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Full-Circle Vista from 'Naukluft Plateau' on Mars , Another Beautiful day

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posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 03:34 PM
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Curiosity has for the last month been traveling over the roughest terrain it has yet encountered , the MSL team have stitched together images taken on April 4th of the Naukluft Plateau , lower Mount Sharp.

Click the Link for the full circle Zoomable image.
And here's the full sized Image , absolutely stunning.




posted on Apr, 30 2016 @ 05:52 PM
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originally posted by: gortex


Curiosity has for the last month been traveling over the roughest terrain it has yet encountered , the MSL team have stitched together images taken on April 4th of the Naukluft Plateau , lower Mount Sharp.

Click the Link for the full circle Zoomable image.
And here's the full sized Image , absolutely stunning.


It always takes your breath when you look at the Mars vistas. This new one looks so well done, so clear and less ambiguity. Now if only Lee Marvin would ride up round a butte!



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 01:56 AM
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Fantastic! Now we need someone to create a 360-degree pannable panorama version. I always prefer them over these flat and distorted images. Hopefully, Andrew Bodrov will make one soon.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
Fantastic! Now we need someone to create a 360-degree pannable panorama version. I always prefer them over these flat and distorted images. Hopefully, Andrew Bodrov will make one soon.


The picture in the link is a 360° panoramic collage, one of the best yet and so clear. The kind you talk about have much worse distortion, and less true of an image, and where there is a need to patch an image for continuity.

Below is an example from the curiousity selfie a couple of years back, use the link for full viewing.




files.abovetopsecret.com...

The picture on the right shows a shot from the curiosity selfie, the picture on the left, is one used to make up the panorama.
Notice how the rock in the green circle in the selfie is placed much more forward, and right behind the small rock in front, while the red circled rock is in much the same relative position to the small rock in front in both pictures.
edit on 1-5-2016 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 09:36 AM
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ohohoho







i tught i taw a puttycat





posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:04 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Probably not as good as the one you are expecting, but I made one two weeks ago, as you can see here.

I just added a white-balanced version today, here.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 11:15 AM
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originally posted by: ArMaP
a reply to: wildespace

Probably not as good as the one you are expecting, but I made one two weeks ago, as you can see here.

I just added a white-balanced version today, here.


There's sod all wrong with that ArMaP, that's as good as it gets, and better than some.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 07:04 PM
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originally posted by: smurfy


files.abovetopsecret.com...

The picture on the right shows a shot from the curiosity selfie, the picture on the left, is one used to make up the panorama.
Notice how the rock in the green circle in the selfie is placed much more forward, and right behind the small rock in front, while the red circled rock is in much the same relative position to the small rock in front in both pictures.

Those photos were taken from different places with different cameras, it's natural they look different.

The photo on the left was taken on sol 55, by the left "eye" of the mastcam, as you can see here. I made a small panorama with the photos from that sol, but as it's too small for GigaPan you can see it here (warning: it's a 22 MB image). That camera has a fixed focus and a 34 mm focal length.
At the time the rover took that photo it was in the position you can see below, marked as "56", as the rover was on that position on sol 55 and 56.



The photo on the right was taken on sol 84 by MAHLI, the camera on the rover's arm they use to take the "selfies". That camera can focus from 2.25 cm to infinity, with focal lengths between 18.39 mm and 21.41 mm and diagonal field of view from 33.8º to 38.5º. You can see that photo here.
On sol 84 the rover was on the location marked as "98", as it was there from sol 60 to sol 100.

PS: I got the map from here and the rest of the information from the MSL Curiosity Analyst's Notebook.

PPS: when making the panorama, the program I use (Microsoft's Image Composite Editor) lets the user choose the type of projection wanted, and different projections result in different distortions.



posted on May, 1 2016 @ 07:15 PM
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edit on 1-5-2016 by ImaFungi because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2016 @ 04:42 PM
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a reply to: ArMaP

That's pretty great ArMaP , thanks for adding.



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