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A view of the mind in five parts

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posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 05:05 PM
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I am interested in discussing this Hindu model of mind.

·jagrat chitta (conscious mind; "wakeful consciousness"). The ordinary, waking, thinking state of mind in which the majority of people function most of the day.

·samskara chitta (subconscious mind; "impression mind"). The part of mind "beneath" the conscious mind, the storehouse or recorder of all experience (whether remembered consciously or not) - the holder of past impressions, reactions and desires. Also, the seat of involuntary physiological processes.

·vasana chitta (subsubconscious mind; "mind of subliminal traits"). The area of the subconscious mind formed when two thoughts or experiences of the same rate of intensity are sent into the subconscious at different times and, intermingling, give rise to a new and totally different rate of vibration. This subconscious formation later causes the external mind to react to situations according to these accumulated vibrations, be they positive, negative or mixed.

·karana chitta (superconscious mind). The mind of light, the all-knowing intelligence of the soul. The psychological term is turiya, "the fourth," meaning the condition beyond the states of jagrat (wakefulness) , svapna (dream), and sushupti (deep sleep). At its deepest level, the superconscious is parashakti, or satchidananda, the Divine Mind of God Siva. In Sanskrit, there are numerous terms for the various levels and states of superconsciousness. Specific superconscious states such as: vishvachaitanya ("universal consciousness"), advaita chaitanya ("nondual consciousness"), adhyatma chetana ("spiritual consciousness").

·anukarana chitta (subsuperconscious mind). The superconscious mind working through the conscious and subconscious states, which brings forth intuition, clarity and insight.

Source: veda.wikidot.com...

The first three are common to all, the last two are less common. I'm interested in hearing from people who have experienced all 5, as I have.

👣




posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 05:18 PM
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I'm interested in hearing from people who have experienced all 5, as I have.


Now that would be telling.


edit on 10-4-2015 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 05:22 PM
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a reply to: Wifibrains

do you see room for improvement in the model, and do you see cross-cultural correspondences.

👣



posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 05:38 PM
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a reply to: BlueMule

Does it need improvement?

There are plenty cross correspondences though.

Are the "parts" in anyway related to the elements in Hindu tradition as in Buddhism?

Elemental ladder?




posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 05:47 PM
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a reply to: BlueMule

Sounds and looks awfully similar to idea or effects of brain waves...which is usually five.



I don't have too much experience in the Hindu regiment.



posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 05:59 PM
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a reply to: Specimen

Hmm. Fascinating.


Something remarkable happened when the monks in the study were asked to focus on feelings of compassion: their brain almost immediately went into the gamma frequency in a very rhythmic and coherent pattern. Food for thought… perhaps compassion meditation makes one’s brain “fire” at the rhythm of universal consciousness?


www.omharmonics.com...

👣


edit on 999FridayuAmerica/ChicagoApruFridayAmerica/Chicago by BlueMule because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 06:25 PM
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a reply to: BlueMule

I think a very important thing to remember when seeking this path is staying grounded.

It's very difficult for a lot of folks of any denomination to remember this key to the corner stone of all religions, it does no good to lose ones head about truth.

Other than that I'm happy to say I have followed all three in their times respectively.

Non duality is a big part of my belief system.

Understanding some of the base mechanics behind nature was and is one of the benefits enjoyed.

It's really a different frame of mind though like any other.

What frame of mind works best for your whole?

These paths all lead to one desirable thing, continued betterment...self improvement on a regular and continuous cycle.

Changing ones frame of mind is not for the faint of heart, it's a journey like any other.

Some of us like the journey a little extreme I guess lol.


Cheers!



posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 06:28 PM
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a reply to: BlueMule

I know eh? They seem to somewhat correspond with the five models of a Hindu frame of mind.

Funny how you brought up "Gamma waves", where I believe may have reached a gamma like state unintentionally several years back. It was around the time when I was getting into binural beats after many months of meditating, an listening to Reiki music I found off Youtube. I do think the binural was titled "Gamma" had a large effect on me for some reason at the time, where I felt like I entered a state of bliss, and the crown of my head felt like it was over flowing.

Like something had built up inside for long enough time, and I felt like a fountain of vitality.

