimated to be, what, 5 earth masses or so? Fairly large object and I think the theorized Theia would have been roughly Mars sized, had Earth originally been a wee bit smaller.

I can't recall exactly, but I think I read an article stating that the orbital distances of the outer gas giants in our Sol systen are unusually far as compared to a lot of the gas giants we have seen around other stars. Of course we are still in the infancy of cataloging other systems.
edit on 2-6-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)

edit on 2-6-2016 by OneGoal because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 03:52 AM
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Would it be possible for planet nine to have a highly eccentric orbit?
edit on 2-6-2016 by GoShredAK because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 04:15 AM
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a reply to: GoShredAK

Mike Brown , the man who Killed Pluto thinks so.
twitter.com...^tfw



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 05:54 AM
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I think there is a higher probability of it being a fifth giant planet that was ejected into the outer Solar System by an encounter with (probably) Jupiter, and then had its perihelion subsequently raised by the close passage of another star. The fact that it fits rather nicely with current simulations of the early Solar System's formation is rather compelling.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 06:14 AM
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I would suggest that the supposed Mystery Planet/Nemesis Star or whatever lurks at the edge of the Solar System

is likely a remnant of the previous solar system of the Star which went Super-Nova and created the debris cloud from which our present Sun & solar System formed...

if I recall correct... the Star which went Super-Nova & created the elements for our Solar System was itself a 2nd Generation Star that went Nova more than 4.5 billion years ago...& it is possible that our possible Planet X or 9 was a distant planet of that ancient solar system which survived the Nova explosion to become a 'Orphaned planet' > or a Planet without a SUN to orbit around

we will never know until there is hard, physical evidence to be able to test...
so we might as well make the best Mythical tale possible ...
Krypton, the home planet of superman might well be the Planet 9 of this thread
but the planet survived as their Sun went Nova... in the opposite of the Krypton legend



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 06:19 AM
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originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: gortex

Planet 9 from outer space, then?

Arguably the worst sic fi movie, ever. A cult classic.

So is this idea, a 'planet 9'. Can't you guys hear the trolls laughing?



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 10:36 AM
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a reply to: intrptr

Until it's confirmed and officially named planet 9 it is , although I vote we call it Nibiru.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 11:08 AM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: intrptr

Until it's confirmed and officially named planet 9 it is , although I vote we call it Nibiru.

Smiles.. whatsit called now? This day year month.

So bored with the idea the sun can 'capture' another stars planet.

Voyager one is 17 light hours out, the nearest star is light years away. Between the two is vastly empty space, if two suns came that close they would disrupt both systems, resulting in disaster.

In all niceness, I hardly think they could somehow 'exchange' a single planet.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

The Galaxy was a different place 4.5 billion years ago , more chaos.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 12:49 PM
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originally posted by: gortex
a reply to: intrptr

The Galaxy was a different place 4.5 billion years ago , more chaos.

If you believe it had a beginning, that is. Its always been there, as far as the eye can see.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 12:51 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

Ok, so why are most galaxies moving away from us, as demonstrated by red-shift?



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 01:09 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

The evidence is there to show it had a beginning.
Everything has a beginning and an end , the Universe is no different.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 01:12 PM
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originally posted by: 0zzymand0s
a reply to: intrptr

Ok, so why are most galaxies moving away from us, as demonstrated by red-shift?

Most Galaxies? The Big Bang is still an accepted by science theory.

In an infinite Universe, there is no beginning or end.



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 01:13 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

I understand your theory. I'm just trying to figure out how you account for red-shift?



posted on Jun, 2 2016 @ 01:22 PM
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originally posted by: 0zzymand0s
a reply to: intrptr

I understand your theory. I'm just trying to figure out how you account for red-shift?


There are many bubbles in the bigger bubble.




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