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Colorado bill would impose $15,000 fine on cops who try to stop people from filming them.

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posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 05:40 AM
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Well that's interesting. A little protection for the average citizen who wants to collect their own evidence during police encounters. I see nothing wrong with this.

The Denver Channel


A package of police oversight bills introduced in the Colorado Legislature includes a measure that would impose up to $15,000 in civil penalties if a law enforcement officer seizes or destroys a citizen’s recording or interferes with someone trying to film them.

"Primarily, it came up as a result of the number of news reports we’ve been seeing about police officers telling people, ‘Give me your camera,’ or taking the data away, and that is unacceptable conduct," said Rep. Joe Salazar, a Democrat from Thornton and co-sponsor of the bill.

Salazar said House Bill 15-1290 has support from both Democrats and Republicans, and is not intended to penalize police.

"It takes a very special person to be a police officer," Salazar said. "We want to honor them, but at the same time, we have a few bad apples who need to be aware that their conduct now has major, major consequences."




posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 05:58 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

It still doesn't solve the problem.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 05:59 AM
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originally posted by: musicismagic
a reply to: tothetenthpower

It still doesn't solve the problem.



Nah you're right, it doesn't solve the overall problem. But at the very least it will make officers think twice about trying to grab my camera phone or whatever out of my hands and smash it into a million pieces because they are afraid of getting caught.

~Tenth



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 06:06 AM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower

originally posted by: musicismagic
a reply to: tothetenthpower

It still doesn't solve the problem.



Nah you're right, it doesn't solve the overall problem. But at the very least it will make officers think twice about trying to grab my camera phone or whatever out of my hands and smash it into a million pieces because they are afraid of getting caught.

~Tenth


Now, if only we had a few more laws like this.

BTW "it takes a very special person to be a cop".... Ya it takes a bully it seems, or someone willing to turn a blind eye to all the bs some of these cops are puing off.

A step in the right direction I'm my opinion.

We move slowly in the right direction.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 06:11 AM
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The fact that this bill is even thought of as needed just goes to show how bad it is now.

I say they should keep an eye on anyone who presses for the bill not to be passed.

They might as well add theft and destruction of property to the charges along with the fine. But I figure they didn't place it in cause it would reduce the chances of the bill passing.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 06:12 AM
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This is a big 'Wow' when legislators are starting to pay attention to what is going on, and I have to say it takes a bit of courage as well, the bad apples are every bit a bully as anything else and bullies are easily cowed when confronted. Let's hope this piece of legislation does get through, and it will also clear the air for honest police who will have the law on their side, when they see a rogue colleague acting out of order.


Just one thing, is Joe Salazar a Rep. or a Dem.



" said Rep. Joe Salazar, a Democrat from Thornton and co-sponsor of the bill. "
edit on 31-3-2015 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 06:13 AM
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a reply to: johnwick


BTW "it takes a very special person to be a cop".... Ya it takes a bully it seems, or someone willing to turn a blind eye to all the bs some of these cops are puing off.


There are over 800 thousand law enforcement officials in the USA. I would venture a guess that probably way less than 1/4 of those police officers have issues that these laws are intended to protect the public from.

So, although I dislike the police state and do worry about police militirization, the fact remains that the vast majority of police are doing a good job.

Murder and crime rates have been on a steady decline for 30 years now. In part because of the good work police have done.

Let's remember there's a huge difference between our judicial system, the laws it creates and the job of the people tasked with upholding those laws.

~Tenth
edit on 3/31/2015 by tothetenthpower because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 06:26 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

It's definitely a step forward. Of course it won't do much if there's only one person filming and police take their device. Then it would be the onlooker's word vs the word of the police, and I can't imagine the onlooker winning. The police might even shoot then say they thought it was a gun or something.

But at least it's a step forward.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 06:27 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

And this fine would be directly paid by the cop? Or the taxpayers would pay it and put the officer on paid leave, or meter maid duty? Would it apply to drones?

If it passes, I am making my short journey to CO to test it out. Supplies: one spy camera (button, pen, glasses frame, etc), storage for footage, one decoy old camera. Comply when asked to hand it over, he will take the tape out and likley give the camera back. Tell the cop thank you, and get name and badge, skip to attorney then dispensary.Boom 15,000G.

I could sit at home and follow a cop car with a drone/camera, hover 20 feet above a crime scene, not bothering anyone, ominously focusing a telescopic lense at them, lowering microphone by cable, just out of their reach, wait for them to shoot it, they will miss repeatedly and I will not only get 15k for them trying to destroy camera, but the enjoyment of seeing a cop fire on an inanimate object repeatedly for just being enraged by the eye in the sky. And this is how any civilians feel, thank you cop.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 06:30 AM
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Is there any kind of law that makes it so the officer has to film as well? I have found that in many cases, when it is time for court, the officers video has been misplaced. Maybe make it mandatory for the officer to video the encounter as well.

This almost wreaks of putting the onus on the civilian to prove what the officer is saying is wrong if that is the case. Causes the civilian to have to prove innocence...and it's hard to film if handcuffed, which would be an easy way for an officer to keep them from filming.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 06:38 AM
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a reply to: iDope

I would imagine, and correct me if I'm wrong but most Leo's are bonded employees?

So I would imagine it would come out of their bond?

~Tenth



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 07:11 AM
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a reply to: musicismagic

Nothing will ever fully solve the problem--can't you just appreciate that this is a step in the proper direction?