It was an interesting experience for me, an I don't ever really remember being upset for any reason for those few days, because I felt so detached from everything. I felt like I came close to it again once or twice over the years, but yet, I felt like I was some what being blocked by myself...But hey, if I did it once before I can do it again, might be a while give or take. Also I never had the same reaction again from any binural so I stopped using them two years ago.

Wish I bought that EEG device online back then...
edit on 10-4-2015 by Specimen because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 09:48 PM
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a reply to: BlueMule




The first three are common to all, the last two are less common. I'm interested in hearing from people who have experienced all 5, as I have.



All five (according to Vedic dogma expressed in OP) are common to all...



I am interested in discussing this Hindu model of mind.


When one advances down any mystical school of thought, they soon discover that all models are identical.



I'm interested in hearing from people who have experienced all 5, as I have.



Children are the best at experiencing all five.



posted on Apr, 10 2015 @ 10:02 PM
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originally posted by: Involutionist

All five (according to Vedic dogma expressed in OP) are common to all...


Well, I would say all five are a part of all of us. But the actual experience of turiya is rare. I was 40 when I experienced it, and it was unlike anything I had experienced before. It was earth-shattering. Years later I think about it everyday.


When one advances down any mystical school of thought, they soon discover that all models are identical.


They have different emphasis, and appeal to different psychological types; temperaments.


Children are the best at experiencing all five.


And a little child shall lead them.

👣


edit on 171Friday000000America/ChicagoApr000000FridayAmerica/Chicago by BlueMule because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 12:20 AM
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·anukarana chitta (subsuperconscious mind). The superconscious mind working through the conscious and subconscious states, which brings forth intuition, clarity and insight.


Sometimes reading other religions gives more insight into ones own. The Jewish Book of Zohar for example lists five sefirots which I believe are also states of conciousness. It explains that even if we reach the final state of conciousness in this world there are a further 4 worlds each containing five sefirots.

Hinduism has 7 upper worlds and 7 lower (according to them we are on the lowest of the higher worlds) so superconscious in this world might only give us a step up to the next level of consciousness, not a superconscious that breaks through all levels of ignorance.

The difference in the number of worlds between religions might be explained by the levels of enlightenment the authors of religions achieved, there could be a vast number of worlds between us and the creator that all the authors couldn't see.

Me thinks we all have a long ways to go.



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 05:04 AM
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Here is an interesting analogy on what you are referring to:


Pure mind -- what it is A pure mind alone can have super-conscious experience or the experience of Samadhi. Ice, water, and water vapor are one and the same substance. Yet judging by the amount of freedom enjoyed by them water vapor is far superior to the other two. If I put a chunk of ice in this lecture hall it won't be able to move. It has very little freedom of movement. If I apply heat to this chunk of ice it will melt and become water. Then it can spread out and flow. Water undoubtedly has more freedom of locomotion than ice, Now let me heat up the water until all of it is transformed into water vapor. It can now spread out everywhere; it can even fill up this entire hall and reach all four walls, Water vapor has much more freedom of movement than ice or water, Not only has it great freedom of movement, but it also is invisible! So also is mind. Ordinary mind is like ice or water. Due to its limitations it cannot have super-conscious experience. On the other hand, the pure mind is like water vapor. It is free of limitations and is capable of having super-conscious experience, or Samadhi.


Hindu Philosophy Of The Mind And Consciousness

Don't think I have anything personal to add, except I think about the mind thought process all the time so your post is interesting to consider and contemplate. Thanks for sharing.

leolady



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 04:48 PM
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a reply to: BlueMule





Well, I would say all five are a part of all of us. But the actual experience of turiya is rare. I was 40 when I experienced it, and it was unlike anything I had experienced before. It was earth-shattering. Years later I think about it everyday.


Were you aware of the experience as it was happening or did you become reflective after in a filtered fragmented state?

The reason I ask is: To be conscious of Turiya (which is state described in Sufism, Gnosticism, Kabbalah, and all other mystical schools of thought...using different names) is not to experience it all.

Were you aware of this state as it was happening without any preconceived ideas or can you only now recognize it as such based on external research describing what to look for?

Again, to describe it is not to experience it all.

Just trying to feel my way though this thread, bear with me.

