It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

metrology class starts monday....then in september six sigma

page: 1
4

log in

join
share:

posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:06 PM
link   
i cant wait man.
im so stoked.

ive been in quality a long time. been an inspector a long time..been through a lot of courses but never these. i am super excited.

been through metallography classes. various other inspection classes but im most excited for these.

just started the new job. loving it so far.
they want me to start doing process capabilities.
bouncing between the foundry side and the finished products side.

been dealing with companies and materials from france and south africa already.

for those that dont know

en.wikipedia.org...


Six Sigma seeks to improve the quality output of process by identifying and removing the causes of defects (errors) and minimizing variability in manufacturing and business processes. It uses a set of quality management methods, mainly empirical, statistical methods, and creates a special infrastructure of people within the organization ("Champions", "Black Belts", "Green Belts", "Yellow Belts", etc.) who are experts in these methods. Each Six Sigma project carried out within an organization follows a defined sequence of steps and has quantified value targets, for example: reduce process cycle time, reduce pollution, reduce costs, increase customer satisfaction, and increase profits


en.wikipedia.org...


Metrology is defined by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures (BIPM) as "the science of measurement, embracing both experimental and theoretical determinations at any level of uncertainty in any field of science and technology.




posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:32 PM
link   
Good job. I am a lean six sigma green belt with an associate in quality engineering. 25 years experience. I make good money so i hope this all works out good for you. It will be worth the PITA



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: 5pooky
Good job. I am a lean six sigma green belt with an associate in quality engineering. 25 years experience. I make good money so i hope this all works out good for you. It will be worth the PITA


nice.
im not going through lean six sigma.
i already do pretty good money wise.
i dont think its a pain either. im excited about it.
ive wanted to do six sigma for a while but im more excited about the metrology course.

i feel like the metrology is more for me while the six sigma is for them.
either way, its free schooling for me.

obviously you are in manufacturing but what area?
metals? textiles?

i am giving serious thought to enrolling in a material science program too



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 06:48 PM
link   
a reply to: Mugly

I did my apprenticeship in a metallurgy lab and loved every minute. Nearly got a job building neutron science experiments because of it (short listed to two, but unfortunately the older guy got the job). It would have been nearly my ideal job.

Go for it! The world is your oyster if you seek excellence in your field.




posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:18 PM
link   

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: Mugly

I did my apprenticeship in a metallurgy lab and loved every minute. Nearly got a job building neutron science experiments because of it (short listed to two, but unfortunately the older guy got the job). It would have been nearly my ideal job.

Go for it! The world is your oyster if you seek excellence in your field.



my i did 3 weeks metallurgy class, 1 on 1 with the senior quality engineer/metallurgist at my last spot and spent a year in the metal lab. i was doing inspection for a year then the lab. the lab was awesome.
ive must of run 25,000 samples through the spectrometer.
thousands of tensile tests. checking micro structure/physical properties.

i was soaking it up.

the spot i am at is focusing me more on measuring.
you know, precision with calipers and mics out to .001

i was on a steady climb. then i took an injury that put me out for a bit. took a job wrenching on cars thinking i didnt want to get back into that environment.
i guy i used to work with at the old spot gave my name at where he is and they put me on.

it is a world of difference.
i was dealing with gray iron and ductile iron before. now i am dealing with alloys, brass, copper...
our quality work is more precise cause we are finishing products as well.
the other spot we took it to a certain point and then shipped it to the customer and they finished it.

i love it cause i am getting paid to take these classes and its gonna bump my rate when i am finished. i would have gladly taken these classes and paid for them.

im planning my attack now. the guy training me is a very nice guy but i am already seeing all kinds of ways to make things more efficient. he's gone on friday so then i will start messing with my stuff.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:35 PM
link   
how long were your classes?

today in my class the guy called me a quality control warrior
never heard that



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 07:39 PM
link   

originally posted by: Mugly

originally posted by: chr0naut
a reply to: Mugly

I did my apprenticeship in a metallurgy lab and loved every minute. Nearly got a job building neutron science experiments because of it (short listed to two, but unfortunately the older guy got the job). It would have been nearly my ideal job.

