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First scientific report shows police body-cameras can prevent unacceptable use-of-force

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posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:39 AM
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So this is the first actual study, having been done regarding wearable camera's with LEO's.

Source


Researchers from the University of Cambridge's Institute of Criminology (IoC) have now published the first full scientific study of the landmark crime experiment they conducted on policing with body-worn-cameras in Rialto, California in 2012 -- the results of which have been cited by police departments around the world as justification for rolling out this technology.

The experiment showed that evidence capture is just one output of body-worn video, and the technology is perhaps most effective at actually preventing escalation during police-public interactions: whether that's abusive behaviour towards police or unnecessary use-of-force by police.


Not only did it help reduce police use of force, but also the public was less likely to escalate altercations with police, when they knew somebody else might be watching.


During the 12-month Rialto experiment, use-of-force by officers wearing cameras fell by 59% and reports against officers dropped by 87% against the previous year's figures.


Can I get a big old ' we told you so'?

It seems, in California at least, it's been beneficial for both sides, at an increasing rate.

How many police officers have been wrongly pursued due to false complaints? How many citizens have not had justice served when it was simply their word against an officers?


With institutionalised body-worn-camera use, an officer is obliged to issue a warning from the start that an encounter is being filmed, impacting the psyche of all involved by conveying a straightforward, pragmatic message: we are all being watched, videotaped and expected to follow the rules," he said.


1 part technology, plus one part psychology, and everybody wins. I imagine we will see many more positive outcomes, in both RL scenarios and further study of this issue.

What say you ATS? Was POTUS, along with other law enforcement professionals, correct when they stated this should be widely implemented program?

I think so.

~Tenth




posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:50 AM
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I believe it would be a great benefit to the people if these cops had to wear body cameras. I truly believe it could be a great way to keep ones character in check during times of high stress and anxiety.

Now i will not be the first to say, they should be possibly hooked to a cell modem of sorts so all video is uploaded automatically and they should not have a switch nor a way to remove from the uniform.

I also believe all cameras should be monitored by a civvy organization. Police agencies shouldn't have a problem with the if they re all on the up and up, i mean they do protect the cops rights as well as the citizens.

I'm all for them Tenth.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:51 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

Great idea, if made a public record. Video footage and incriminating evidence does seem to have a tendency to 'go missing'.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 06:55 AM
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a reply to: shaneslaughta


I also believe all cameras should be monitored by a civvy organization. Police agencies shouldn't have a problem with the if they re all on the up and up, i mean they do protect the cops rights as well as the citizens.


That is the one thing I would like to see as well. A 3rd party who makes sure that the footage is well maintained and that it doesn't go missing in high profile instances.

It can be difficult to achieve though considering chain of custody issues.

~Tenth



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:08 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

The day's gonna come when all of us will be acclimatised to being recorded all day long.

As long as bad cops do bad things and bad people make false claims, these body cameras seem to be the best way forward. That huge decrease in complaints against police indicates how many false, litigious claims are made.

Sometimes it takes a neutral audience to make us see what we're doing wrong. It shouldn't require cameras to make people more honest and yet apparently it does. Sad world, eh?



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 07:11 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

That would be a no-brainer if there ever was one.

Look at the bright side, folks. Not only it will drastically reduce over-reacting by the LEOs, but the perps will (need to) think seriously about their own actions in such situations. The videos will more honestly show the situation. --Of course, the anger of perps in many of those situations will get beyond their best judgment which is the root of the problem in the first place.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:24 AM
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a reply to: SlowNail


Great idea, if made a public record. Video footage and incriminating evidence does seem to have a tendency to 'go missing'.

Like footage from cruiser, security cams and cell phones, the bad cops aren't stupid, they'll figure out how to beat the system. The good cops will wear them with pride.

If the monitoring isn't independent we can expect the same results regardless. Cams aren't enough . Independent review boards for police action and out of town prosecutors for Grand Juries should be added as well.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 08:40 AM
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I can't understand why they WOULDN'T want cameras everywhere unless they had something to hide. each patrol car has its own drone that follows it around videos 360 degrees. cameras inside the car and outside the car. on the officer. on his gun. pretty much everywhere and I don't want to hear any excuses like "but it's too expensive!". there needs to be an accurate, objective record of the incidents and we have the technology to do that.

a reply to: tothetenthpower



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 09:29 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower
On the one hand, I can applaud this as a step forward in reducing tensions between law enforcement and citizenry. A planned one using thesis, antithesis, synthesis, in my humble opinion. Be that as it may...

I can also see the misuse and abuse of this technology to the nth degree over time, by incrementally introducing further facets of Orwell's dystopian society. As Kandisky said...


The day's gonna come when all of us will be acclimatised to being recorded all day long.

This is how it starts. As a necessity, that we all applaud. Next, we will be requiring sex offenders to wear these at all times. Then, violent offenders once they are on parole. Then... you get the idea.

Am I saying we should not implement such technological measures? No. I'm saying, if we are not watchful, Orwell's 1984 becomes a reality in our lifetime. We were warned by our forefathers the times we now live in would come. Up to now, we haven't listened. If that trend continues, I would rather not be here to see the future of our species.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 09:40 AM
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It's a great idea but what's to stop them from "losing" or editing incriminating footage? It could happen.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 10:40 AM
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originally posted by: Skid Mark
It's a great idea but what's to stop them from "losing" or editing incriminating footage? It could happen.


That's where the 3rd party process should be implemented.

Make it local board, comprised of actual people, who meet once a month or something to review whatever issues have arisen.

Have it rotate every year or every 6 months. Hell you could tie it into local elections I suppose.

Tons of great ways to make this work if they put in the time.

~Tenth



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 11:13 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

This only works when the cops cant turn them off or can't "lose the footage". Already, people are seeing reports of police turning their cameras off. This shouldn't be an option.
edit on 28-12-2014 by th3dudeabides because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 11:16 AM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

I agree that a third party would work. Have them turn the footage in to the third party at the end of the shift or at least have a way that the third party has access to a live feed. That should inject some honesty into the process.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:26 PM
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It shouldn't require cameras to make people more honest and yet apparently it does. Sad world, eh?


This really is the sad truth.

We are talking the people we have entrusted to protect us and since bad apples want to betray that trust this type of move is necessary.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 12:52 PM
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a reply to: tothetenthpower

I'm all for it. It has to make a police officer think twice before using lethal force or beating an unarmed civilian. It will help both ways. I think it should be widely used to not only protect civilians from abuse, but also justify any lethal force used by a police officer. Dashboard cams can only record a small angle of view and can miss a close interaction or voice exchange with a police officer.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 01:18 PM
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originally posted by: Kandinsky
a reply to: tothetenthpower


As long as bad cops do bad things and bad people make false claims, these body cameras seem to be the best way forward. That huge decrease in complaints against police indicates how many false, litigious claims are made.



No it doesn't indicate how many false litigious claims are made against the police. It means there were no valid claims to be made because the cops know they are being watched so they're dotting their i's and crossing their t's and aren't beating the chit out of many innocent citizens. Way to spin it though.



posted on Dec, 28 2014 @ 10:14 PM
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Leave it to the scientific researchers to point out the obvious. I wonder, who funded the study?




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