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Ultra High Definition (4K) Crew Earth Observations

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posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 08:22 AM
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a reply to: tsurfer2000h

I said it makes it appear to be the entire earth




posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 08:28 AM
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a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

has nothing to do with that no one has ever seen stars in space only from earth



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 08:33 AM
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a reply to: ssenerawa




has nothing to do with that no one has ever seen stars in space only from earth


And yet we have seen them...and from the ISS also.



SO how does that happen?



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 08:34 AM
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a reply to: ssenerawa

Yes they have. ISS astronauts have seen and photographed stars, Apollo astronauts have seen, discussed and photographed stars. Soviet cosmonauts have also described them when in orbit.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 08:35 AM
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a reply to: ssenerawa




I said it makes it appear to be the entire earth


And again not one window from the cupola will give you that type of view...they orbit too low for that.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 11:46 AM
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originally posted by: ssenerawa
a reply to: Soylent Green Is People

has nothing to do with that no one has ever seen stars in space only from earth


In Michael Collins' autobiography "Carrying the Fire: An Astronaut's Journeys," Collins wrote about his experience as the command module passed behind to the night side of the Moon, and left him in complete isolation (not even able to communicate with Earth for some of that time, due to the Moon being in the way):

"I feel this powerfully -- not as fear or loneliness -- but as awareness, anticipation, satisfaction, confidence, almost exultation.

I like the feeling. Outside my window I can see stars -- and that is all. Where I know the moon to be, there is simply a black void, the moon's presence is defined solely by the absence of stars."

So Michael Collins did see stars. Not when the brightly lit Moon was mostly in his field of view, but he did when his eyes were in darkness.

Alan Bean talked about seeing stars, also. In fact, the back-up navigation equipment for the Apollo missions was an optical sextant -- which relied on the ability to see stars.

When a person is on the lit portion of the moon, or when they are looking at the lit-up earth, their eyes are adjusted to the brightness, and thus it is very difficult to see stars, unless they look away into the darkness and allow their eyes to adjust to the darkness.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 12:11 PM
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a reply to: nothingiscoincidence

the amount of money that would be needed to edit EVERY video and image from all countries' governments, all amateur astronomers, etc, would be astronomical. this is simply not possible.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 03:00 PM
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a reply to: tsurfer2000h


And again not one window from the cupola will give you that type of view...they orbit too low for that.


I think there was only ever one camera from a high orbit looking at the Earth, and it did not do very well. That was the Dish Network camera.
www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 03:20 PM
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a reply to: GaryN

ATS 1 and 3 were in geostationary orbit taking high resolution images of Earth.



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 03:55 PM
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originally posted by: OneBigMonkeyToo
a reply to: GaryN

ATS 1 and 3 were in geostationary orbit taking high resolution images of Earth.


Cool! Where do I find the images?
Found info on the experiments though:
nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov...

The Mars webcam shows a full Mars, but don't know the exposure times, as I thought an overexposed Mars might show some stars, but none there.
www.flickr.com...
Hopefully they will eventually put one of the new high rez cameras out there one day, I'd watch a cable channel view of Earth, much better than most of the cr&p they show!
edit on 7-6-2016 by GaryN because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 04:03 PM
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a reply to: GaryN

There are a few scanned versions of the images in volumes online, and there is this movie



Not all of the images are in colour as one of the channels failed.

If search ntrs.nasa.gov... for ATS meteorological data catalog you should get plenty more info.

The most famous image is this one:

upload.wikimedia.org...

Which is often claimed by hollow earth nuts to show a polar entrance at the top of the image, when in fact it's Greenland.
edit on 7/6/2016 by OneBigMonkeyToo because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2016 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: GaryN




I'd watch a cable channel view of Earth, much better than most of the cr&p they show!


It's not exactly a cable channel, but this is a nice one.






posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 11:32 AM
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a reply to: GaryN

You might also want to look here www.goes.noaa.gov... for more full disk imagery by satellites.



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 05:03 PM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

The proof is really simple: given that the RED camera can capture video with up to 300 frames per second, and that changes in clouds over a distance of 400 km is easily visible with the naked eye, we should see at least some changes in the clouds somewhere on Earth in NASA videos.

This simply does not happen. Every pixel representing a cloud in the video remains fixed for the duration of the videos. Normally, we should be able to see at least some jitter at some clouds. But we don't.



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 08:32 PM
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a reply to: masterp

There's no way that the ISS will be able to see movements in clouds from a distance 200 wiles away from those clouds (or 300, or even 500 or more, depending on the angle of view of the camera) for the several seconds of video that we saw.

Sure -- the naked eye can see motion in those puffy white cumulus clouds over your head, but those clouds are maybe only 1 or two miles over your head -- not 200 to 500 miles, or farther.



posted on Jun, 8 2016 @ 11:11 PM
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a reply to: masterp

Each pixel doesn't remain fixed though does it? It moves as the ISS passes over the Earth.

Feel free to support your claim with evidence rather than assumption.



posted on Jun, 9 2016 @ 09:49 AM
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originally posted by: masterp
a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

changes in clouds over a distance of 400 km is easily visible with the naked eye

Over the course of half an hour, perhaps, but not over the course of a few minutes or seconds that the clouds are visible to an ISS camera. The wide angle in most of the footage makes it even harder to notice any movement.

On the other hand, a timelapse from telephoto images of an erupting volcano does show changes in the plume and the pyroclastic flows: www.youtube.com...


edit on 9-6-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 2 2016 @ 07:45 PM
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As the "flat earth" has been discussed here at length, I feel that it would be on-topic to post this video from Dazza (who I wish were posting here on ATS)


www.youtube.com...

In this video, Dazza filmed a cruise ship sailing off to the horizon and gradually "sinking" below it. As the video is over an hour long, you can skip to the 30-minute mark to see the ship already somewhat below the horizon, and getting lower and lower. 46:00 to 48:00 is particulary interesting as it shows the ship's lights disappearing completely below the horizon.



posted on Jul, 2 2016 @ 09:25 PM
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If Saturn is not a sphere, what does Saturn's rings go behind as seen in my telescope. How is the star Polaris visible all year around but the constellations come and go from season to season. Is Polaris visible from Antarctica?



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