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Selling a beater car - advice?

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posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 06:11 AM
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a reply to: Galadriel

Ebay it.

Fill the trunk with beer, the back seat with balloons, the front seats with sweets, put cuddly toys on the roof etc etc, then write an honest but funny item description and see what happens.




posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 06:16 AM
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a reply to: PollyPeptide

a special tool for inner tie rods is not a must.
you can absolutely do it without a special tool.

i agree that it is an easy job putting tie rods on but i hate when people try to convince others they can get a book and do it.
it should be like that but its not.

someone said it only requires about 50 bucks in tools. honestly it is probably less than that but how will they know which size wrenches they need.

need a socket to loosen the nut on the stem of the tie rod. which size should they buy?
need a wrench to loosen the jam nut. which size should they buy?
need a wrench or a hook to twist the sleeve.
need a pair of needle nose or something to pull the pin out of the stem..

then what do they do if they cant pop it out of the knuckle? get a hammer and pound it up/out?
get a pickle fork and separate?

what happens if they cant get the jam nut loose? they gonna go buy torches?

i see what people are saying about how it is an easy/cheap fix cause it is.
but, if you know nothing about cars. have never fixed a car and have no tools you will not be able to do it.

all that being said, if that is the only real problems with the car....i mean the tires and the tie rods i would have it fixed..
go buy the tie rods yourself and after the tie rods are installed but before the alignment i would get the tires. if trying to save money i would get used tires. you can get used tires around here all day for 25 bucks. thats installed and balanced.

if you are short on cash you can wait a few weeks for the alignment and tires. if the tires are already beat up it can wait. not having it aligned after tie rids will not make messed up tires any worse in a few weeks.

just my opinion.

scrap is down right now so if you take it to a scrap yard you might get 225 bucks for it.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 06:20 AM
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a reply to: Galadriel

i would like to know where the 1500 estimate is coming from.

thats a steep estimate but thats how dealers can be.

i have to put a fuel pump in my wifes car in the next couple days. soon as the rain stops.
the entire assembly cot me 83 bucks. hopefully i can have in removed and reinstalled in2.5 hours.
i know i will run into problems. most of my tools are at work and i am doing this on the ground. sometimes a line will break here and there. nothing too bad.
my point is if i took it to the ford dealer i would be paying 900-1200 bucks for this repair.

shop that estimate around. i know how dealers can be.

i work at a dealer and i see it every day



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 06:24 AM
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a reply to: Galadriel




I have no experience with this kind of thing. Neither does my son really.



I'm pretty good at fixing my own vehicles, but sometimes I get stuck on something I haven't done before, or haven't done in a while, so I go straight to Youtube. There are some amazingly good videos out there, that show you step by step how to do it. Tie rod ends are very easy, if you take your time and follow the steps that are crucial, like counting threads. The gear heads will know what I'm talking about. You'd be surprised how easy it really is to fix the little stuff, once you get in to it. If it's too much of a financial burden to buy a new one or pay to fix it, try being a "shade tree mechanic" it just might pay off.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 06:43 AM
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for the record i am a firm believer that everyone should have a couple hundred bucks worth of the basic tools and should try and learn about this stuff.

another thing OP.
just cause you need 1 or all tie rods does not mean you have to stop driving the car. a bad tie rod will chop tires up but if the tires are already bad then drive it.

now be aware that at some point you will be turning a corner or into a parking lot and one of the tie rods will finally break and you tire will then be laying flat in the road.
could happen on your first trip and it could be 6 months down the road.
take it easy around your corners and you could squeeze a couple weeks out of it.

here is your outer tie rod and its not even 6 bucks
www.partsgeek.com... dge+Tie+Rod+End+03+04&utm_source=google&utm_medium=ff&utm_campaign=PartsGeek+Google+Base&gclid=CJe109_cpcYCFQiEaQodg5MDlQ

another listed here for about 15 bucks

www.oreillyauto.com...

you see the moog brand is about 40 bucks. moog is the best in front end parts so dont worry about that brand. get the cheap stuff as it is a beater.

here i a video of it being replaced on a sebring. your car will be the same.
you dont have to measure with the tape if you do this. just count your rotations. if you have to turn is 13 full turns to get it off then turn the new one 13 times when putting it on.




posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:03 AM
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a reply to: Mugly

It's a local garage - I take all my cars there after the 3 years with the dealer on any new cars is up. They are BBB, AAA approved, got a good rep locally, and he's truthful I think as he's told me in the past when it isn't worth fixing something.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:08 AM
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Found the list - right outer tie rod, front stabilizer links, left rear stabilizer broken, 2 rear tires, right rear radius arm bushing (spell?), plus it's oil change time.

