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Cosmic Dust and Ceres

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posted on May, 30 2015 @ 10:43 AM
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Hey guys, I have a quick question I could not find an answer to on google this morning.


By now, we have all seen the bright spots on Ceres in photos.

My question is whether its Ice, minerals, or an alien spotlight, how is it even visible? I thought (and this is where I may be ignorant) that all celestial objects were covered with a fine layer of dust.

Cosmic_dust_Facts




By one estimate, as much as 40,000 tons of cosmic dust reaches the Earth's surface every year.[2]



(wow pictures are not easy on ATS huh)

This is a famous photo of moon dust. It seems to have a thickish layer.

So how recent do you guys think this reflective material/object would have to be to even be visible? And is it even possible that the whole crater is full of this material/object and most of its just covered?


Thanks



edit on 30-5-2015 by Legman because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 30 2015 @ 10:54 AM
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a reply to: Legman

Assuming its the result of dust having been removed, those shiny bits could indicate landing sites!!!

Who landed on ceres?




posted on May, 30 2015 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: Legman
There are some processes that cause the "fresh" material to appear from beneath, such as impacts or tidal interaction. For example, the surface of Saturn's moon Enceladus is practically pure ice:



The bright material at Ceres may be outgassing a little bit, and thus carrying the dust particles away from the surface. Dust in space easily gets electrostatic charge, which makes it float high above the surface.

Kudos for the question, though, I think we'll hear some more expert answers than mine.
edit on 30-5-2015 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 12:06 PM
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a reply to: wildespace


Question: How often other than on earth have we witnessed out gassing on an object?


I'm pretty ignorant in general on astronomy.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: Legman
a reply to: wildespace


Question: How often other than on earth have we witnessed out gassing on an object?


I'm pretty ignorant in general on astronomy.



Comets do it all the time when they are around here.
As well as that, Mars, Io, Enceladus, Europa, Triton, Mercury, Venus and more have been observed. The Moon is also have been observed having clouds in some part...but maybe that was just aliens having a Barby.
edit on 30-5-2015 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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Snow and ice don't generally sparkle like the floor of that crater. Could there be a mountain of ice there, thrust up from the impact?

A giant mountain range of semi translucent ice with fortress like crags and spires, glistening in the sun…



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 01:18 PM
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originally posted by: Legman
By one estimate, as much as 40,000 tons of cosmic dust reaches the Earth's surface every year.[2]


That makes it 80 microgramms or about 100 dust particles per square meter, just to put it in perspective.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: intrptr

When you place something with a high albedo, such as ice or snow, on the surface of something with a low albedo, such as the surface of Ceres, it will shine a lot brighter in images.

The bright spots have an albedo of around 40%, placing them in the snow/ice area. The albedo of the surface of Ceres is less than 10%. Lots of contrast.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 01:28 PM
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a reply to: cmdrkeenkid


The bright spots have an albedo of around 40%, placing them in the snow/ice area. The albedo of the surface of Ceres is less than 10%. Lots of contrast.

And gain on the lo light camera…

just wanted to play Disney.
edit on 30-5-2015 by intrptr because: added


ETA: Other stuff glitters, too.


edit on 30-5-2015 by intrptr because: additional



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 06:43 PM
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Thanks fellas... I starred all of you. Like I said I am ignorant in this field.


The purpose of the thread is that I am a stats guy. I wondered about the number of investigative craft we have like 17. and the percent chance that something new would happen on ceres that we would be able to see as a reflective source.

It seemed like hitting the lottery to me. I don't really believe in the lottery is why I posted this. I don't believe in aliens either... it is just a intelligible itch I had.


It just seemed to me... the few probes w sent out would actually hit on a "new" (I'm not sure thus this question to you space guys) uncovered "Ice" spot on a little non active ball of dust.... I in no way believe in aliens (that are anyway near).


But Ill admit the probabilities in this seem extreme. Please educate me.




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