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High-profile doctor says ‘death from cancer is the best’ and that we should stop spending money

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posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 06:35 PM
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www.rawstory.com...

Another one of those "you just can't make this **** up" dept. threads.




Dr. Richard Smith, a former British Medical Journal editor and contributor to BBC television, believes that cancer is a blessing in disguise because it gives us time to tie up our affairs, not only financial and practical, but also in terms of mending broken relationships, saying goodbye to loved ones and revisiting our favorite music, poetry and locations one last time.


How about the pain and effect on family members Dr Smith?

I have watched family members die from cancer and despite the pain meds they died in agony; in fact they were praying for death to escape the pain. Dr Smith, you are a fool and don't deserve the status of Physician. You are an embarrassment to all real doctors.

Children also die from cancer; no consideration for them eh, you dip ****!
edit on 3-1-2015 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 07:08 PM
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I agree. This doctor will change his mind when they have to cut his as*888* out for prostate cancer. All sickness is a horrible thin and should be treated as such.
edit on 3-1-2015 by Kargun because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 07:08 PM
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a reply to: olaru12
The opportunity to put one's affairs in order exists all the time, so to spin it in this way is disingenuous. If we live within our means as opposed to building up debt --other than a mortgage, then our affairs are more manageable on a monthly basis. I know what hard times are, and when they happened, I sold some of my furniture to make ends meet.

To put a positive spin on cancer is just plain wrong. Perhaps such a diagnosis forces a person to reflect more on their life and sort out priorities from unnecessary trivia, but we all should be doing that at various stages of our human development in any case.



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 07:40 PM
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Wow, I bet if the shoe was on the other foot this guy wouldn't be saying cancer is the best anymore. This guy is a "high-profile" doctor? Lol, we're doomed.



posted on Jan, 3 2015 @ 10:28 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

More than likely we will be exposed to more of this kind of talk in the coming couple of decades. I won't be here that long, but many of you will enjoy a new climate settling on the "practice" of medicine as it contends with an ever growing problem to health and longevity. Cancers the world over are going to increase at even more drastic rates that what we enjoy so far over the decades. Those increases will be from the radiation that has been released from day one of the nuclear age, more precisely from the development of nuclear bombs experiments, nuke plant accidents and faulty storage of "spent" nuclear fuel.

The biggest uptick in cancers has already started in Japan from the horrendous Fukushima accidents and will spread across the Pacific Ocean to impact the western edge of North American and then spread across the entire northern hemisphere and finally drift down into the southern hemisphere.

Those of you still asleep and unaware of the seriousness of the Fukushima disaster upon the entire world need to start taking an interest in the situation and stop listening to the positive spiel of the people, agencies and governments that want for you to accept their soothing words about the ever-increasing dangers posed to the entire human race not to mention all other life forms in the Pacific ocean.

They talk and have talked for many decades now about finding cures for cancer. That magical mantra will never happen as radiation cancers and diseases spread at an alarming rate. How about we start talking about ways to PREVENT increases in cancer rather than treating once it appears? Abandoning all nuclear operations of scale such as weapons and nuke plants would be a wonderful plan for prevention.

In Japan they have new laws to protect from revelation the details of the extent of radiation poisoning affecting their citizens. Doctors and hospitals are muzzled, not allowed to officially report on the growing cases cancer cases apparently caused by radiation from the destroyed nuke plants. Don't think for a second that Japan's culture of people and government are unique in their way of not dealing with the problem head on. No government ever will. Nor have they openly done so in past accidents.



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 01:32 AM
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Getting cancer isn't a sin or a marker for bad genetics.

Environmental factors often have to do with cancer rates.

Doc in this thread sounds like a sleeper eugenicist. If he thinks suffering and dying is the greatest feat. He should lead by example.
edit on 2015 by BlubberyConspiracy because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 03:01 AM
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originally posted by: olaru12
www.rawstory.com...

Another one of those "you just can't make this **** up" dept. threads.




Dr. Richard Smith, a former British Medical Journal editor and contributor to BBC television, believes that cancer is a blessing in disguise because it gives us time to tie up our affairs, not only financial and practical, but also in terms of mending broken relationships, saying goodbye to loved ones and revisiting our favorite music, poetry and locations one last time.


How about the pain and effect on family members Dr Smith?

I have watched family members die from cancer and despite the pain meds they died in agony; in fact they were praying for death to escape the pain. Dr Smith, you are a fool and don't deserve the status of Physician. You are an embarrassment to all real doctors.

Children also die from cancer; no consideration for them eh, you dip ****!


Presumably he will inject himself with cancer when hes ready to die then a?