With parts, labor for all but the right rear radius thing - it was $801 without tax. Then he estimated another $400 for the other thing. But that does't yet include tax - and the odd other thing that breaks as they are working on it.

Inevitably for me, the price always is higher than I had thought it would be.

Lots of great feedback and advice.

Thank you



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:12 AM
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originally posted by: Galadriel
a reply to: Mugly

It's a local garage - I take all my cars there after the 3 years with the dealer on any new cars is up. They are BBB, AAA approved, got a good rep locally, and he's truthful I think as he's told me in the past when it isn't worth fixing something.


fair enough.
your OP said the car needs 1500 bucks worth or repairs and new tires.

as a mechanic im telling you it does not add up so there is either more wrong with the car or he is trying to pull a major rip job.

even getting the best parts and paying the highest labor rates you should be way under 1500 bucks.

prob not even an hour labor for both sides. thats 80 bucks.
bother outers. lets call then 50 in parts. if it is inners lets be safe and call it 100 in parts.
the alignment should come in at about 80 bucks.
2 new tires we will call 100 each plus 15 to mount and balance.

so i am getting 230 for tires
150 in front end parts
80 for labor..

so i am sitting at $460 which is still very much high for this job.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:18 AM
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originally posted by: Galadriel
Found the list - right outer tie rod, front stabilizer links, left rear stabilizer broken, 2 rear tires, right rear radius arm bushing (spell?), plus it's oil change time.

With parts, labor for all but the right rear radius thing - it was $801 without tax. Then he estimated another $400 for the other thing. But that does't yet include tax - and the odd other thing that breaks as they are working on it.

Inevitably for me, the price always is higher than I had thought it would be.

Lots of great feedback and advice.

Thank you



if it were my car i would get the outer tie rod, the alignment, and i would get 2 new/used tires, mount them on the rear and rotate them to front.
the stabe links will not cause any tire wear or cause it to pull. you might here them rattle a bit when you go over certain bumps.
same deal for the radius arm bushing.

sounds like your mechanic is doing his due diligence and tell you all the stuff you 'need'. that is good...
there are different levels of 'need' though.

while i suppose technically you do need stabe links, you dont really need stabe links...
you know?

throw the tire rod and tires on, get a thrust angle alignment done and you will be fine. in and out of the shop in an hour and a half. couple hundred at most spent.
edit on 23-6-2015 by Mugly because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 07:47 AM
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a reply to: Galadriel

Maybe it's cost of living, but when we had ours done, we knew we were taking it somewhere that was gouging us and it still only cost between $500 and $600.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 08:06 AM
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originally posted by: Galadriel
Found the list - right outer tie rod, front stabilizer links, left rear stabilizer broken, 2 rear tires, right rear radius arm bushing (spell?), plus it's oil change time.

With parts, labor for all but the right rear radius thing - it was $801 without tax. Then he estimated another $400 for the other thing. But that does't yet include tax - and the odd other thing that breaks as they are working on it.

Inevitably for me, the price always is higher than I had thought it would be.

Lots of great feedback and advice.

Thank you



That's it!? You are not in that bad of shape here! Out of all that I would focus on the tie rod and the tires. You can ignore the stabilizer links and the broken stabilizer. I've driven cars with all the bushings pounded out and apart from a loose feel and some knocking, there's no real issue. You should be able to fix this for under $200 and be fine. It sounds to me like the mechanic you took it to was just calling everything he could in order to make the most he can. I'm not saying he's trying to steal from you, its just what mechanics do. If there's something they see that needs replacing, they call it, that's all.

