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Orionids Peak Tonight

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posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 08:43 PM
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Tonight is the peak of the Orionid meteor shower. Best viewing is going to be after 2 AM, after moonset (yep, that's a word). NASA is predicting a ZHR (Zenithal Hourly Rate, meteors per hour basically) 20 while Slooh Observatory is predicting as much as 30. The Orionid meteor shower is one of two showers resulting from the Earth passing through debris left by Halley's Comet as it traverses the inner solar system on it's 75 year orbit. The name comes from the proximity of the radiant, the area of the sky from where the meteors appear to originate, to the constellation Orion.

Radiant, image source: Earthsky.org

If you miss this one, there's still the South Taurids (peaks Nov. 4-5), North Taurids (peaks Nov. 12-13), Leonids (peaks Nov. 17-18) and the Geminids (peaks Dec. 13-14).

The Taurids tend to be unimpressive in terms of volume but the Geminid shower is consistently prodigious and typically has a max ZHR over 100. The Leonids hold a special place for me though as the 2001 meteor storm was one of the most impressive things I've ever seen in the sky. During the peak that year, max ZHR was something > 1000 (16 per minute).

It was simply unbelievable; fireball after fireball streaking overhead and leaving shimmery trails. Many were large enough that we could see pieces sloughing off which looked quite a bit like sparking. Perhaps even more interesting, we could also hear a bacon (mmmmm) sizzling noise of sorts when some of them were zooming overhead (which no doubt added to suggestion of 'sparking'). I'd never heard a meteor before and I haven't since. What I've since learned is that the sound we were hearing wasn't actually coming from meteors directly, which makes sense because there wasn't a delay between what we were seeing and hearing. It wasn't discovered until the late 70's that the sound is actually caused by VLF radio waves generated by the meteors interacting with objects in an observer's surroundings what act as tranducers, a phenomena known as electrophonics. You can read some other accounts of the 2001 Leonids here.

Now that I've nerded out, anyone else want to share a story?
edit on 2015-10-21 by theantediluvian because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 08:47 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

I'm good enjoyed yours



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 08:59 PM
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Cool info and story... thanks.

Someone I know was on a nearby mountain top for an actual meteor storm in the 1980's. He, too, reported the "sizzling" noise and there were way too many to count for nearly two minutes.

They originated from a point in the night sky that was nearly overhead. They sat back and watched, reporting that the spray looked like the "warp speed" effect from sci-fi flicks... like the Earth was speeding through space (faster than it already does).

Meteors are cool... when small, anyway... and so is 'nerding out.'



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 09:48 PM
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originally posted by: Hyperia
a reply to: theantediluvian

I'm good enjoyed yours



a reply to: Baddogma


They originated from a point in the night sky that was nearly overhead. They sat back and watched, reporting that the spray looked like the "warp speed" effect from sci-fi flicks... like the Earth was speeding through space (faster than it already does)


Now that's cool! I would say in the case of the 2001 Leonid storm, it seemed a bit more like the early stages of an apocalypse. Also something about it made me think of the story The Lonesome Death of Jordy Verrill from the movie Creepshow — the one that starred Stephen King:




posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 10:46 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

What's the odds of a space rock from this meteor shower hitting someone's head?


Peace



posted on Oct, 21 2015 @ 11:37 PM
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Tonight, when? Central time what?

It's 11:40PM Central time right now, and I don't see #. It would help listing time zones...

"Check it out tonight." Cool, what time should I begin looking at the sky in Central time?
edit on 22-10-2015 by Kromlech because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 12:13 AM
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originally posted by: Kromlech
Tonight, when? Central time what?

It's 11:40PM Central time right now, and I don't see #. It would help listing time zones...

"Check it out tonight." Cool, what time should I beginning looking at the sky in Central time?


Central time here as well. However looking over the OP info he posted a link to the following site and it had some more info.


Earth Sky

When should I watch for Orionid meteors? The best time for viewing for these fast-streaking Orionid meteors is between midnight and dawn. That time holds true no matter what time zone you’re in. In 2015, virtually no moonlight will interfere during predawn hours, as the waxing moon sets before the peak hours of the shower.
edit on 22-10-2015 by OzManHero because: spelling issue



posted on Oct, 22 2015 @ 08:13 AM
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Question.

Is there an area that may see it better? Like Canada vs Florida?


(post by Heyhotstuff removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Nov, 3 2015 @ 01:30 PM
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a reply to: theantediluvian

Thanks for posting the information!

I know this is a stupid question, but - is the "peak" time the same for all parts of the earth??

Sunday night we were in the jacuzzi at night and saw the most awesome meteors! I saw one that had a brilliant tail when it streaked across. I don't keep informed of meteor showers, but I think I should. I live in a place away from the lights of cities and at a high altitude -great for skywatching.

I'm rambling. Thanks for posting the info and link. Star and flag.



posted on Nov, 3 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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I just saw a nice meteor, that also had a little burst of greenish light. And it's not even any meteor shower happening right now, is there?

I think people should look up more, they might see such interesting things like shooting stars or ice halos.



posted on Nov, 3 2015 @ 04:40 PM
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I didn't read the rest of the replies and info on times.
My apologies!




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