Go for it! The world is your oyster if you seek excellence in your field.



my i did 3 weeks metallurgy class, 1 on 1 with the senior quality engineer/metallurgist at my last spot and spent a year in the metal lab. i was doing inspection for a year then the lab. the lab was awesome.
ive must of run 25,000 samples through the spectrometer.
thousands of tensile tests. checking micro structure/physical properties.

i was soaking it up.

the spot i am at is focusing me more on measuring.
you know, precision with calipers and mics out to .001

i was on a steady climb. then i took an injury that put me out for a bit. took a job wrenching on cars thinking i didnt want to get back into that environment.
i guy i used to work with at the old spot gave my name at where he is and they put me on.

it is a world of difference.
i was dealing with gray iron and ductile iron before. now i am dealing with alloys, brass, copper...
our quality work is more precise cause we are finishing products as well.
the other spot we took it to a certain point and then shipped it to the customer and they finished it.

i love it cause i am getting paid to take these classes and its gonna bump my rate when i am finished. i would have gladly taken these classes and paid for them.

im planning my attack now. the guy training me is a very nice guy but i am already seeing all kinds of ways to make things more efficient. he's gone on friday so then i will start messing with my stuff.


Yeah, when I was in the lab (temperature controlled & tooling quality machinery) I could hold to 10,000th/inch, quickly & consistently. Still proud of that, but I've been out of my trade for decades now & eyesight, manual dexterity & etc go downhill as you age.

Still got family and grand-kids now which are a higher priority and source of joy (not to mention that I'm supposed to retire, too).

"Do you see any truly competent workers? They will serve kings rather than working for ordinary people." Proverbs 22:29.


edit on 14/7/2015 by chr0naut because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 09:48 PM
link   
a reply to: Mugly

Have you come across any interesting hasteloys, fractionless copper or magnetically stirred and formed iron or steel?

Cheers - Dave



posted on Jul, 15 2015 @ 04:22 AM
link   
a reply to: bobs_uruncle

not as of yet.
the last spot i was at used electric arc furnaces.
the main alloys at the new spot are bronze and copper and they are continuous cast. ive only been there a few days and have not had a chance to dive into the properties of the alloys. i had a training class that took up an entire day.
i hit about 90 of our pieces with a handheld spectrometer the other day. i was noticing some interesting properties as it was burning the sample but thats about it.

my supervisor is on vacation till monday so i would expect next week i will get all my sheets of the alloys we pour, what material is in them, etc etc.

some of the bars i burned has titanium. i wasnt really expecting to see that in those pieces.



posted on Jul, 16 2015 @ 11:02 AM
link   

originally posted by: Mugly
a reply to: bobs_uruncle

not as of yet.
the last spot i was at used electric arc furnaces.
the main alloys at the new spot are bronze and copper and they are continuous cast. ive only been there a few days and have not had a chance to dive into the properties of the alloys. i had a training class that took up an entire day.
i hit about 90 of our pieces with a handheld spectrometer the other day. i was noticing some interesting properties as it was burning the sample but thats about it.

my supervisor is on vacation till monday so i would expect next week i will get all my sheets of the alloys we pour, what material is in them, etc etc.

some of the bars i burned has titanium. i wasnt really expecting to see that in those pieces.


I did a project ages ago using magnetic stirring for steel rod forming and wondered if the process escaped into the wild. Fractionless copper is neat, there are no surface cracks, I have a prototype from Japan, cost about 10 grand, used it for Mic cables in recording studio, zero noise. The hasteloys, they're fun, had an ashtray made out of hasteloys c, it can withstand 1100 degree C, 22% hydrochloric acid vapour.

I was regional engineer for Beckman for canada so I was involved with a lot of metallurgy and analytical chemistry.

Cheers - Dave
edit on 7/16.2015 by bobs_uruncle because: (no reason given)



new topics

top topics



 
4

log in

join