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Fun in the desert again

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posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I think that a saw that crash video on the Discovery Channel several years ago.




posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 01:47 PM
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Hey Zaph (or anyone who can answer). This is a little off topic, but the pics of the SR-71's reminded me and I don't want to bump a month dead thread in the aliens forum or start a new topic just to ask.

Did the SR-71 actually have a piece of technology that Ben Rich may have affectionately referred to as the 'missile sucker,' which, as far as I can tell, would have been technology from Project Palladium/Whatever-that-program-was-actually-called?

I can't find heads or tails of it outside of the book I'm reading and a book that (I assume) references the book I'm reading.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
Same videos, but the second one has a bit of a nice lead up. (I think. No sound right now.)





Edit to add:
a reply to: framedragged

I think the usual way for the SR-71 to evade a missile was to throttle up. The high altitude and the speed would let them outrun most anything.
edit on 3/26/2015 by cmdrkeenkid because: Added additional response.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 03:18 PM
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a reply to: framedragged

I can't say that I've ever heard that term before but I can see the SR-71 pilots using something like that as a term of endearment to describe the effect an SR-71 had as it flew over enemy territory.
It sucked all the enemies SAM's off their launchers at it. Fortunately never to hit their marks.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

One did. At least some of one did. Although technically it was an A-12 IIRC.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 03:45 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

The section definitely seemed to have some suspect flight ceiling numbers for the bird, so it wouldn't have suprised me if it was cause it sucked sams off their pads. The author also said it was an SR-71, but he called em all oxcarts at the end of the chapter so an A-12 sounds pretty reasonable too.

But point being, the book was released in '86, and the Palladium thread was in January.

Has it just...
flown under the radar?
edit on 26-3-2015 by framedragged because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 03:51 PM
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a reply to: framedragged

The A-12s were usually referred to as SR-71s to keep their cover.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 03:55 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Cool beans and great pics.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 05:30 PM
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I can't imagine ejecting from those altitudes and airspeeds. Ejecting over Edwards and landing in Area 51. Ouch!



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: buddah6

Bill Weaver and a civilian engineer were "ejected" at 78,000 feet and Mach 3.12 when their aircraft snapped in two behind the cockpit. The engineer was killed instantly, but Weaver survived with minor injuries.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 06:00 PM
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I'm on holiday in California in June/July,looks like a visit here would be worth the trip up from LA.I gather it is normally open to the public,but wasn't on the day you were there?

Also not far from Edwards AFB,is there anything publicly accessible there?
edit on 26-3-2015 by Imagewerx because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: Imagewerx

The Park is open weekends. Getting there on a weekend would take a miracle for me.

You can see some things on Edwards from the right spots.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 06:08 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

That is truly amazing! Weaver has to be made of iron.
edit on 26-3-2015 by buddah6 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 06:14 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Ok thanks,and unlike the UK,it's nice to see that admission is free!!!!!!!



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 06:36 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Zaph do you know if the rumor that one of those retired 787's in Palmdale is getting fitted for sale to Zero-G is accurate? I didn't think they resold retired aircraft like that.

Also general info for the thread; the sole surviving M-21 is on display at the MOF in Tukwilla, WA with a D-21 mounted. That place is a great tour for folks to take. Some fascinating craft there.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 06:46 PM
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a reply to: howmuch4another

I don't know about Zero G, but a number of the "Terrible Teens" have been sold for up to 50% off the list prices.

They weren't all retired, just stored because they didn't meet production specs, and would cost to much to get there.
edit on 3/26/2015 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 07:43 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Yeah I read that just last month. I know those were overweight for one. I am still trying to debunk the Zero-G thing. I got a free beer coming if I do even though the burden of proof should be on him. As strong as composites are I can't imagine them using that particular plane for that purpose. Especially a retired one.



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