Don't worry, it sounds like your car is in pretty good condition over all. Unless there is a lot of play in your steering wheel, or if the car is wandering around the road on it's own, I wouldn't even worry about the tie rod right now. Get a pair of used tires on the back and throw in an oil change, that should keep you going until your son can save up the $160 or so it will cost to do a tie rod and an alignment.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 08:11 AM
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originally posted by: Mugly
a reply to: PollyPeptide

a special tool for inner tie rods is not a must.
you can absolutely do it without a special tool.



In 30 years I've never seen an inner that didn't require an inner tie rod remover.... Either had to buy one, or make one.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 09:33 AM
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I`m with the crowd that would scream, GO FIX THE THING!!!!! But those points have been covered, since you do have good forum skills I would suggest visiting a Dodge or Stratus forum and talk with some of the members there for tips and advice. There are many awesome online communities that would be willing to lend a hand. That where I learned to maintain my old car and will get to watch it become a vintage or classic in a few short years.

You will need to invest in a SAE/Metric socket set and a screwdriver with a bit set, and some WD-40. You can get far with those basic tools, also a jack with jack stands. Also from the knowledge gained by doing some of these repairs brings the potential to make money by doing it for other people. I do mechanic work as a side job and charge about half for labor as most shops do and I feel like I make plenty. Best part is it can be extremely enjoyable at times and many days end in victory which you just don't get in many fields of work.


originally posted by: PollyPeptide

originally posted by: Mugly
a reply to: PollyPeptide

a special tool for inner tie rods is not a must.
you can absolutely do it without a special tool.



In 30 years I've never seen an inner that didn't require an inner tie rod remover.... Either had to buy one, or make one.


Not sure about the Straus but a few Dodge/Chryslers have to have the entire rack and pinion replaced to fix inner tie rods, I know the Charger does.


edit on 23-6-2015 by StratosFear because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: Galadriel

I would have to advise against having a kid make his own repairs on something like tie rod ends. If done improperly, it could make the car unsafe. If that bothers you.



posted on Jun, 23 2015 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: PollyPeptide

originally posted by: Mugly
a reply to: PollyPeptide

a special tool for inner tie rods is not a must.
you can absolutely do it without a special tool.



In 30 years I've never seen an inner that didn't require an inner tie rod remover.... Either had to buy one, or make one.


dont know what to tell you. maybe in 30 years you have not done a lot. i dont know.
i did one friday without the oh so special inner tie rod removal tool


this guy did one with a crescent wrench

thelincolnmarkviiclub.org...

edit on 23-6-2015 by Mugly because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 4 2016 @ 04:06 PM
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originally posted by: Galadriel
My son's old 2004 car broke down, again. This time it needs $... The engine runs fine for now. Inside is pretty nasty dirty from my messy son.
...Any helpful advice? ...


Hopefully his car has now been either repaired/replaced. But I do have a bit of "Helpful Advice":

I've always believed that everyone who is licensed to drive should learn to perform basic preventive maintenance on your vehicles:
- check oil and other "fluids" (radiator, brake, transmission,
- check tire pressure.
- vacuum and wipe interior surfaces.
- inspect belts/hoses.

And this simple habit could save you from ruining a tire: Always walk around your vehicle to check tires and make sure there are not any problems (such as someone side-swiping your car while it was parked).

If you do have any family member who can teach you, then I suggest you ask friends.

------------

Hmm, when he drives the vehicle, your son probably thinks of it as "his." But for repairs, it is somehow your responsibility? I can understand that many people have no idea whatsoever how to repair anything.

It is one thing not feeling the need to keep an older vehicle "showroom clean." However to describe the vehicle as "pretty nasty dirty" tells me that you have more problems than just a lack of money for repairs.

If he does not "care" about keeping his car presentable, because he is only driving a "beater", then think of this. Should he be pulled over by a police officer he is much more likely to face scrutiny if the car is a pigsty! Picture a police officer looking into the car with a flashlight at night. Would you rather have them thinking
(a) "What a mess! What's he trying to do, hide something? Huh what is that under that trash anyway?"
or
(b) "Nice guy, driving old car, just trying to make ends meet."

------------

Alright, this is a reminder for me to take my own advice and clean my car windows. My car may be a 22 years old, but it doesn't have to look gross.

--
M

edit on 8/4/2016 by CutNGlass because: fix typo



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