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F-35 accident pilot awarded Kolligian trophy

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posted on Sep, 29 2015 @ 01:37 AM
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Capt Timothy K. Killham, of the 58th Flying Training Squadron was awarded the Koren Kolligian Jr trophy for his actions in saving himself and his aircraft after the F-35 he was taking off in caught fire during the takeoff roll. On June 23, 2014 Capt Killham was in the process of taking off for a training flight, when the aircraft suffered catastrophic engine failure, resulting in major damage to the aircraft, and an intense fire in the aft fuselage.

Capt Killham was able to slow the aircraft, and bring it to a stop on the runway, and safely egress the aircraft. The Kolligian trophy is awarded to aircrew members who by extraordinary skill, exceptional alertness, ingenuity, or proficiency, averted accidents or minimized the seriousness of the accidents in terms of injury, loss of life, aircraft or property damage. By stopping the aircraft on the runway, the Captain was able to minimize any property damage, and potential loss of life that could have happened if the aircraft got airborne.

The trophy is named for 1st Lt Koren Kolligian Jr. He was flying a T-33 that went missing off the coast of California on September 14, 1955. He was officially listed as Missing in the line of duty.


WASHINGTON (AFNS) -- Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III awarded a 58th Flying Training Squadron fighter jet pilot the Koren Kolligian Jr. trophy for flight safety in a ceremony at the Pentagon Sept. 23.

Capt. Timothy K. Killham, an F-35A Lightning II pilot, was given the award that recognizes outstanding feats of airmanship by an individual aircrew member, who by extraordinary skill, exceptional alertness, ingenuity, or proficiency, averted accidents or minimized the seriousness of the accidents in terms of injury, loss of life, aircraft or property damage.

Killham experienced engine malfunction on his jet during a takeoff June 23, 2014, at Eglin Air Force Base, Florida. With the aircraft engulfed in flames, he skillfully controlled the plane, aborted takeoff, and got himself to safety — a move that saved his life and the aircraft.

www.af.mil...




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