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 11:41 AM
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Context is everything. It's likely, as one who sees death every day, that he means one has time to wrap up things here, before dying, rather than, say, a car accident, heart attack or bullet... where it's just over with the living left suffering.

Personally, I've watched loved ones (and a couple just "liked" ones as well as one I didn't much care for, at all) die from cancer... and many other ways, unfortunately, and I'm left with the hope that my own end is fast... very, very fast OR somehow painless.

We, meaning the predominant culture in the West, should "grow up" and face death and dying and work to make it as painless as possible... even if that means administering a "hot shot" of sedatives to ease one into a literal big sleep... and thankfully, many nurses already do that, off the radar, in less enlightened places where that sort of end is "illegal."

Until medical science, metaphysics or some combo, develops immortality, death will be a reality for everyone... and it's obvious many of us don't think about it or have experienced it up close and personal, as our laws are ridiculous regarding mercy killing and our methods of dealing with the decline and end of life are miserable and humiliating.


edit on 1/4/2015 by Baddogma because: typo



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 11:53 AM
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This guy could put a book on Amazon and snag a years salary right now.

At least a PHD is still good for something.
rt.com...

www.ibtimes.co.uk...

www.nationalpost.com...
news.nationalpost.com/2015/01/02/cancer-the-best-way-to-die-says-ex-editor-of-british-medical-journal-so-stop-funding-research-for-a-cure

[
edit on 4-1-2015 by MALBOSIA because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 12:17 PM
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Two days before my mom died of pancreatic cancer she woke up for the last time.

Her last words to me were, "this is the worst death ever".

F@#! this doctor.



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 12:39 PM
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originally posted by: olaru12
www.rawstory.com...




Dr. Richard Smith, a former British Medical Journal editor and contributor to BBC television, believes that cancer is a blessing in disguise because it gives us time to tie up our affairs, not only financial and practical, but also in terms of mending broken relationships, saying goodbye to loved ones and revisiting our favorite music, poetry and locations one last time.



I have watched family members die from cancer and despite the pain meds they died in agony; in fact they were praying for death to escape the pain. ****!


Same experience sadly. We took care of mom at home until we couldn't control the pain. Hospice was involved the last few months after she stopped chemo. Hospice would not put her on IV meds at home, so the last 6 weeks she had to be at hospice house to try and control the pain.
Longest 6 weeks of my life and I wouldn't wish that on anybody. My wife and I took turns being there 24/7.
Just sitting there watching her suffer.
It was a daily routine of watching her moan in pain, and trying to get the nurse to get ahold of the doc to write new orders to increase the morphine. EVERY F^%$&@G DAY.
Finally when she woke up the last time and said "its the worst death ever" I snapped.
Put the doc against the wall and shortly after that he changed the meds and mom never woke up again.

F&@! this doc



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 02:33 PM
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This is exactly the same type of mentality that is shared by many at the top of the medical field. If it hasnt already been done yet in secrecy , we will travel to the end of space and beyond before cancer or any other money-making ailments ever get cured.

Many people still foolishly respect these clowns and view them as gods believing everything they tell us. Money is the main interest in the medical field, not our health.



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 10:19 PM
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This is the next step in Obamacare, XX% increase in premiums and when you need it they tell you tat "Cancer is good for you"



posted on Jan, 4 2015 @ 10:36 PM
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Quite honestly, this brings one thing to mind.


Why is it that our society is so damned hell bent over controlling how and when you'll die?

I've stated to loved ones on a myriad of occasions, that should any of a number of factors pop up in my health or cognitive abilities, that I am to be left alone. That a gun will be involved. And that they are to be planning for the inevitable.

The idea of living with a physically or mentally deteriorating condition, where there is no end foreseeable outcome other than death or medicines that are likely to cause even more pain and suffering in a prolonged fashion, is a repugnant one to me.

If I am told that I have been diagnosed with a cancer which is likely to be terminal, or a mental deterioration such as Altzheimers, or any other similar situation, I for one do not wish to live through such a scenario. I prefer to go out with a sense of dignity, and to allow my loved ones to get on with life as quickly as possible. Is it likely to prevent the pain they'll go through? No. Is it likely to cause less of a spiritual, emotional, economical, and physical drain on them in the long run? Quite possibly if not probably.


It is repulsive to me to think that any governing body or theological stance should dictate how and how long I live my life.

I care about my family and friends. I am not looking to impose a self timed death, or suicide as others would see it, in a cruel fashion upon them. However, it is something as my wish for my own life, that I know they would accept and abide with.



We are, after all, taught to rip the bandage off quickly, rather than prolong the suffering and remove it slowly.
I full well realize this will be considered a horrible response to the OP's story and statements. This is strictly my view. This is strictly the way I wish to live, and a means to limit the long term pain any single person (myself included) need suffer through.


-NF




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