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Anomalies on the dark side of the Moon - IPERZOOM -

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posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 06:08 PM
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So, I assume everyone in here knows this pretty little website where you can zoom upclose to little rocks: target.lroc.asu.edu...

right?

I spent hours there since I discovered it. What i didn't know, until now, was that you can actually choose the dark side too! So I just started my zoomming voyage and I already found pretty interesting things:

i.imgur.com...

here the coordinates: http://(link tracking not allowed)/1QWoW85

now, zoom back and notice how incredibly close we were o____o

what a coincidence, early today i saw this video too: www.youtube.com...

now I wonder where those structures he mentions are...considering that what we see in our website is incredibly much more zoommed that he saw back then!




posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 06:47 PM
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a reply to: egidio88




posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 06:51 PM
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originally posted by: EA006
a reply to: egidio88



share ur coordinates, there is the proper buttone in the website, up right =)



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 06:52 PM
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a reply to: egidio88

http://(link tracking not allowed)/1OYbZVg

Lat: -20.1962 Lon: 128.8449
edit on 29-12-2015 by EA006 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 06:56 PM
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link tracking not allowed? =(

i just noticed it in my post, too =(



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 06:59 PM
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posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 07:03 PM
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a reply to: Deaf Alien

Thanks.




posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 09:36 PM
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Pretty interesting at the top of the moon in the rough area in those pictures. Almost looks like power lines. Also some square objects.

It's probably just an illusion but at least it is an interesting one.



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 10:52 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Pretty interesting at the top of the moon in the rough area in those pictures. Almost looks like power lines. Also some square objects.

It's probably just an illusion but at least it is an interesting one.


the dark side is definitely more interesting than the regular one!!! By the way, I just took this picture with my telescope and the cellphone =)

i.imgur.com...
edit on 29-12-2015 by egidio88 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 11:17 PM
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Firstly, it's called the far side, not the dark side. It gets just as much sunlight as the near side.

Secondly, there are usually more than one high-rez image of any part of the Moon, different images being taken at different times of the lunar day and, thus, helping in trying to analyse the topography.

Here's EA006's area with a much better sun angle:



To all intents and purposes, I'm looking at boulders.

As for the OP's image, here's also a better view:



Here's another view, and the shadows allow you to estimate the shape of the objects:



~~~

Here's a quick guide on how to access these additional images:

1) Zoom into the area of interest.
2) Click the "tool" icon in the top right corner.
3) Click the box icon titled "Search tool".
4) Drag a box over the desired area.
5) Click in the box and select Query > NAC LIVE access.
6) Select one of the listed images and click "Add Layers" button.

The new image will now be overlayed in the main screen. Repeat the steps to access any other images listed.

P.S. Attempting to fix the OP's link: bit. ly/1QWoW85 (Copy & paste that into your address bar, and delete the space after the dot)

P.P.S. What's cool is that, if you zoom out, you can see that the larger boulder tumbled down the hill side, leaving a trail:


edit on 30-12-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 11:46 PM
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a reply to: wildespace




Here's another view, and the shadows allow you to estimate the shape of the objects:

That rock at frame center is hovering.



posted on Dec, 29 2015 @ 11:55 PM
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originally posted by: egidio88

originally posted by: rickymouse
Pretty interesting at the top of the moon in the rough area in those pictures. Almost looks like power lines. Also some square objects.

It's probably just an illusion but at least it is an interesting one.


the dark side is definitely more interesting than the regular one!!! By the way, I just took this picture with my telescope and the cellphone =)

i.imgur.com...


There are definitely Indians up there, I saw rocks piled on top of each other.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 12:15 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
Firstly, it's called the far side, not the dark side. It gets just as much sunlight as the near side.

Secondly, there are usually more than one high-rez image of any part of the Moon, different images being taken at different times of the lunar day and, thus, helping in trying to analyse the topography.

Here's EA006's area with a much better sun angle:



To all intents and purposes, I'm looking at boulders.

As for the OP's image, here's also a better view:



Here's another view, and the shadows allow you to estimate the shape of the objects:



~~~

Here's a quick guide on how to access these additional images:

1) Zoom into the area of interest.
2) Click the "tool" icon in the top right corner.
3) Click the box icon titled "Search tool".
4) Drag a box over the desired area.
5) Click in the box and select Query > NAC LIVE access.
6) Select one of the listed images and click "Add Layers" button.

