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Do You Suffer From False Emotions?

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posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 09:57 AM
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empathy is a process of relating to another person because you can appreciate your own experiences in conjunction with theirs. projecting your struggles and triumphs on theirs and recognizing the common ground. there is nothing fake about that.
edit on 1-2-2016 by TzarChasm because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 09:57 AM
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a reply to: enlightenedservant

Perhaps I worded it poorly.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 09:59 AM
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a reply to: Iamnotadoctor

How is that judging her? I asked her a question about her experience. When you have a good relationship with a person, it's okay to ask questions without them being outraged. It created a nice long conversation.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:01 AM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Death of a child, abused animals, extreme stressful situations etc, etc,etc....can cause emotional responses.

They arent false but real.....the stimuli that caused it may not be. Pictures, art, music, news, tragedies.....all can cause emotional responses.

They are real emotions. We are human.....



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:04 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: enlightenedservant

Perhaps I worded it poorly.



Not your fault. I'm waaay too pedantic. Sometimes it's a good thing, like if I'm arguing over details. But it sucks when I'm having normal conversations because different wordings can imply much different meanings. For example, "I fear for my life" can mean "I'm scurred! Help me!" or "I'm going to kill someone and I've already got my alibi." My mind sees both as possible arguments, so I usually ask for clarification.

Either way, it was my bad.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:07 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Iamnotadoctor

How is that judging her? I asked her a question about her experience. When you have a good relationship with a person, it's okay to ask questions without them being outraged. It created a nice long conversation.



You sat there next to your so called 'friend' while they we 'bawling' for over an hour during a movie?
Did it ever cross your mind that a situation like that is really, really not good?
To actually say to your friend after the movie, "You unnecessarily bawled for over an hour, over nothing."
Yeah. There is indeed a problem.
I would submit that the problem lies in you.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: Iamnotadoctor

originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Iamnotadoctor

How is that judging her? I asked her a question about her experience. When you have a good relationship with a person, it's okay to ask questions without them being outraged. It created a nice long conversation.



You sat there next to your so called 'friend' while they we 'bawling' for over an hour during a movie?
Did it ever cross your mind that a situation like that is really, really not good?
To actually say to your friend after the movie, "You unnecessarily bawled for over an hour, over nothing."
Yeah. There is indeed a problem.
I would submit that the problem lies in you.



Is that any different than the following scenario? Two people are watching a movie, one laughs hysterically at it; while the other sits there in silence the whole time. Then after the movie is over the silent one turns to the other and asks why they laughed so much. The silent one thought the movie wasn't funny.
edit on 1-2-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
Oh my gosh, I'm not putting anyone down for being emotional, and I didn't sat it's wrong.


I didn't say you were putting anyone down or that you were saying it's "wrong". Not sure where you got that idea...



Just because I don't cry about acting, doesn't mean a have Aspergers. That's ridiculous.


I didn't say that, either...



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:09 AM
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originally posted by: mysterioustranger
a reply to: Atsbhct

Death of a child, abused animals, extreme stressful situations etc, etc,etc....can cause emotional responses.

They arent false but real.....the stimuli that caused it may not be. Pictures, art, music, news, tragedies.....all can cause emotional responses.

They are real emotions. We are human.....


I would personally view these emotions that are illicied through fiction as overstimulation somewhat. It wouldn't be human to feel no response, but I don't read a book and feel sad because a character died. I can understand the emotions of the character, how it relates to the story, but it's not real, it just doesn't affect me.

I don't watch a television show and get angry because a child is kidnapped, it didn't really happen.

As an outsider, it seems, on this issue, I'm just wondering, who would we be, as humans, if these fictional emotional triggers were not there?



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic

originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: Atsbhct

I think there is a difference between an emotion being fake, and the instigating source of that emotion being fake.


This. If I watch a movie about a dog and he dies in the end, I'm not feeling sad about that dog (who doesn't really die, because it's only a movie) but because I know how it hurts to have a beloved dog die. My emotions aren't "fake". They're very real. I actually watch the movie TO BRING ABOUT a good cry, because THAT is beneficial to me. I LOVE a good cry. It can be as exhilarating as a good "romp in the hay" sometimes. I think most women do like to cry now and then. Your friend could have left the movie if she didn't want to cry. You say we don't need those emotions, but maybe we just love to feel them.

I'm a VERY emotional person and cry at the drop of a hat. And I love it. Crying, feeling sadness or relating to someone's feelings aren't bad things. Some people are just more inclined than others in that area... Nothing wrong with being either way.

You may have Asperger's if you don't feel a lot of emotions or empathy. Ever watch Dexter? Classic aspie.


I didn't say in my OP that I had a lack of emotions. Everyone has emotions. I do not have Aspergers.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:17 AM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

As someone who defers to logical and unemotional analysis more than emotional analysis, I get regularly accused of being unemotional. So I can feel for you here. I still have emotions too. I also know how to let loose and let emotions dictate my actions; I just also know how to compartmentalize them so they don't rule my thought process all the time.
edit on 1-2-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:18 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t

originally posted by: Iamnotadoctor

originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: Iamnotadoctor

How is that judging her? I asked her a question about her experience. When you have a good relationship with a person, it's okay to ask questions without them being outraged. It created a nice long conversation.