Bless



posted on Apr, 11 2015 @ 05:04 PM
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a reply to: Involutionist

Of course I'll bear with you, I appreciate any help I can get understanding mysticism.

I was very lucid during the experience. In the OP, it says there are various levels and states of superconsciousness. I don't know which level or state I was in. I was aware as it was happening. if I had preconceived ideas, they didn't prepare me for it. Afterwards I did a lot of research.

👣



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 12:59 PM
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a reply to: BlueMule




Of course I'll bear with you, I appreciate any help I can get understanding mysticism.



To be frank, I simply label it "life" instead of mysticism, spirituality, etc. In fact, gazing at a flower can offer the same insight one entertains during altered states of consciousness given many names to make the ordinary seem extraordinary. I actually don't believe in set dogma of any kind.

In your previous reply to me you stated:



Well, I would say all five are a part of all of us. But the actual experience of TURIYA is rare. I was 40 when I experienced it, and it was unlike anything I had experienced before. It was earth-shattering. Years later I think about it everyday.



How did you know to label the experience that...?

You also stated this:



I was very lucid during the experience. In the OP, it says there are various levels and states of superconsciousness. I don't know which level or state I was in. I was aware as it was happening.


So you are not sure if you experienced Turiya now?

What exactly can you share about your experience? Details count, especially concerning these topics.

Starred your last post.






edit on 12-4-2015 by Involutionist because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 01:25 PM
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originally posted by: BlueMule
a reply to: Involutionist

Of course I'll bear with you, I appreciate any help I can get understanding mysticism.

I was very lucid during the experience. In the OP, it says there are various levels and states of superconsciousness. I don't know which level or state I was in. I was aware as it was happening. if I had preconceived ideas, they didn't prepare me for it. Afterwards I did a lot of research.

👣

Sorry for Electronically eavesdropping out of the blue...

I've been guessing as to how you would like to delve deeper into consciousness by looking at your posts for your brain to digest the material as to put into words. I think this becomes a huge distraction from what I've read about Gopi Krishna and his pursuit of Yoga.

Where after his immense consciousness experience became incredibly distracted to his experience that he would spends days, or weeks on end trying to think about it. He got so attached to it, I believe he couldn't meditate for a long while, but I haven't and forgot to completely read all the way through it. I do remember that he was an avid yoga practitioner, and his consciousness experience did not happen till 17 years after practicing, and was said to be intelligent where he'd spend hour reading on the subject.

I personally believe such experiences only happen when the brain is en trained enough by methods like detachment, where it forgets that it is aware, and experiences it, without trying to define it. This is probably the most basic way to put the practice of detachment to good use. I've gotten pretty good at it, since I used to work in a chaotic environment where it great too practice entrophy of the mind, but I guess that in my youth would, to this day, like something more solid of a practice or material too bite my teeth into.

I'm just personally sick of it, even though such practice has been the greatest asset to me, I need something material or physical more or less. It like my personal experience with weight lifting for a long time, it just seems like an everyday chore.

Also, I have noticed a comparison that mysticism may heavily differ from practices of yoga, buddhism, to other religions. Most religion often try to separate themselves from mysticism for whatever reasons, where I don't think they are so much concerned or frightened with it(unless otherwise like the Abrahamic ones), but that it might go against the practices of enlightenment or detachment.

Since spirits and demons on the other side of this realm can be a distraction, and it impedes the goal in mind. Not to mention, all the religions have a beef with mysticism it seems.

Just a thought.

edit on 12-4-2015 by Specimen because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 01:46 PM
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originally posted by: Involutionist

How did you know to label the experience that...?


Subsequent research and conversations with people.


So you are not sure if you experienced Turiya now?


Not sure which level of turiya.


What exactly can you share about your experience? Details count, especially concerning these topics.


It was a lot like this. Floating in a cosmic womb. 🚼

There were lots of 'blue pearls' there. So beautiful and alive! Flashing at me in brilliant patterns.



👣


edit on 840SundayuAmerica/ChicagoApruSundayAmerica/Chicago by BlueMule because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 22 2015 @ 01:28 AM
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I could experience gamma waves at will on an Emotiv EEG and retain for over 5 minutes. Maybe you might like to talk on this. I do not have too much understanding of the implications of this result. My email is mayankgandhi04@gmail.com




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