The new image will now be overlayed in the main screen. Repeat the steps to access any other images listed.

P.S. Attempting to fix the OP's link: bit. ly/1QWoW85 (Copy & paste that into your address bar, and delete the space after the dot)

P.P.S. What's cool is that, if you zoom out, you can see that the larger boulder tumbled down the hill side, leaving a trail:



you are the best!!!!!



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 12:40 AM
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It's worth pointing out that there are always other sources of information if you want to double check something on the lunar surface.

Lunar Orbiter photographs from the 1960s are available here:

www.lpi.usra.edu...

and by mission here

www.lpi.usra.edu...

Lots of the Orbiter photographs were published in hard copy during the 1960s (I have two excellent books of photos, as well as a number of Lunar Atlases from the 1960s that use Orbiter images), so they are a good counter to anyone trying to pass off Photoshopped images as real.
There are some decent high resolution images taken by Soviet probes from the same era:

mentallandscape.com...

With Zond 8 following a trajectory from Mare Orientale to Aitken.

China has a lot of stuff online, as long as your browser can translate it:

moon.bao.ac.cn...

I haven't been able to get their map to work for some time, which is annoying!

India's Chandrayaan imagery is available here:

issdc.gov.in...

You need to register to browse the data, which is easy enough. The software they provide to view their images is pretty flaky, but once you figure it out it is possible to extract high quality images in conjunction with something like Photoshop.

My advice to anyone who sees something odd, or has found someone else claiming something odd, is always to check these other sources.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 01:28 AM
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a reply to: onebigmonkey
Old imagery (such as from the Lunar Orbiter) is sadly low-rez and of poor quality.

Surprisingly, imagery from Apollo panoramic cameras is very high-rez, rivalling that of the LRO: wms.lroc.asu.edu...

The trick is finding these images. For this, I use the other LRO site: wms.lroc.asu.edu...



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 02:02 AM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: wildespace




Here's another view, and the shadows allow you to estimate the shape of the objects:

That rock at frame center is hovering.


Lunar Flymo cutting the lunar grass perhaps?



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 02:03 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: onebigmonkey
Old imagery (such as from the Lunar Orbiter) is sadly low-rez and of poor quality.

Surprisingly, imagery from Apollo panoramic cameras is very high-rez, rivalling that of the LRO: wms.lroc.asu.edu...

The trick is finding these images. For this, I use the other LRO site: wms.lroc.asu.edu...


I've had lots of fun with the Panoramic images - when you download the gigabyte tiles that make up the images on the site you link to the detail is incredible (rivalling the LRO) - good enough to make out the changes in surface details as Apollo missions progressed:

onebigmonkey.com...

The search facility at the Apollo Image Atlas site I linked to is good to work out roughly which images you need to be looking at.

I've been told that NASA deliberately downplayed the quality of the Panoramic Camera images so that the Soviets wouldn't know exactly how good their cameras were!

I'm sure you know already, but the original Lunar Orbiter image tapes are being re-scanned by the Lunar Orbiter Image Project:

sservi.nasa.gov...

and some of the recovered data is quite amazing.

Regardless of quality they are still a useful resource. For example, the claimed lunar base at Zeeman crater (from stitching errors of Clementine images in Google Moon) is not there on the Orbiter photographs.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 02:12 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

I like photos 3 and 4 where the whitish coloured rock on the right appears to have rolled there. Awkwardly but .



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 05:26 AM
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originally posted by: scubagravy
a reply to: wildespace

I like photos 3 and 4 where the whitish coloured rock on the right appears to have rolled there. Awkwardly but .

Yes, it rolled down a rather steep slope: target.lroc.asu.edu...

You can find many such boulder trails on the Moon.



posted on Dec, 30 2015 @ 05:31 AM
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a reply to: wildespace

Rolled from what mate ? erosion ?

I'd imagine it is a rather rock that one
edit on 30/12/2015 by scubagravy because: (no reason given)



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