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We Will Never Know What's Inside A Black Hole!

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posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 10:55 AM
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Let's take what we "know" about black holes so far. They have immense gravity so it stands to reason that as objects get closer to it times slows down, a lot. Now suppose we have the technology to enter this black hole. The person enters it and emerges a week later or so, however, time for the rest of humanity could have been 1 million years. Humanity could be long extinct, as could Earth and its solar system. This brave explorer is now the only person left who knows what was inside the hole but he has nobody left to tell!

Of course, we have no idea to what extent a black hole would distort time, but since its gravity can control galaxies it stands to reason that time would be completely messed up. So, is it possible that we will ever find out what's really inside a black hole?




posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 10:56 AM
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a reply to: Sharted


So, is it possible that we will ever find out what's really inside a black hole?


Well, math really gives us the best idea we can have, without sending people in there to see.

And that just sounds like crazy talk all the way around.

Perhaps if one day we can create miniature ones in a lab that are stable, we might be able to study them further. But that's a scary thought in itself.

I don't really have enough scientific knowledge of the whole thing to give a concrete answer, but that's where I'm at so far.

~Tenth



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 10:57 AM
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a reply to: Sharted

I think at the center of every black hole qualifying as "super massive" ,is Morgan Freeman's head spinning perpetually. But I'm taking a shot in the dark here I could be wrong.
edit on 5-8-2015 by TechniXcality because: (no reason given)


+2 more 
posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 10:59 AM
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I propose a mission.

A starship consisting of a crew made up of Justin Bieber, the Kardasians+ Keyne west, caitlyn Jenner, lindsay Lohan the entire bush and Clinton family's and mylie cyrus be sent into the event horizon of a black hole.....

A follow up mission comprised of Donald Trump, murdoch, Simon Cowell , Tony Blair, Shia leboef , Obama and the rothchilds would soon follow

edit on 5-8-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)

edit on 5-8-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:00 AM
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I personally like the movie Interstellar's approach to it....that was quite an amazing journey.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:02 AM
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a reply to: crazyewok

Though I have disdain for all mentioned, surely they don't ALL have to be American. I'm sure some brave scientist such as ours named;from the U.K could join the ranks.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:03 AM
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originally posted by: Sharted
Let's take what we "know" about black holes so far. They have immense gravity so it stands to reason that as objects get closer to it times slows down, a lot. Now suppose we have the technology to enter this black hole. The person enters it and emerges a week later or so, however, time for the rest of humanity could have been 1 million years.
The problem isn't that humanity would be gone, the problem is that if light can't emerge, there's no way for a person to emerge. So it's like the roach motel, you can check in but you can never check out. But the guy falling in might know what's inside before he dies, though there's no way he could tell anybody else, not even a million years later, not ever.

It depends on the size of the black hole too, he would probably die from "spaghettification" in smaller black holes before he could figure out what was inside, but in really large supermassive black holes, I don't think that would be as much of a problem. That may sound counter-intuitive because of the stronger gravity of the supermassive black holes, but the reason you spaghettify less right after passing the event horizon of supermassive black holes is due to the immense size of the event horizon.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:04 AM
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originally posted by: TechniXcality
a reply to: crazyewok

Though I have disdain for all mentioned, surely they don't ALL have to be American. I'm sure some brave scientist such as ours named;from the U.K could join the ranks.


Hey Biebers a canadian.


I have changed it so there is a international follow up team of Americans, Brits, Australians and Jews

edit on 5-8-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:12 AM
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I've always thought that black holes may be a portal/passageway to another universe.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 11:51 AM
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Well, the math tells us a fair bit, but I'm not so wrapped up in mathematical absolutes that I would say it's lock, stock & barrel solved yet. For all we know, there are loopholes in the laws of physics for black holes that we've yet to discover. It's entirely possible that the entire idea is completely misunderstood and they don't actually work the way math says they do.

We will never know for certain until we send something in one, and figure out how to get the readings from within back to us. And that's assuming every black hole obeys the same rules.
edit on 8/5/2015 by Nyiah because: typo



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 12:01 PM
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I've always likened space itself to that of oceans, when I think about it, it just seems to make sense. But i have a couple of question because i just don't know. First, what happens to matter after it enters,does it get compressed or does it pass through and exit as energy. Second, its kind of hard to explain, how is it oriented,( like a whirlpool is seen on the surface of a body of water) do they have a general orientation in space? I ask because I think someone here at ATS might have some type of insight. I've always seen black holes as cosmic whirlpools if that makes sense, either way interesting question.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 12:04 PM
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a reply to: crazyewok

Why such hatred for Shia Lebouf? Wow, all the names you listed was like yep, yep, yep, yep...Wait, Shia Lebouf??? lol.....Oh well throw him out there too, let's get this black hole thing figured out...People see a movie and then these questions come up...FYI, Matthew McConehy did not go to a black hole and seek the 5th dimension in real life....



