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brittish laws to be printed on paper instead of vellum .

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posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 08:41 AM
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hey - exactly as the title says

it has been tradition to print all acts and statutes passed by the brittish parliament on vellum [ made from calf skin ]

however in a bid to save £80 thousand pounds per year it has been decided to switch to archive grade paper

thats not a typo // error - the cost difference really is £80K [ GBP ]

but despite the cost saving - not everyone is happy - as the procedural justification to do this uses a 15 year old vote

and critics of the change claim that the lifespan of the paper that will be used [ 500 years ] is insufficient as correctly stored vellum will last 2000 years

source

i disagree with both arguments presented in the artical

i believe that vellum should be retained for critical peices of legislation that have national and global impact - but paper subsituted for routine legislation that is altered or ammended on a regular basis

this would still produce a significant saving in cost - but keep the nations most important legislations preserved on the longer lasting vellum sheets

thats it - thoughts ATSers ?




posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 08:45 AM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape
Hmm. The Guardian is printing it as a new story (because of the point of order being raised), but I remember this being brought up in the last series of Have I Got News For You. I wonder if I can find a clip.



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 08:53 AM
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a reply to: DISRAELI

hey - appologies - its the first i read about it it was in the links section of another article i wanted to read



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape
No cause to apologise. It was really a comment on the slow reactions of the Guardian.
Anyway, I discovered the relevant episode. The story comes ten minutes in;


edit on 10-2-2016 by DISRAELI because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 09:05 AM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

Parliament should go interview the officials in Flint Michigan about what happens when you try to save money.



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 09:11 AM
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Print it on the Dead Sea scrolls material....that stuff stays good for 2 millennia....

Anyhow, I personally wish all governments would stop making laws, rules and regulation....stay out of my life for Christs sake...

Dear Parliament and the US Congress:
Just because u etch it on cows, deer or trees doesn't make it any less ridiculous that you feel entitled to spend my money...

Sincerely,
Christosterone



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

I honestly think that in the scheme of savings, £80k is piffle for the government. When you consider MP's expenses are around £90 million, they should just stop being tight and continue to use vellum. Don't buy a couple of fancy chairs or paintings, use it for our archive records instead.

Mind you, as this is ATS, perhaps they know we don't need to store anything for another 2'000 years.......(duh duh duh)....



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 10:02 AM
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Anything that lasts 2 thousand years is only going to be of interest to an archaeologist. It will have no bearing on what they do or how they run the country. If Britain even exists as a country by then, or any other for that matter. Does Egypt still run on laws written by the Pharaohs?



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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Poor vellum makers and their families








:shameemoticon: Did they printed like in a printer the stuff or someone hand made the laws?



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 10:23 AM
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Id say keep it the way it is, those cows are going to be eaten anyway, no point throwing out old skin, unless of course they make comfortable moccasins..... just kidding


80k on our budgets is like two or 3 familys on income support and wellwafre - it aint a huge saving really in the grand sceme of things - but i suppose every little helps, if archived paper has to be renewed every X years anyway and thats calculated into the long run - then sure why not swap over.



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 10:23 AM
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a reply to: Indigent
Good news for the kids, though.



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 11:25 AM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
Anything that lasts 2 thousand years is only going to be of interest to an archaeologist. It will have no bearing on what they do or how they run the country. If Britain even exists as a country by then, or any other for that matter. Does Egypt still run on laws written by the Pharaohs?

Wouldn't be so sure. The oldest legislation still in effect is 750 years old.



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: yorkshirelad

originally posted by: DAVID64
Anything that lasts 2 thousand years is only going to be of interest to an archaeologist. It will have no bearing on what they do or how they run the country. If Britain even exists as a country by then, or any other for that matter. Does Egypt still run on laws written by the Pharaohs?

Wouldn't be so sure. The oldest legislation still in effect is 750 years old.


Which one is that, "thy shall not all jelly at thoust' best friends latest generation ipad!



posted on Feb, 10 2016 @ 03:13 PM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

Why not just use stone tablets?, they last longer than vellum. tradition my ass, we live in the damn electronic age.



posted on Feb, 11 2016 @ 10:37 PM
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Much ado about nothing. My 2 cents.

Unless degrading legislative documents before they can be transcribed is an issue, anyway. Seems to be more about the pomp and circumstance of having an original document. Which i get...lawyers love their pomp with a double helping of circumstance.



posted on Feb, 17 2016 @ 07:08 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
Much ado about nothing. My 2 cents.

Unless degrading legislative documents before they can be transcribed is an issue, anyway. Seems to be more about the pomp and circumstance of having an original document. Which i get...lawyers love their pomp with a double helping of circumstance.


Actually, I was thinking about this earlier today. If the US started using vellum to transcribe our laws I bet we could bankrupt the government unless they stop writing multi thousand page pieces of legislation. Might be one way to regain some sane practices over the government.



posted on Feb, 21 2016 @ 12:44 AM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

Wow they still use animal hide to record official documents in England?

That is cool! I thought everyone used paper or hemp.



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