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Homemade margarine

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posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 01:52 PM
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I chose this forum because I didn't really know where else to put this information. It could have been easily placed in the Survival forum. Many people don't have access to fresh milk or non-biotic products. The choices for ingredients are almost limitless and very easy to keep organic and vegan if desired.




What exactly IS margarine?

Margarine is a semi-solid butter substitute made from vegetable oil, which on the face of it seems healthier than butter. Commercial margarine is made from hydrogenated vegetable oil. "So what?" you may say.

Well, the process of making margarine and margarine spreads is actually a bit of a nasty process. Commercial operations often/can start with cheaper, poor quality oils (that’s capitalism for you...). That oil is then "hydrogenated" to become a solid at room temperature using a nickel catalyst.

Read about hydrogenation here: en.wikipedia.org...

Hydrogenation actually alters the fat contents. The process also destroys many of the other beneficial nutrients present in vegetable oils. Preservatives, colorants and stabilizers are added to the final product as well.

During hydrogenation, liquid fats (i.e., vegetable oils) are infused with hydrogen atoms to make them semi-solid at room temperature. Unfortunately, the process produces trans-fatty acids, often in large amounts. A 1994 Harvard University study concluded that a diet high in trans-fat doubles the chance for heart attack and decreases life expectancy.

*snip*

Making margarine requires no special equipment except for one basic tool that most kitchens already possess. You need an electric food processor to pull this off. No amount of hand whipping will do it.

I often make mayonnaise in a blender, but I really don’t think that it would work in this case. The margarine thickened up more than a blender could handle, I’m certain.

*snip*

Recipe: Homemade Olive Oil Margarine

1/2 cup skim milk powder
1/3 cup of water
1/4 (to 1/3) cup kéfir
1-1/2 cups of chilled extra virgin olive oil (or safflower oil, etc.)
1 tsp salt*
a pinch of turmeric or more or none (it’s up to you) Turmeric adds colour.

Two cautions: First, olive oil is green so your end result will be green tinged, but that’s OK. Secondly, pay close attention to how the oil is whipping in the food processor. You can over-whip it, and it may not take the full 1-1/2 cups to achieve your desired consistency.

Dom’s directions: Reconstitute the milk powder by adding it to the water + kefir,* blended at slow speed, then add the oil a little at a time. If the mixture is still too soft, add more milk powder a little at a time until the mixture thickens.

www.docaitta.com...


The basic margarine recipe is

1 c of any very cold oil(s) of your choice. (mix, match etc)
1 c of water
1 t lecithen (approx 5 capsules = 1t and helps with the viscosity, i.e. a more solid spreadable consistency.
small pinch of salt

Fats of your choice can be added, any herbs or flavorings etc. Amounts can be changed to make a margarine that doesn't leave you with really wet toast. No salt, more salt, whatever you want. It's no different really (with the exception of water) than a flavored dipping olive oil for french bread or toast.

Before I'm attacked for suggesting margarine as an alternative to butter, please hear me out. With the price of butter nearing $5.00/lb, I looked at alternatives. Some people just want to use margarine rather than butter for their own reasons be they medical or personal preference. I will not use margarine but my SO really dislikes butter and uses margarine for toast, pancakes, baked potatoes etc. All our baked goods are made with butter and I use butter. But as I stated, I have been considering alternatives. I have even softened butter and then mixed it with oil to make it go further and easier to spread and helps keep the cost down. But for those who can't afford butter and don't want to use store bought margarine, here are some home made margarine recipes. These are not my recipes but from the net, and I have not made any of them yet but I intend to. It is encouraged for margarine be kept in the refrigerator to avoid separation. The 1st recipe using raw eggs which I personally would never make but I included it because it is an option.



1. Melt 2 table spoons of coconut oil in a small metal bowl on top of a candle holder
2. In the meantime, fill a larger transparent bowl with ice cubes and some water
3. As soon as the coconut oil has melted, add 3 tablespoons of vegetable oil or oil of choice to the metal bowl and put the smaller bowl into the prepared ice water
4. Use a whisk to mix the oils together and keep mixing until you see the colour change
5. Add 2 teaspoons of milk and 2 teaspoons of egg yolk and take the bowl out of the ice water
6. Add drops of lemon juice, salt, pepper and herbs to taste

www.news24.com/.../Watch-how-easy-it-is-to-make-homemade




1 Cup Olive oil, sunflower oil or coconut oil
1 Cup Cold water
1 Teaspoon Liquid lecithin
7 Drops of yellow food coloring

(Please visit sites for step by step. Very easy, VERY fast)

snapguide.com...



This one is more complex but to each their own.


Whether you're worried about hydrogenated oils or non-vegan ingredients, store-bought margarine can be problematic. Instead, make a homemade margarine from solid fat, vegetable oil and a few other ingredients. Coconut oil is an ideal fat, because it regains solidity after it cools. Egg yolks and cow's milk may form part of your margarine, but a completely vegan margarine can be made by using mustard and lemon juice as the emulsifying agent, and water or coconut milk as the additional liquid. Make the margarine special by adding chopped herbs and spices for flavor and color.

