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Smatter: could supersymmetric particles form atoms?

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posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 11:55 AM
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Supersymmetry, in one iteration, is the theory that each particle in the Standard Model has a more massive counterpart with otherwise similar properties. For instance, the Selectron (very lazy naming scheme, particle people) is the Supersymmetric electron. Same negative charge, but considerably greater mass. And there are also Squarks, etc. Evidence for this theory has not been decisively detected. In most models, it is believed that the first run of the LHC should have had sufficient energy to produce supersymmetric particles, yet it showed nothing outside of the Standard Model.
While I am aware that I have vastly oversimplified my definition of Supersymmetry in this explanation, there is a good WP article about it here:
Supersymmetry

But the concept got me thinking. Is it possible for supersymmetric particles to coalesce into other particles? Such as protons and neutrons? What would supersymmetric matter be like compared to what we know? Just more massive but with otherwise similar properties? Or something else?
Could it even exist in the Universe we are familiar with?
What are your thoughts?




posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 12:49 PM
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a reply to: pfishy
One idea is that one or more supersymmetric particles could be part of the explanation for dark matter, but, until we know what dark matter is, we don't know what it is. We know what small parts of it are, like some baryonic matter such as brown dwarfs and other "MACHOs", but the majority is still a mystery:

home.web.cern.ch...

in many theories scientists predict the lighest supersymmetric particle to be stable and electrically neutral and to interact weakly with the particles of the Standard Model. These are exactly the characteristics required for dark matter, thought to make up most of the matter in the universe and to hold galaxies together. The Standard Model alone does not provide an explanation for dark matter. Supersymmetry is a framework that builds upon the Standard Model’s strong foundation to create a more comprehensive picture of our world. Perhaps the reason we still have some of these questions about the inner workings of the universe is because we have so far only seen half of the picture.
Weakly interacting particles are by definition hard to detect, because if they don't interact, how do you detect them? Some experiments are trying to detect them.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

What do you think about the theory that dark matter could be it's own antiparticle?



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 01:18 PM
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a reply to: pfishy
I'm in favor of ideas that allow us to design experiments to figure out what dark matter is.

Someone would have to explain to me how that idea would help accomplish that objective. If it doesn't, I'm not sure how it's helpful to propose that, even if it happened to be true.



posted on Jul, 29 2015 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: Arbitrageur

Well, in the theory, two dark matter particles (wimps, I believe, in this case) would annihilate upon contact releasing gamma frequency photons. An otherwise unexplainable surplus of gamma emissions in an area where the dark matter halo of a galaxy should be the most dense could be a potential indicator of this theory being correct, and therefore the theory of what the dark matter is composed of.




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