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Are Blacks Being Oppressed in America? - A Critical Analysis

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posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 07:39 AM
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According to The Counted, 1,046 people have been killed by police in 2015 alone. Of this number, 265 (25.3%) have been black. In no way has the killing been evenly distributed among the races, with 523 (50%) of those killed being white. While this may look at first glance like whites are being targeted, it is important to bear in mind that whites make up a little over 60% of the total population, whereas blacks make up only a bit over 13% of the population. So, are analysts correct when they say blacks are twice as likely to be killed than whites? From this statistic alone, it is impossible to make such a conclusion, because it ignores another important factor – run-ins with the police. When someone says blacks are twice as likely to be killed by police than whites, what we should be thinking of is run-ins with police.

So, who is more likely to have encounters with the police? It is no secret that police tend to patrol more impoverished neighborhoods. The reason for this is clear – poor neighborhoods tend to be areas with higher crime rates, often related to gang activity. The vast majority of these neighborhoods are predominantly black. In these neighborhoods, there tends to be a fear of police among the black population that any encounter will end up with them getting beaten, thrown in prison, or killed. This fear is so built up into the psyche that blacks in impoverished areas tend to run from police, implicating themselves as guilty in the process. For even more insight into why blacks often do not trust cops, click here.

Is it fair to say that blacks have a good reason to fear being in trouble with the police? The answer is yes – but it has little to do with racism. While racism may play a role in the attitudes of a small minority of police, the largest reason blacks in impoverished areas have for fearing police is that they are guilty of something. Many have outstanding low-level warrants for crimes such as curfew violation, traffic fines, and unpaid child support. (Source)

What about the assertion that blacks are being kept down by institutionalized racism. After all, when we talk about crime being committed by mostly black people, we must also consider the fact that most of the blacks committing crimes are poor. The question then becomes which is the better indicator of crime – race or wealth? We must consider here the fact that it isn’t only blacks who live in poverty. In fact, far more whites than blacks receive government assistance, yet far less crime is being committed in white neighborhoods. So, while we can see on one hand that being poor does not mean a person is necessarily more likely to commit a crime, we need only look at the many successful blacks to understand that being black is also not an indicator for crime. Why then is it that 3% of all black males are incarcerated and one-third of all black males can expect to be in prison at least once during their lifetimes?

We now turn to an uncomfortable truth – perhaps the single largest factor in being a criminal is being poor and black. By no means do I wish to insinuate being poor and black means that one is a criminal. However, when we look at the statistics, the numbers are alarming. From 1980-2008, a full 93% of black homicide victims were murdered by other black people. (Source) This number clearly indicates that the single greatest threat to black loss of life is not a racist system, as some would have you believe, but gang warfare. In fact, a Gallup poll shows that from 2005-2013, the number of blacks who feel unfairly treated by police has been going down and blacks are 50/50 in their view of incarceration of blacks, with half feeling the arrests were deserved and half feeling discrimination played a role.

So, where are these claims of oppression stemming from? At this point it becomes necessary to introduce a cold truth: blacks, by and large, feel entitled. This is not meant in a derogatory way – it is how most have been raised and is fully ingrained into their consciousness. Tellingly, 48% of blacks believe slavery is a major factor in current average wealth levels for blacks in the United States, while only 14% believe it to be no factor at all. Perhaps even more pertinent to the question of feeling entitled is that monetary reparations are supported by 59% of blacks with 63% of blacks in favor of special education and job training for descendants of slaves. This, of course, completely ignores the fact that paying out reparations could cost well into the trillions of dollars.

Yes, institutionalized racism has been a part of American history. First the blacks had to deal with slavery. Then they gained their freedom because of a man who was as racist as they get. Free, many blacks moved north where they found that although they weren’t slaves, they weren’t particularly welcome either. Segregation, which lasted in some States all the way up to the 1970s, told blacks in no uncertain terms that they were inferior to whites. One need only do a short Google search to find out about various injustices blacks have suffered – from segregated military companies and inhumane experiments to the alleged introduction by the employers of coc aine to black employees to make them work better. No one in their right mind would think that blacks haven’t suffered in the past. However, therein lay the key word – the past. The fact is that blacks no longer have the various obstacles of the past blocking their way. The single greatest obstacle to blacks has now become their incorrect belief that the “system” is out to get them. This belief is exacerbated by biased media coverage which tends to portray everything in terms of race and has far more coverage of blacks being brutalized by police than they do of police abuse against any other race.

