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Would you be ressurrected by technology in the future?

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posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 03:52 PM
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THis is a subject that intrigues me in my daily life as I think about it. Ressurrection. Through science and technology.



1996 - The first animal is successfully cloned.

2003 - The full human genome is successfully sequenced.

2015? - The first fully immersible virtual world is developed.

2017? - The first human brain interface is integrated.

2030 - Humans develop virtual worlds to exist in.

3035 - Virtual worlds can exactly mimic reality in the past.

3040 - The first human clone is born.

3042 - A human is developed to live in a virtual world consisting of their former clone being's world.

3045 - You wake up 40 years old, 950 years from now, in a tube, exactly in the state as when you died, ressurrected.

So is it possible?


Even if it were possible to ressurrect a person would you opt in, or do you choose a quiet eternity?




posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 04:04 PM
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a reply to: ChefSlug

You might not be far off but it might happen sooner then later.
I found this disturbing.

Fixed link






edit on 17-11-2014 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)

edit on 17-11-2014 by DrumsRfun because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: ChefSlug

Thats TWO questions:

1. "So is it possible?" I'd think we'd first have to know and understand the whys and wherefores of it being finally POSSIBLE, why it became that way, and what the reasoning behind making it so is. There would be many for and even more against it in the beginning until it was clearly understood, and to what benefit the world should consider it.

2. "...if it were possible .....would you opt in, or...choose a quiet eternity? Again. See answer # 1.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 04:06 PM
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a reply to: ChefSlug

PS And I dont think I'd want my future great-great-great-great-grandchildren buggin me for $$$ 100 years on.....



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 04:06 PM
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a reply to: ChefSlug

Speaking from a spiritual stand point, no. You won't be able to be resurrected unexpectedly without housing your consciousness somewhere. Speaking from my own perspective, you would probably already have reincarnated at that point.

We are on the cusp of discovering the true science behind our consciousness (spirit, soul, etc.) and, at that point, I am confident we will attain immortality if we want it. But I believe it would have to be planned ahead.

Also, your timeline is setting the bar super low. The leading futurists seem pretty sure we'll reach that point in a matter of decades, not centuries. It's gonna be wild very very soon. There's a chance that our generations are either going to be the last to die or the first to live forever (paraphrasing Kurzwiel there).



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:10 PM
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Star Trek TNG had an episode involving something like this.

An object was discovered drifting through space. Inside were a few humans from the late 21st or 22nd century. They were preserved right before death so they could be found by aliens or in the future to be resurrected and have their ailments restored.

One was a former stockbroker or lawyer, very demanding and he had trouble adjusting to the future where man isn't so focused on economic pursuits (says Picard, I'm sure he likes to polish his latinum)

Another was a former musician who damaged his body with drugs and alcohol. He enjoyed drinking and discussing life with Data.

Also, a woman who was upset her family wasn't around. Counselor Troi helped her track down a living relative on Earth.

In the end, the stockbroker's gut feeling that the Romulans were lying saved the day, so we learned that despite the seemingly brutal way of life that was the standard before Earth got back on its toes, the people were just as able to display humanity.

Back on topic but I wouldn't do it. Who knows if death is cutting off everything or a continuation? I really would like to be immortal or live for thousands of years but my gut feeling says nope.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:13 PM
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a reply to: ChefSlug

I know that "I" will not be ressurrected by any future technology because I'm not an elite, rich, meglomanic, self-important person who thinks the world deserves more of me.

Quiet eternity is fine in this book.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:14 PM
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a reply to: ChefSlug

Count me out. I had a #ty enough time the first time around, why would I want to do it again with no family or friends?

Not to mention the future is probably going to really suck and I don't want to see what becomes of canada and the US after the SJW and feminist agenda is through.

Boo hoo, I don't think women should have more power than men, waaah



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:19 PM
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originally posted by: thisguy27
a reply to: ChefSlug

Count me out. I had a #ty enough time the first time around, why would I want to do it again with no family or friends?

