It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

REPORT: Nearly half of public colleges restrict student speech

page: 1
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 08:52 PM
link   
An organization called the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education has been watching the higher education standards concerning free speech deteriorate.

They have noticed an onslaught of no-free-speech amplify beyond comprehension.

The organization claims to have won several court cases involving speech suppression.

It seems many schools are even a little belligerent when it comes to actually "seeing" the policies that govern speech.

Looks like many big schools are running their own countries and disregarding the U.S. Constitution.


REPORT: Nearly half of public colleges restrict student speech


An annual report on speech policies at major colleges and universities finds that while some progress was made toward lifting speech restrictions this year, much work remains to be done.

In the 2016 edition of “Spotlight on Speech Codes,” published annually since 2009, the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE) gives a “red light” label—signifying at least one substantial speech restriction—to 49.3 percent of the 440 schools it reviewed, representing a slight improvement over last year, when 55 percent of schools received the failing grade.

In order to earn a red light rating, a school must have “at least one policy that both clearly and substantially restricts freedom of speech, or that bars public access to its speech-related policies by requiring a university login and password for access.” FIRE further specifies that a red light policy must be both “clear,” meaning its consequences do not depend on how it is applied or enforced, as well as “broadly applicable to campus expression.”



Who *DO* these people think they are anyway?

What are school policy makers so afraid of?

The "Fear-Factors" apply





posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:04 PM
link   
a reply to: xuenchen




Looks like many big schools are running their own countries and disregarding the U.S. Constitution.


While a college restricting speech sucks it isn't a constitutional issue.



Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


A college is neither congress nor the government.
edit on 28-12-2015 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:07 PM
link   
a reply to: xuenchen

thats why i dont talk at college unless its on the low



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:09 PM
link   
I thought higher education was private.

Funny though, in all my life school or otherwise, I've pretty much always said whatever the hell I wanted. The only time I've ever experienced censorship was on ATS.

ETA- not meant as a jest to ATS of course. Just sharing an observation.
edit on 28-12-2015 by Rosinitiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:12 PM
link   
a reply to: xuenchen

Another fine example of our freedoms being flushed down the toilet!



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:15 PM
link   
a reply to: xuenchen

They're teaching students that they can control speech, free expression.

A generation is being brought up learning to obey.



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: xuenchen




Looks like many big schools are running their own countries and disregarding the U.S. Constitution.


While a college restricting speech sucks it isn't a constitutional issue.



Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


A college is neither congress nor the government.


So public education organizations don't have to adhere to Constitutional amendments?



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: DBCowboy
a reply to: xuenchen

They're teaching students that they can control speech, free expression.

A generation is being brought up learning to obey.


A generation? Mmm......I don't know. I'm quite certain at this point, it's the whole purpose of "speech"



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:24 PM
link   

originally posted by: DBCowboy

originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: xuenchen




Looks like many big schools are running their own countries and disregarding the U.S. Constitution.


While a college restricting speech sucks it isn't a constitutional issue.



Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


A college is neither congress nor the government.


So public education organizations don't have to adhere to Constitutional amendments?


The government can not limit free speech nor can the government make laws limiting speech. That is what the constitution says.

The constitution doesn't limit your employer, school, church, private business, ATS, etc from making rules about what can be said within their scope.

Freedom of speech is the right to communicate one's opinions and ideas without fear of government retaliation or censorship government retaliation or censorship.
edit on 28-12-2015 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:27 PM
link   
a reply to: Grimpachi

So schools could allow prayer if they so decided. Correct?



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:29 PM
link   
a reply to: DBCowboy

If by school you mean college then yes.

As far as I know both high school and college allows prayer. It just isn't initiated by the staff ie (public employees).
edit on 28-12-2015 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:31 PM
link   
a reply to: Grimpachi

Why not high schools?



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:33 PM
link   
a reply to: DBCowboy

Tell me about your constitutional rights when you were at high school.



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:39 PM
link   
a reply to: Grimpachi

The point I'm trying to make is that institutions that receive government funds act as extension of government.

Public schools have to adhere to separation of church and state.

Public colleges are public schools, paid with tax payer monies and government funds. Shouldn't they also work within the same confines as high schools?

And if they should, then wouldn't a curtailment of free speech be indicative of government approval?



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:45 PM
link   

originally posted by: Grimpachi
a reply to: xuenchen




Looks like many big schools are running their own countries and disregarding the U.S. Constitution.


While a college restricting speech sucks it isn't a constitutional issue.



Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.


A college is neither congress nor the government.


If the college is funded by the Gov't, it would seem reasonable that the Constitution would apply to the subsidized entities. Else face lose that funding?



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:47 PM
link   
a reply to: DBCowboy

The constitution says congress (notice the bold I have bolded it several times for a reason) shall make no law.

I have also stated that college is not congress. They are a public entity sort of like public utility. You can't go into a public utility and blab whatever you want, you would be removed. Colleges can make rules as well as high schools.



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 09:51 PM
link   
a reply to: Grimpachi

The 1st Amendment gets used as a reason why government funded high schools cannot have prayer.

Yet the 1st Amendment is ignored when government funded colleges inhibit free speech.

And you can justify both positions at the same time?



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 10:00 PM
link   
a reply to: DBCowboy

I have already said prayer is allowed in school maybe you missed that. Students can pray and do pray at schools.

Prayer cannot be sponsored/directed by government employees.

-----------------------------

Constitutional free speech can entail handing out fliers stating that heroin use is good for society and expanding the mind. Te government i.e. congress/state legislature can not limit that, but a school can within their scope of influence.
edit on 28-12-2015 by Grimpachi because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 10:02 PM
link   
a reply to: xuenchen

I wouldn't say colleges limit free speech it just that the social justice warriors have silenced the dialogue. anyone with an opposing opinion are shut down with buzz words like bigot, racist, republican, sexist, ignorant, redneck etc.


edit on 28-12-2015 by JDmOKI because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2015 @ 10:05 PM
link   
Those paying the bills also know that certain thresholds of student free speech can effect the bottom line.
I would follow the money on this one as well.



new topics

top topics



 
5
<<   2 >>

log in

join