You sat there next to your so called 'friend' while they we 'bawling' for over an hour during a movie?
Did it ever cross your mind that a situation like that is really, really not good?
To actually say to your friend after the movie, "You unnecessarily bawled for over an hour, over nothing."
Yeah. There is indeed a problem.
I would submit that the problem lies in you.



Is that any different than the following scenario? Two people are watching a movie, one laughs hysterically at it; while the other sits there in silence the whole time. Then after the movie is over the silent one turns to the other and asks why they laughed so much. The silent one thought the movie wasn't funny.


Yeah. It's completely different.
Within the context of the OP, it is.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:18 AM
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a reply to: Iamnotadoctor

Planning on explaining yourself then? Please elucidate and let me know how they are different, because I'm not seeing it.
edit on 1-2-2016 by Krazysh0t because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:20 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Seems I've ruffled a few feathers with the mere SUGGESTION that the OP MIGHT have a condition that I'm VERY familiar with and have no negative judgments about... I have several people in my life with Asperger's. It was just a suggestion. Nothing for ANYONE to be offended about. If I was trying to offend someone, it would have been clear.

To suggest that someone who has one of the characteristics of a condition might just have that condition is not a far stretch, IMO. I didn't mean any offense.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:20 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct

originally posted by: mysterioustranger
a reply to: Atsbhct

Death of a child, abused animals, extreme stressful situations etc, etc,etc....can cause emotional responses.

They arent false but real.....the stimuli that caused it may not be. Pictures, art, music, news, tragedies.....all can cause emotional responses.

They are real emotions. We are human.....


I would personally view these emotions that are illicied through fiction as overstimulation somewhat. It wouldn't be human to feel no response, but I don't read a book and feel sad because a character died. I can understand the emotions of the character, how it relates to the story, but it's not real, it just doesn't affect me.

I don't watch a television show and get angry because a child is kidnapped, it didn't really happen.

As an outsider, it seems, on this issue, I'm just wondering, who would we be, as humans, if these fictional emotional triggers were not there?


Ah, I see. This post made it much clearer for me. I think I understand where you're coming from now.

The only times I get feelings from art are when a singer's actually feeling the performance, when a musical score has a certain amount of emotion in it, or when a painting/drawing/movie touches on an event that I already care about. And in that final example, I purposely immerse myself in it to better understand similar situations.

But most movies have no effect on me except to entertain or educate me (like documentaries). So if a character is crying or furious, I'm usually paying more attention to the actor's delivery & the cinematography than the characters themselves. I just see it as a glorified play, which is what I'm thinking you're saying too.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
When you have a good relationship with a person, it's okay to ask questions without them being outraged.


Yes. Just asking a question.


originally posted by: Atsbhct
I didn't say in my OP that I had a lack of emotions.


I said emotions OR empathy.

I do not have Aspergers.


OK! Jesus Christ! It was just a suggestion! Wanna talk about how sensitive you are? Sorry, I wasn't worried about being politically correct.
edit on 2/1/2016 by Benevolent Heretic because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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Stimuli are suggested: they may be accepted or refused.

Suggestibility fluctuates proportionally with fatigue and repetition, and inversely with practices such as temporary prevention of external stimulation (as in retreat or meditation, contemplation & c.) and focus on internal stimulation (as in applying your own plan or being in the zone).
Self-knowledge differentiates welcome emotions from unwelcome emotions.

Figurative keys and locks are smithed in uncaring brains, and used with a wide spectrum of intention.
False emotions allow people to feel the thrill without the consequence, through violent or *exual films for instance. The principle is removing the possibility for agency, as in "what happens isn't influenced by my thoughts or actions". What information make us sad or afraid? This is the stuff to look out against.

Because it takes substantial effort to own one's reactions, some assume it is not worth the effort or even impossible.
This is how we are played: through sugestions of fears, hate and inferiority, often disguised as their opposites and not even directed as us personally.

So yes, we suffer from false emotions, either felt by our self or by others because when those around you are on mood pills or sad/afraid, life isn't as fun because nasty consequences for all when majority feels unable, like fascism or fascism cleverly disguised as freedom.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:24 AM
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a reply to: Iamnotadoctor

We weren't together as we watched the movie, so your comment has no bearing on this entire conversation. Why do you feel the need to be inflammatory?



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:30 AM
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originally posted by: Benevolent Heretic

originally posted by: Atsbhct
When you have a good relationship with a person, it's okay to ask questions without them being outraged.


Yes. Just asking a question.


originally posted by: Atsbhct
I didn't say in my OP that I had a lack of emotions.


I said emotions OR empathy.

I do not have Aspergers.


OK! Jesus Christ! It was just a suggestion! Wanna talk about how sensitive you are? Sorry, I wasn't worried about being politically correct.


I think you're being sensitive, honestly. I don't mean that offensively, but I was responding to your assumptions. If someone suggests you have a disorder, it's okay to say you do not have it.



posted on Feb, 1 2016 @ 10:36 AM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Iamnotadoctor

Planning on explaining yourself then? Please elucidate and let me know how they are different, because I'm not seeing it.


The Op has clarified in recent posts that she didn't physically see the movie with her friend, they saw the movie seperate.
I 'assumed' that they saw the movie together.
If you look back at my posts you'll see that I was making an issue about my feeling that it would be really bizarre to let a friend cry for half a movie.. etc.. Etc...



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