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Snowden: iPhones Have Secret Spyware That Lets Govt's Monitor Unsuspecting Users

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posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 01:23 PM
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The NSA whistleblower doesn’t use a phone because of the secret software, which Snowden’s lawyer says can be remotely activated to watch the user.

Source: www.alternet.org...



"Edward never uses an iPhone, he’s got a simple phone," Anatoly Kucherena told Russian news agency RIA Novosti. "The iPhone has special software that can activate itself without the owner having to press a button and gather information about him, that’s why on security grounds he refused to have this phone."


As a reddit user mentioned, this could be playing a big role in so called "Parallel Construction" where authorities rebuild the trail with fake evidence to cover up the means they got their information.



This also plays into Parallel Construction, a term used to describe a process of building an incriminating case against a citizen without their knowledge, and then tipping local authorities off when and where they will be to do a routine traffic stop and find the incriminating evidence that authorities already knew was there.
Follow me? Reuters did a nice job explaining it:
The undated documents show that federal agents are trained to "recreate" the investigative trail to effectively cover up where the information originated, a practice that some experts say violates a defendant's Constitutional right to a fair trial. If defendants don't know how an investigation began, they cannot know to ask to review potential sources of exculpatory evidence - information that could reveal entrapment, mistakes or biased witnesses.
This is blatantly against the fourth amendment, of course, but the US Government has bypassed this issue by utilizing the FISA (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act) court's warrant rubber-stamping process (here's list of the warrant requests presented, approved, modified, or rejected). Of note, 0.3% of requests are denied.
Also, the vast majority of these warrants have nothing to do with terrorism, as you may think. The court even reinterpreted the legal doctrine used to compel railway workers to get drug tested (a minimal intrusion in privacy) to allow for almost limitless electronic surveillance on Americans. I # you not.
In one of the court’s most important decisions, the judges have expanded the use in terrorism cases of a legal principle known as the “special needs” doctrine and carved out an exception to the Fourth Amendment’s requirement of a warrant for searches and seizures, the officials said.
How patriotic! Continuing:
The special needs doctrine was originally established in 1989 by the Supreme Court in a ruling allowing the drug testing of railway workers, finding that a minimal intrusion on privacy was justified by the government’s need to combat an overriding public danger. Applying that concept more broadly, the FISA judges have ruled that the N.S.A.’s collection and examination of Americans’ communications data to track possible terrorists does not run afoul of the Fourth Amendment, the officials said.
So, that overwhelming public danger (drugged out railway workers laying railroads) was legally bound to terrorism in the schema of minimally invasive privacy intrusions. Your tax dollars hard at work, people.
Also, the President's legal framework adjustments entitled Updated Administration Proposal: Law Enforcement Provisions reorganize cyber crimes under the RICO (Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organizations) statutes, which gives the administration broader powers for prosecution. He alluded to this during the SOTU.
It also specifies under Section 103 (Modernizing The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act) that intentionally accessing or exceeding authorizations on protected computers without causing >$5,000 worth of damage is lawful (or at least specify no penalties), which to me seems a lot like what the NSA has been doing.


Personally, I ditched my smartphone last year and I've been the happy owner of a super thin Motorola Razr flip phone. Who owns iPhones?
edit on 24-1-2015 by MrMaybeNot because: added source




posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 01:28 PM
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I own an iPhone and it's a piece of junk. Even though I have the cameras covered up I'm sure they still listen/track 24/7. Sometimes convenience isn't worth it, if they do things like monitor you all the time. It's nothing new of course.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 01:34 PM
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ok...this info has been in patent statements of smartphone devices for quite sometime now. and let's not forget game consoles and smart TV's...geez, I have Comcast and they are continually trying to get us to sign up for "home security", where you have the ability to remotely check on the inside of your house by cameras....and, if you can do that, so can anyone else with half a brain in networking skills.....there are some companies that are pushing to have your own home constantly, and wirelessly monitored, and they get YOU TO PAY FOR THE SERVICE!!....the inside of my house is nobodies business, period.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 01:45 PM
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cordless land line home sets are vulnerable too. The mic on them can be activated, and the memory, (that very useful tool!!) can have data that's stored extracted.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 01:49 PM
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a reply to: MrMaybeNot

I bought a Chinese phone from Amazon or some such, it's doubtful the NSA have tampered with that.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 01:55 PM
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a reply to: MrMaybeNot

Not only does iPhone have back door, the newer the phone the better and more developed the backdoor.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 01:56 PM
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originally posted by: MrMaybeNot
The NSA whistleblower doesn’t use a phone because of the secret software, which Snowden’s lawyer says can be remotely activated to watch the user.