Things You'll Need:

Double boiler OR saucepan and heat-proof bowl
Mustard and lemon OR eggs
Solid coconut oil
Liquid oil (coconut, sunflower or vegetable)
Additional liquid (milk, water or coconut milk)
Optional flavoring ingredients (e.g. salt and pepper, chopped herbs, lemon zest)
Optional coloring ingredients (e.g. turmeric)
Large mixing bowl
Ice cubes
Wooden spoon
Cooking thermometer
Large spoon
Plastic or glass container with lid

Read more : www.ehow.com...




posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 02:02 PM
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The original margarine was made chiefly from beef fat.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 02:24 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

I haven't finished searching about margarine but I suspected that a lard fat could be used. I am considering using pork fat since I don't have lard and just for the flavoring. I'm going to have a little fun with this.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 02:57 PM
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Great info. Gonna try it.

But my love of saving bacon drippings in a coffee can and using it for a toast spread or frying chicken will live on tho.


Peace



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 03:13 PM
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I use my bacon fat for everything. People save it for me in mason jars so I can make biscuits for them, etc.

a reply to: jude11



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 03:54 PM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
I use my bacon fat for everything. People save it for me in mason jars so I can make biscuits for them, etc.

a reply to: jude11



The true liquid gold.


Peace



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 04:35 PM
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originally posted by: jude11
Great info. Gonna try it.

But my love of saving bacon drippings in a coffee can and using it for a toast spread or frying chicken will live on tho.


Peace


Agree there. My bacon fat is highly valued but I'm thinking a little will go a long way for flavoring. I purchased a metal bacon grease holder several years ago similar to this and it's great. There are many that have finer sieves but this one works for me and was cheap.




posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 07:15 PM
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a reply to: jude11

My lawd, do we ever use the bacon fat.

The wife once dumped some maple bacon grease into it. As long as she doesn't ever do that again, I won't have to shave her eyebrows in her sleep.



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 07:28 PM
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originally posted by: StoutBroux

originally posted by: jude11
Great info. Gonna try it.

But my love of saving bacon drippings in a coffee can and using it for a toast spread or frying chicken will live on tho.


Peace


Agree there. My bacon fat is highly valued but I'm thinking a little will go a long way for flavoring. I purchased a metal bacon grease holder several years ago similar to this and it's great. There are many that have finer sieves but this one works for me and was cheap.



That means no chunks? But those chunks are a surprise! Kinda like fruit at the bottom of the yogurt...


Peace



posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 07:30 PM
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originally posted by: bigfatfurrytexan
a reply to: jude11

My lawd, do we ever use the bacon fat.

The wife once dumped some maple bacon grease into it. As long as she doesn't ever do that again, I won't have to shave her eyebrows in her sleep.


Divorce right there.




posted on Feb, 16 2015 @ 08:39 PM
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a reply to: bigfatfurrytexan

Maple bacon isn't allowed in my house, lol, that is some nasty stuff.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux

When I first saw the title I was extremely skeptical.....but


FWIW, I have started to use coconut oil more and more for frying .....I found that adding some salt to the pan overcomes the sweet flavor, much as a good unsalted butter is sweet.



posted on Feb, 17 2015 @ 09:42 PM
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I stay away from margarine (along with any kind of veggie oil and shortning).

I use real butter instead (in moderation of course), olive oil and if I have something that calls for shortning, I use lard instead.



posted on Apr, 27 2016 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: butcherguy
The original margarine was made chiefly from beef fat.


I have been making my own margarine now but with a twist. This satisfies my butter desire and the margarine eater in my house. It is NOT vegan.

1 c sunflower oil
1 c melted coconut oil
1/3 c water (a little less than, amt is optional, some recipes call for more)
small pinch of popcorn salt like 1/8th teaspoon
salt
1 stick of very VERY softened butter but not melted to liquid but you could. It changes the flavor though.

I place the salts and water in a sterilized taller jar, swish until salts are dissolved well. Add oils. Place immersion blender at the bottom, holding it pressed against the bottom for 15 seconds and then slowly pulling up, like mayo, and then proceed to mix around with the immersion blender. Takes about 2 minutes in all. Set in fridge for a few hours. To use, don't dip in butter knife to scoop out, instead, scrape along the top and use as desired.

It turns out great, I don't refrigerate it after the original fridge setting, it's been cool out. Cheaper than butter if using beef lard saved from cooking, my toast isn't 'wet'. I just made a large reserve of filtered beef tallow and I'm going to use it instead of coconut oil because coconut oil is so expensive. I totally omitted the lecithin, not needed. But if you do choose to use it, the granules DON'T work, you really need liquid lecithin. Since there is salt in my beef lard (from cooking the beef) the next time I make margarine, I will refrain from adding salts until after I taste it.

There are so many options of ingredients to use. Basics:

1. liquid edible oil of choice
2. a 'hard' edible oil/lard
3. a bit of water
4. herbs and seasonings of choice.



posted on Apr, 27 2016 @ 01:05 PM
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a reply to: StoutBroux
I bet it tastes a lot like butter, with the stick of butter and popcorn salt.
My mother used rendered beef tallow to deep fry her french fries when I was a kid. They tasted fine, but if you were drinking something cold with your meal, the tallow would harden on the roof of your mouth... not a pleasant thing.



posted on Apr, 27 2016 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: butcherguy

LOL, yeah, cold crusty lard....no siree! I remember when I was a kid, a friend used melted beef lard to make a salad dressing. Let's just say besides being un-pourable after it cooled, it was pretty nasty looking. Didn't EVEN try to taste it.

I realize it sounds weird to use one butter in a margarine recipe, I could use less and it would still work, but I want that flavor. I love butter but it's just gotten too expensive to use on a regular basis. For me, I'm not veganything but I do try to save money when I can.

I don't always have margarine on hand but I do have cooking oils and some sort of a hard fat. So I'm also not bound as tightly to the supermarket.







 
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