This innate fear of living in a completely racist society is made worse still by well-meaning whites who do not fully understand the situation and are unwilling or unable to look beyond the question of race to see why blacks have a higher crime rate than any other race. For these whites, the black man is held down by the institutionalized racism he fears and when he hears whites confirming that this racism exists on such a large scale, that fear grows and becomes more deeply rooted.


edit on 5-12-2015 by scorpio84 because: fixed link

edit on 5-12-2015 by scorpio84 because: fixed yet another link

edit on 5-12-2015 by scorpio84 because: linking can be annoying



+2 more 
posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 07:42 AM
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NO !!!
It's not about race !
Or being poor!
It's how your raised!
What kind of values are instilled in you as a child!
edit on 5-12-2015 by DEANORULES24 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 07:43 AM
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So does a greater tendency among poor blacks to commit crimes mean that police are not overstepping their bounds or that police brutality is justifiable? No. In fact, Tom McKay, who surveyed cases of resisting arrest logged by the NYPD found that 40% of those cases were filed by just 5% of the entire force. This led him to astutely suggest that those 5% could be more likely to be involved in police abuse and ought to be monitored.

When all the data is looked at together, we are forced to admit that the run-ins blacks have with police is often due to them having committed crimes (as is the case with most run-ins with police, regardless of race). Also, police brutality does not apply only to blacks as the media and some well-intentioned people would have you believe – it is something that can affect anyone, regardless of skin color. Police brutality isn’t about racism – it’s about a power trip that a minority of cops go on. So, should blacks be trusting of police? Basically, yes. According to Tim Dees, a retired police officer and professor of Criminal Justice, a sure-fire way to get on the wrong side of a discussion with the cops is to be argumentative and accuse them of racism.

Let’s be abundantly clear – racism exists in this country and it probably always will. Those who say they are colorblind are kidding themselves. We all see color (except for the blind and those who are actually colorblind). In fact, it is fair to say that there are many differences between the races. We need not shun those differences and pretend they don’t exist – in fact, our nation will be stronger if we embrace them and realize we can all learn from each other. In no way do any of the statistics justify cold-blooded murder, as was the case with Walter Scott. However, let’s see the problem for what it really is – an unwillingness to stop looking at the past and start looking toward the future.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 07:50 AM
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a reply to: DEANORULES24

I'd say success is determined by motivation more than any other factor. It doesn't have to do with any racial barriers.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 07:50 AM
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Love these statistics.

They always point out race and never look at the economic factors.

How gullible do you have to be to believe that it's about race?

Blacks aren't more likely to be shot by police. Poor people are.


+1 more 
posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 07:53 AM
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a reply to: scorpio84
What the statistics don't want to tell you is that both the black fellas and white fellas gunned down share a common trait - even with the other races gunned down.

They were most likely all involved in criminal activity. (Except the kids and family pets)

Criminals come in black and white and all shades in between - and just like politicians they too are scum.

You may need to see a doctor, I think you have a dose of propaganditis. The measure of a mans character has nothing to do with his skin colour and everything to do with his ego and pride.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 07:56 AM
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+4 more 
posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 08:01 AM
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We have a black president.
A black man achieved the highest elected position in the country.
Oprah owned television for decades.

Just think what they would have accomplished if they had not been oppressed.

Ha!



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 08:03 AM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

The fact that they've been involved in criminal activity was a major focus of this article. However, please pay attention to the topic - the question of whether or not blacks are being oppressed. Had I been writing a piece on police brutality in general, I certainly would have included statistics more encompassing of other races/economic factors.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: scorpio84

Sure - if blacks are being oppressed then it is being done primarily by other blacks or even themselves on an individual level due to their ego and gangsta thug mentality and if blacks are not being oppressed it's because they are an integral part of their society and their ego and pride has enabled them to rise above the ghetto culture.

I hope that's paying attention enough for you.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 08:13 AM
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A person race is based on the biological fact of skin color. Racism is like hating someone for their eye and hair color.

That being said, I do see the OP's point, yet I can't help but feel this is more about culture than race. Poor, black Americans have a culture that tends to breed tough violent men who feel the world is against them. Writers like Richard Wright and James Baldwin explore this in their amazing works of literature.

So, I don't believe that the criminality of an individual is based on the biological fact of skin color. The poor of all ethnicities in America are raised in fear and ignorance because politicians just want lazy voters who ask few questions. Add to this that the media will only blame race or religion for violence and not the real cause, mental illness, we are left with more people hating more people.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 08:18 AM
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a reply to: Sublimecraft

No, the point is that the supposed institutionalized racism is not there. Yes, there are some racists out there - but it isn't at a level that blacks couldn't get ahead. The factors holding impoverished blacks down (and I apply this in general terms):

-looking to the past
-ingrained fear of police
-criminal tendency
-lack of motivation due to sense of entitlement
and one I didn't cover: welfare



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 08:21 AM
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a reply to: hubrisinxs

Just to be clear, the point I tried to show was that blacks are not being oppressed and are responsible for their own destinies.




I can't help but feel this is more about culture than race. Poor, black Americans have a culture that tends to breed tough violent men who feel the world is against them.


My research and my own observations would confirm that.




The poor of all ethnicities in America are raised in fear and ignorance because politicians just want lazy voters who ask few questions. Add to this that the media will only blame race or religion for violence and not the real cause, mental illness, we are left with more people hating more people.