Source: www.alternet.org...



"Edward never uses an iPhone, he’s got a simple phone," Anatoly Kucherena told Russian news agency RIA Novosti. "The iPhone has special software that can activate itself without the owner having to press a button and gather information about him, that’s why on security grounds he refused to have this phone."


As a reddit user mentioned, this could be playing a big role in so called "Parallel Construction" where authorities rebuild the trail with fake evidence to cover up the means they got their information.



This also plays into Parallel Construction, a term used to describe a process of building an incriminating case against a citizen without their knowledge, and then tipping local authorities off when and where they will be to do a routine traffic stop and find the incriminating evidence that authorities already knew was there.
Follow me? Reuters did a nice job explaining it:
The undated documents show that federal agents are trained to "recreate" the investigative trail to effectively cover up where the information originated, a practice that some experts say violates a defendant's Constitutional right to a fair trial. If defendants don't know how an investigation began, they cannot know to ask to review potential sources of exculpatory evidence - information that could reveal entrapment, mistakes or biased witnesses.
This is blatantly against the fourth amendment, of course, but the US Government has bypassed this issue by utilizing the FISA (Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act) court's warrant rubber-stamping process (here's list of the warrant requests presented, approved, modified, or rejected). Of note, 0.3% of requests are denied.
Also, the vast majority of these warrants have nothing to do with terrorism, as you may think. The court even reinterpreted the legal doctrine used to compel railway workers to get drug tested (a minimal intrusion in privacy) to allow for almost limitless electronic surveillance on Americans. I # you not.
In one of the court’s most important decisions, the judges have expanded the use in terrorism cases of a legal principle known as the “special needs” doctrine and carved out an exception to the Fourth Amendment’s requirement of a warrant for searches and seizures, the officials said.
How patriotic! Continuing:
The special needs doctrine was originally established in 1989 by the Supreme Court in a ruling allowing the drug testing of railway workers, finding that a minimal intrusion on privacy was justified by the government’s need to combat an overriding public danger. Applying that concept more broadly, the FISA judges have ruled that the N.S.A.’s collection and examination of Americans’ communications data to track possible terrorists does not run afoul of the Fourth Amendment, the officials said.
So, that overwhelming public danger (drugged out railway workers laying railroads) was legally bound to terrorism in the schema of minimally invasive privacy intrusions. Your tax dollars hard at work, people.
Also, the President's legal framework adjustments entitled Updated Administration Proposal: Law Enforcement Provisions reorganize cyber crimes under the RICO (Racketeer Influenced Corrupt Organizations) statutes, which gives the administration broader powers for prosecution. He alluded to this during the SOTU.
It also specifies under Section 103 (Modernizing The Computer Fraud and Abuse Act) that intentionally accessing or exceeding authorizations on protected computers without causing >$5,000 worth of damage is lawful (or at least specify no penalties), which to me seems a lot like what the NSA has been doing.


Personally, I ditched my smartphone last year and I've been the happy owner of a super thin Motorola Razr flip phone. Who owns iPhones?


This is scary, and something I think about regarding my computer too. If all true, it shows our intelligence gathering agencies really are out of control and need to be put in check. I hope you are reading this CIA. Stop violating our Bill of Rights and privacy. This is America, not East Germany.

As to Iphones, I find them useful for the camera, email, googling things, and maybe maps in NY or subways/driving. But I don't use 90% of the other functions.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 01:57 PM
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originally posted by: TryAndStopTheFuture555
a reply to: MrMaybeNot

Not only does iPhone have back door, the newer the phone the better and more developed the backdoor.



Forgive me for my own ignorance, but is there solid evidence that the Gov has been using any or such backdoors?



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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originally posted by: Quetzalcoatl14
Forgive me for my own ignorance, but is there solid evidence that the Gov has been using any or such backdoors?


Oh my god, please send me your address so I can pay you subscription to a newspaper.

US has only been caught spying on German president cell phone and spying on population of planet Earth, geesh



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 02:25 PM
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a reply to: Quetzalcoatl14

There is no evidence, as this thread is pure fear-mongering. You could take my word for it, but who am I that my word could mean anything in these matters?