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 12:05 PM
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a reply to: Chrisfishenstein

I find him pretentious

edit on 5-8-2015 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 12:07 PM
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a reply to: Sharted

If something goes down your mouth it gets digested and comes out another black hole vastly different than how it entered. Basically, the Universe has many black holes and nothing that goes in comes out the same as it went in.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 12:40 PM
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Nevermind
edit on 5-8-2015 by TechniXcality because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: Sharted

This might be true, even from a mathematical standpoint. The 0 and infinity problem that arises within the black hole keeps us from being able to come to a mathematical conclusion. String theory may be able to solve the math, but we may never be able to prove string theory.

Here is a link to a laymen explanation on the math for us non physicists.

www.fmbr.org...



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 12:56 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

I'm pretty sure that spaghettification happens regardless of the size of the black hole. Going by how it works and that gravity increases exponentially, the closer you get to the black hole. Plus the fact that things don't fall directly into a black hole, they orbit them and are slowly ripped apart because the forces of gravity on one side of the object are greater than the forces holding the object together as well as the gravity on the far side of the object.

By the way, it's thought that the rings around Jupiter and the other gas giants were formed pretty much the same way. A small object gets caught into the gas giant's orbit, then the force of gravity from the planet slowly rips it apart.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 01:38 PM
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originally posted by: Isurrender73
a reply to: Sharted

This might be true, even from a mathematical standpoint. The 0 and infinity problem that arises within the black hole keeps us from being able to come to a mathematical conclusion. String theory may be able to solve the math, but we may never be able to prove string theory.

Here is a link to a laymen explanation on the math for us non physicists.

www.fmbr.org...


Thank for the link, even though I only understood about half of it! Here is an excerpt to give people a taste:




The leading approach to unifying quantum theory and general relativity is string theory. In string theory each elemental particle is composed of a single string and all strings are identical. The "stuff" of all matter and all forces is the same. Differences between the particles arise because their respective strings undergo different resonant vibrational patterns -- giving them unique fingerprints. Hence, what appear to be different elementary particles are actually different notes on a fundamental string. In string theory zero has been banished from the universe; there is no such thing as zero distance or zero time. Hence, all the infinity problems of quantum mechanics are solved. But, there is a price that we must pay to banish zero and infinity. The size of a typical string in string theory is the Planck length, i.e., about 10-33 centimeters. This is over a thousand trillion times smaller that what the most advanced particle detection equipment can observe. Are these unifying theories, that describe the centers of black holes and explain the singularity of the big bang, becoming so far removed from experiment that we will never be able to determine their correctness? The models of the universe that string theorists and cosmologists develop might be mathematically precise, beautiful and consistent and might appear to explain the nature of the universe -- and yet be utterly wrong. Scientific models/theories, philosophies, and religions will continue to exist and be refined. However, because of zero and infinity, we can never have "proof". All that science can know is that the cosmos was spawned from nothing, and will return to the nothing from whence it came.



posted on Aug, 5 2015 @ 02:27 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: Arbitrageur

I'm pretty sure that spaghettification happens regardless of the size of the black hole. Going by how it works and that gravity increases exponentially, the closer you get to the black hole. Plus the fact that things don't fall directly into a black hole, they orbit them and are slowly ripped apart because the forces of gravity on one side of the object are greater than the forces holding the object together as well as the gravity on the far side of the object.

By the way, it's thought that the rings around Jupiter and the other gas giants were formed pretty much the same way. A small object gets caught into the gas giant's orbit, then the force of gravity from the planet slowly rips it apart.
Wikipedia explains what I'm talking about. The tidal forces at the event horizon of a 10 million solar mass black hole are the same tidal forces you're experiencing now on the Earth's surface, and you're not being spaghettified now, right?

en.wikipedia.org...

the tidal forces in the vicinity of the event horizon are significantly weaker for massive black holes. As with density, the tidal force on a body at the event horizon is inversely proportional to the square of the mass: a person on the surface of the Earth and one at the event horizon of a 10 million solar mass black hole experience about the same tidal force between their head and feet. Unlike with stellar mass black holes, one would not experience significant tidal force until very deep into the black hole.

But as I said it's a bit counterintuitive as someone unfamiliar with the physics might think bigger black hole, more mass, more spaghettification at the event horizon so this thinking is understandable, but is exactly the opposite of what is predicted.

edit on 201585 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Aug, 6 2015 @ 12:48 AM
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a reply to: Sharted

I've always theorised that black holes are wormholes to star nurseries. All that matter has to come from somewhere.



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