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 07:14 AM
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a reply to: Vasa Croe

No it doesn't, it just makes it illegal for an LEO to take or damage your (or someone else's, which is usually the case) video footage.

Our legal system doesn't necessitate proof of innocence--that's an oft spoken, yet incorrect, cliche (at least where the letter of the law is concerned). Sure, there are a few instances where that seems to be happening, but that becomes a judge problem, not a legal-system norm.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 07:42 AM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
a reply to: johnwick


BTW "it takes a very special person to be a cop".... Ya it takes a bully it seems, or someone willing to turn a blind eye to all the bs some of these cops are puing off.


There are over 800 thousand law enforcement officials in the USA. I would venture a guess that probably way less than 1/4 of those police officers have issues that these laws are intended to protect the public from.

So, although I dislike the police state and do worry about police militirization, the fact remains that the vast majority of police are doing a good job.

Murder and crime rates have been on a steady decline for 30 years now. In part because of the good work police have done.

Let's remember there's a huge difference between our judicial system, the laws it creates and the job of the people tasked with upholding those laws.

~Tenth


Way more than 1/4 turn a blind eye to their corrupt power mad brothers in blue.

If not, we would see a lit more than a couple of cops a year being arrested and or charged.

Instead they break worse laws than the people they are beating half to death while handcuffed, and their buddies all agree in the reports it was justified etc..

Up to and including, them all getting together and writing reports in such a way as to minimize the chances of them being found of any wrong doing.

I know a lot of cops, even the good ones do this, it is common practice.

That should be criminal in and of itself.

If they did nothing wrong, why would they need to calaborate on the reports?

It is criminal conspiracy at least.


edit on 31-3-2015 by johnwick because: auto correct got me again



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 07:49 AM
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a reply to: johnwick


Way more than 1/4 turn a blind eye to their corrupt power mad brothers in blue.


Do you think beat cops are capable of taking on Internal Affairs, the police unions etc?


It is criminal conspiracy at least.


Involving 800 thousand law enforcement officers?

Don't you think it's more realistic that the power structure of police is the problem? Not the police themselves?

Hasn't anyone noticed that since police departments stopped hiring vets and starting hiring people from ivy league schools that police brutality complaints have increased? Have we not realized that we aren't training them to diffuse situations anymore?

Or they lack the skills necessary to deal with violent and otherwise difficult situations? It's not all the blame of the individual officers or their collective. It's the way we govern police, train police and recruit police that's the issue.

~Tenth



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:06 AM
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The police union is a scary beast. Even the police fear it. As much as it protects some of the it enslaves the rest.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:25 AM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
a reply to: johnwick


Way more than 1/4 turn a blind eye to their corrupt power mad brothers in blue.


Do you think beat cops are capable of taking on Internal Affairs, the police unions etc?


It is criminal conspiracy at least.


Involving 800 thousand law enforcement officers?

Don't you think it's more realistic that the power structure of police is the problem? Not the police themselves?

Hasn't anyone noticed that since police departments stopped hiring vets and starting hiring people from ivy league schools that police brutality complaints have increased? Have we not realized that we aren't training them to diffuse situations anymore?

Or they lack the skills necessary to deal with violent and otherwise difficult situations? It's not all the blame of the individual officers or their collective. It's the way we govern police, train police and recruit police that's the issue.

~Tenth


Very good point.

Vets are taught in the military to "maintain their military bearing at all times".

I don't see this from beat cops.

I gave had several very vocal exchanges with police, even a county sherrif and a police chief at one point.

Because their officers jump to threatening arrest if I tried to call my lawyer, which is my absolute right at first contact with police.

I have never been arrested or charged with any crime.

So why do they come at me all crazy like I am a felon wanted for murder?

I do believe it is training.

But also it is who they recruit.

They intentionally recruit lower IQ individuals.

"Because smarter people will get bored and leave the force"

Which is a huge problem.

Another is the rampant steroid use.

It is called roid rage for a reason.

I think the entire culture is just bad.

Which is why private security forces are taking over.

In the towns that have fired their cops and brought in private contractors complaints fall by factors as well as arrests and physical confrontations.

Seems obvious to me the problem is just their entire culture.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:29 AM
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a reply to: johnwick


They intentionally recruit lower IQ individuals.


You'd think that's the case, but a lot of precincts are hiring out of universities these days. The people they hire have, in most cases, no real world experience dealing with felons or extremely physical activity as part of the everyday job.

This makes them more afraid and by being afraid, are more likely to use lethal force or force in general to resolve situations, because they lack the skills otherwise.

I agree, LEO culture needs to change, but that's mostly at the top and with the unions. I've been very anti cop in the past and only from having talked one LEO in particular, a man I respect a lot more than you average person, Semperfortis, I've changed a lot of my outlook because I can see the problem from a different perspective.

Trust me, most cops aren't happy about the militarization without training or the 'guppies' who fill the ranks every year who have no real idea what law enforcement is.

~Tenth



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:50 AM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower

originally posted by: musicismagic
a reply to: tothetenthpower

It still doesn't solve the problem.



Nah you're right, it doesn't solve the overall problem. But at the very least it will make officers think twice about trying to grab my camera phone or whatever out of my hands and smash it into a million pieces because they are afraid of getting caught.

~Tenth


As long as the fine comes out of the officer's pay and not from the taxpayer, it makes sense.



posted on Mar, 31 2015 @ 08:54 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

Hear hear! Fantastic idea. Penalties for overstepping authority. This may be the only solution to these types of issues. And best of all, the evidence will be on video. No "he said she said" bs.



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