In fact, I am using iPhones since day 1, and there have been a lot of jailbreaks etc., which would have provided enough info to the independent (read: chinese or other asian countries) hackers to find those alleged backdoors...

Edit: Ok, the OP quoted something which ran across several larger websites 3-4 days ago, so I removed the part about the OP being an Fandroid and appologize for that.
Fact is anyway, that there was no backdoor found in several hard hacks into the iphones, I highly doubt that there is a real backdoor.
edit on 24 1 2015 by ManFromEurope because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 02:41 PM
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a reply to: MrMaybeNot

This isn't anything new and it's not just iphones. During cabinet meetings phones are taken off the person and locked in lead boxes. And to all the doubters yes it is perfectly possible even when the phone is switched off. The location is accessible, the camera and microphone are accessible and any data sent or recieved can be retrieved. Your privacy most likely isn't being invaded unless there is a good reason. The security and intelligence agencies are expensive enough as it is.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 02:45 PM
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There certainly is a documented use of FAKE CELL TOWERS.....so why not backdoors too?
I think the newer technology is built with this kind of snooping in mind.
Snowden is trying to stay in the limelight by telling us stuff that we already know....
What do you think that billion dollar building they built in Utah is for?
yep saving all that stolen information....it runs 24/7 and saves up the entire worlds conversations....



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 02:50 PM
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And I'm sure it's going to get even worse with the IBM-Apple alliance on the new iOS.

Fun times.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 03:03 PM
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originally posted by: TryAndStopTheFuture555

originally posted by: Quetzalcoatl14
Forgive me for my own ignorance, but is there solid evidence that the Gov has been using any or such backdoors?


Oh my god, please send me your address so I can pay you subscription to a newspaper.

US has only been caught spying on German president cell phone and spying on population of planet Earth, geesh


Dude, chill, slow your roll. I'm very aware of the US engaging in global and domestic surveillance. I'm speaking to smart phones specifically and these backdoors, rather than them monitoring actual communications going out and in. Those are not necessarily the same thing, although they can be at times.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 03:05 PM
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originally posted by: ~Lucidity
And I'm sure it's going to get even worse with the IBM-Apple alliance on the new iOS.

Fun times.
that's quite interesting by the way because someone who I worked with told me to be wary of large communications companies merging under the pretext of multi billion dollar/pound deals because it could be an effort to unify and control all the relevant sources of information and the benefits that come from owning these corporations under easier to manage and more powerful groups.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 03:22 PM
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That's the M7/M8 chips:

en.wikipedia.org...

Designed to operate independently of the rest of the phone even with the power off, these chips have their own battery and MEMS accelerometers, magnetometers and other sensors (MEMS = Micro Electro-Mechanical Sensors). It's like having a computer inside a computer.

gizmodo.com...



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 03:39 PM
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originally posted by: ManFromEurope
a reply to: Quetzalcoatl14

There is no evidence, as this thread is pure fear-mongering. You could take my word for it, but who am I that my word could mean anything in these matters?

What are you saying exactly?
Alexander has already admitted that a number of his staff used NSA spying tools just to spy on friends...Yuck! Lovers cells, e-mails and phone logs. The gear is there alright and includes land lines as well. And we are supposed to trust people like that?

To add, you see the OP..it's about Snowden, and what he doesn't use, or more to the point, what he does use! Funny that.
I'm not going to say that APPLE did the governments bidding, or that they didn't, all the Government sabre rattling, and tabloid and broadsheet panicking is most likely rubbish, a blind even, if cell-phones/mobiles /were are already vulnerable anyway. If all these phones, computers and comms have in-built diagnostics programs, and they probably do, then they are vulnerable to hacking. So thank you Gen. Alexander for your unwitting co-operation.



edit on 24-1-2015 by smurfy because: Text.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 04:19 PM
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originally posted by: Fermy
a reply to: MrMaybeNot

I bought a Chinese phone from Amazon or some such, it's doubtful the NSA have tampered with that.


The Chinese value privacy so much more



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 04:37 PM
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If their listening to me they must be really, really, really bored.



posted on Jan, 24 2015 @ 05:54 PM
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This really shouldn't surprise anyone. I mean, I have tools for iPhone and Android, that are freely available online, that can bind themselves to core system processes to remain undetected, and allow me to do the exact same things. If I can do it, surely the NSA can, and likely much more...




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