Good points.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 08:33 AM
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originally posted by: scorpio84
Let’s be abundantly clear – racism exists in this country and it probably always will. Those who say they are colorblind are kidding themselves. We all see color (except for the blind and those who are actually colorblind). In fact, it is fair to say that there are many differences between the races. We need not shun those differences and pretend they don’t exist – in fact, our nation will be stronger if we embrace them and realize we can all learn from each other.



Good thread.

That is the elephant in the room, that and all the going around trying not

to stand on egg shells, for fear of offending, which it appears in this day and

age is super easy.


Positive discrimination (which is a misnomer) where companies and jobs

have to have a percentage of blacks/coloureds fill jobs, and this also applies

to women in an effort to combat inequality. Is IMO OFFENSIVE.


Equality and discrimination cannot be given it has to be earned. I speak from

the experience of having worked for over 20years in an all *male* work place

invioroment as the only female.


If I couldn't keep up it would have been that I couldn't hack it ..... and not

because I was a woman!! same should apply to a black, that they couldn't

hack it and not because they are black.

But that's a hard one because as you alluded to in your post they do have a

historical sense of entitlement.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 08:55 AM
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a reply to: eletheia

Yep - it's much easier to fall back on the racism/sexism card than it is to admit to just not being cut out for the task. Actually, I'd argue that women have it far worse than blacks.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 09:06 AM
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a reply to: scorpio84




The factors holding impoverished blacks down (and I apply this in general terms):

-looking to the past
-ingrained fear of police
-criminal tendency
-lack of motivation due to sense of entitlement
and one I didn't cover: welfare


This analysis is a bit derogatory, but I understand what you are getting at.

The reason we have impoverished areas with a high percentage of blacks is due to the poor conditions that they came out of from this countries past and each generation perpetuates it. I don't think this an excuse, but it's most certainly a factor.

IMO, the most damning thing in black communities is the lack of fathers to raise children(72% are raised in single parent households). This leads to welfare going up as single mothers in impoverished areas are in need of it and it's often easier than working(30% of blacks are on welfare at any given point) . Children raised by single mothers are at much greater risk for drug abuse, incarceration, lack of education, depression, suicide, teenage pregnancies, etc.

Those children grow up to do the same thing to their children. This isn't just a black issue, you can see it in all races and it's only getting worse.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 09:14 AM
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a reply to: ghostrager

The analysis isn't derogatory - it's honest. If being honest about the situation is tantamount to being a racist, then call me David Duke. I definitely agree that poverty is cyclical.




IMO, the most damning thing in black communities is the lack of fathers to raise children(72% are raised in single parent households).


I believe that number, but here at ATS we demand links to sources when stats are given.

And where are the fathers? Oh yeah - in jail for criminal activity, dead from gang violence, or on the streets killing someone/selling drugs/ being a general deadbeat.

I'm just upset that the one black man with the soundest advice for black people just has to be a rapist



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: scorpio84

Nothing honest about a thread skipping the generational abuse and oppression commited on the blacks in america. Check the statistics on white crime and white on white murder.



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 10:31 AM
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a reply to: scorpio84

I pretty much see what you are saying, but I have to ask, if this is this case, why aren't we seeing Native Americans and Jews acting this way, or actually much worse? They were treated far worse yet they are completely different in how they act or perceive things.

Pcg



posted on Dec, 5 2015 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: OhOkYeah

I have an issue with the idea that economic factors cause poor people to choose a life of crime or are doomed to live a life of poverty. My family grew up poor. Our entire family of 3 girls and I as the only boy were raised by 1 parent, our mother. My dad passed away when I was 2 years-old. We lived within our means and I being the only boy, did the chores fathers normally do.

My mother always stressed to us the importance of hard work and getting an education. We were expected to do well in school. A's were not expected, but failing or getting D's were resulted in being grounded for 2 weeks. Low income people like my family had a much better opportunity to get state grants to attend college than middle class families! It's the same today! As a result all 4 children in our family received college degrees and pulled ourselves out of poverty.

Being a retired high school teacher, I unfortunately would have a battle on my hands to devise fun and new teaching methods to help motivate poor blacks and whites to take their education seriously. Occasionally I would stop a lesson and talk with my class about my up bringing and explain to them how education raised my family out of poverty.
Unfortunately, a lot of these talks fell on deaf ears. The laziness and apathetic nature of these kids were pitiful.

I had an electronic jeopardy game in my lab where I had an electronic score board with each students name lit up with their score. The each had a hand-held buzzer just like on the game show! All their terminology was learned using this fun and competitive game. I gave away school t-shirts and prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place. Sounds like fun doesn't it?
It was sad, because I would always have a handful of students who didn't want to play or never took it serious.

We need to stop making excuses for kids growing up in poverty. It starts with the parents and having self-motivation to want a better life for yourself. People choose their own destiny. Not having the nicer things in life and living in a nicer neighborhood was motivation enough to pull myself out of poverty. The government programs are there for them to give them a step to pull themselves out of poverty, yet these families choose not to take advantage of it.

If people don't have self-determination, motivation, education, and a positive attitude, your destined to continue on the path of poverty.



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