Not to mention the future is probably going to really suck and I don't want to see what becomes of canada and the US after the SJW and feminist agenda is through.

Boo hoo, I don't think women should have more power than men, waaah


Don't worry. We'll be able to enhance you so you don't mind being a good person so you can enjoy the future like the rest of us!

I'm sorry, I mean "THE FUUUUUUUUUTUUUUUURE..."



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:22 PM
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I think the first human clone will be born before the 3000s but that's just me.

And what thisguy27 said, the future seems like it will be a very dark place. Dystopian, as if it's not one already lol.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 05:36 PM
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a reply to: mysterioustranger

Possibly for colonizing suitable worlds? Hopefully our space program will be just as advanced and we may need more people to settle there.
Or.....
They'd be considered 2nd class citizens and made to go and take the risks the present population didn't want to suffer.

Question 2. Hell yeah, sign me up. I'd love to see what the future holds. If you don't like it, there's always a way out.

edit on 17-11-2014 by DAVID64 because: spelling



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 06:33 PM
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a reply to: Cuervo

Heh, if they bring me back without permission they're going to find out just how mean a barbarian from the past can be like Demolition Man


But seriously, I'd be pissed if I had spent the last hundred years dead only to wake up and find that "nope you have to be alive because of x reason!"

And again, unless things start turning for the better I'd rather not see what the future looks like. Or see that I did something really bad and I'm being brought back to life to serve punishment. If that was the case, I'd jump off a tall building onto my head.

Try to resurrect that!



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 07:27 PM
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Nope, not for me. I think I'll just stick with the standard get-reincarnated-again-and-again-until-you-finally-get-it-right thang.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 08:00 PM
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Let me die in peace.




posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 08:44 PM
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a reply to: ChefSlug

Life is a beautiful and terrible thing. It is also exhausting.

Would I want to be woken from the eternal slumber, to a world which has forgotten me? In which nothing is familiar, in which nothing is as it was when I died? No. No I would not want that. Nor would I want to be able to watch the passage of the years drag by, year on year, decade on decade, century on century and so on. I personally believe that the weight of a persons failures after a functional eternity of life, would be such that their psyches would collapse under the pressure.

Give me sixty years, maybe eighty if I feel like punishing myself for anything, and then let it end. I have no use, nor desire for more years of living than are natural to us now. Even the span of just those relatively few years seems like a bloody hassle ahead rather than a boon some days, so I would rather not add to them overmuch!



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 09:02 PM
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I certainly hope I don't leave enough of myself to create an accurate representation. To those who do, great! I know I'll never understand the motivation but different strokes and such.



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Bravo!



posted on Nov, 17 2014 @ 11:39 PM
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a reply to: ChefSlug

It sounds like you read Philip J. Farmer's Riverworld. Excellent series!
I just love the interplay of all the historical figures in the books.



posted on Nov, 18 2014 @ 07:20 AM
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hell yes i would do it.....i want to live my friend.
i think humans will be cloned long before the year 3040

i would love to 'wake up' a hundred years from now and scope it out...
if i already died once i can do it again....if after a week or so i dont like what i see, i will handle it and go back to the big sleep.



posted on Nov, 18 2014 @ 08:37 PM
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a reply to: ChefSlug

Yes, I believe it is entirely possible, or at least it will be within a few generations of mankind.

As for myself, I'd chose not to do it - why? Think about this: What is one thing that large corporations (such as the ones that would be offering this option) like to gather on people? Data. They want to know what you like, what you do, and what items they can offer you to make money for themselves. Now, remember, in either scenario (robot, or virtual reality), you probably won't have a choice over the hardware you are installed in or on; so for all you know, the machine could have some kind of tracking.

Also, my question (which will probably be unanswered), is: It takes power to run your simulation, or power your robot. What happens should you lose power? If you are like a machine, every time you suddenly lose power, a small portion of your memory becomes corrupt. That would be a fate worse than death, in my opinion.

-fossilera




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