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The Great Pyramid and the "Plutonium Mill" Hypothesis

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posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 10:13 AM
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Up to this day, the true purpose of the Great Pyramid at Giza is still shrouded in mystery. But if we discard the tradional "tomb theory" for a moment and look at Khufu's Pyramid from a different, more technical point of view, it may turn out to have served a very concrete scientific and economic purpose. At least according to three engineers who published a thought-provoking paper some years back.

But first let's have a look at the internal structure of the Great Pyramid:



The interior design of the Great Pyramid (from now on "GP") suggests that the creators had a 'functional design' in mind. Now, I'm well aware of the fact that many theories have been proposed on why the GP could have been a "machine" of some sort (eg. by Chris Dunn). However, there is just this one essay that seems to account for all the chambers, materials, shafts and other structural features of the GP in a meaningful way. And if they are right(?), their insights would be awe-inspiring and intriguing.

At first I thought this was 'bogus'. But then I realized that E. Miller, S. Sloan and G. Wilson are meticulously making quite a serious case for their plutonium processing theory based on insights gained from the Nuclear Production Complex at Hanford in Washington. The main idea being that pellets or bricks of uranium oxide were placed inside the granite sarcophagus while water flooded the king's chamber through the southern shaft. In this concept, water plays a major role because:


... it is the medium, which slows down neutrons and reflects them back into the uranium oxide pile. It is also the mechanism for removing heat from the chamber. The south “air shaft” from the outside to the chamber would have been a pipe for continuously adding water to the system.


The by-products generated in the process (steam and radioactive water) would either exit the chamber via the northern shaft (steam) or end up flowing down the trench of the Grand Gallery (water), from where it is flushed down into the subterranean chamber right into the lower layers of sand (where it is gradually filtered).

Since the authors did not include any diagrams or images, I tried to visualize the concept (to some degree). I'm not sure whether I got it 100% right, but it seems to match the text quite well. So here's a general look at what they theorize could have happened in the King's Chamber:

Click Here For Fullsize Image

Please note that the reaction creates extremely high pressures in the upper section of the chamber, thus pushing down water and steam to the north shaft & the antechamber. The column of water in the south shaft also presses down into the chamber (due to it's length).

While reading the paper, it helped imagining the running of the reactor with a two-step concept: 1. functions of the passages, shafts and chambers 'during' a batch-run of uranium oxide and 2. functions of the pyramid architecture after a potion of uranium ore has been 'spent' so to speak (make sure to check the fullsize images):

Click Here For Fullsize Image


Click Here For Fullsize Image


Needless to say, some aspects of their theory leave certain questions unanswered (at least to me), but the general idea is still fascinating as far as I'm concerned. I can only encourage you to give the original full-text paper a read, here goes a list of topics discussed in the essay:

- The Development of Nuclear Energy
- Official Egyptian History of The Great Pyramid
- Technical Construction of The GP
- Material Contrasts With Other Pyramids
- Functional Nature of The GP
- Shutting Down the Great Pyramid
- Economic Justification of the GP
- The Second Pyramid at Giza
- Methodologies For Scientific Proof of Nuclear Fission in The GP

It's also interesting that they describe why short-lived izotopes with very limited half-lives would be impossible to track down today. But they also address how the former presence of heavier izotopes could be measured today, provided that proper measurements and analyses were conducted.


The Great Pyramid at Giza (Scroll to Bottom)

If the internals of the Great Pyramid were a nuclear breeder system, then there was a sizable wash through of water, which went to the Bottom Chamber. From there the water would have descended to an underground sand layer. Assuming retention of the uranium and plutonium oxides, the major, soluble, radioactive isotopes are Cesium-137 and Strontium-90. Because they have half-lives of 30 years and 28 years, respectively, they would no longer be detectable.


As mentioned by Miller (et al.) in their paper, the "plutonium mill concept" would have required some electrical & mechanical equipment being present in the GP during the time of operations. That machinery would have been removed from the Pyramid after the shutdown. Of course we have no evidence for that, but the geometry of the GP is IMO intriguing enough to at least discuss such an idea.

Lastly, however, I think that the King's Chamber was indeed designed to contain some kind of fluid (most likely water), because on the 'great step' in the gallery, there is a V-shaped water slope that IMO can only be associated with the aforementioned purpose:



So if the assumptions of this pamphlet hold true, then the Ancient Egyptians would indeed have been a so-called adaption society, to whom the pyramids were already ancient when they discovered them. They would have incorporated these forgotten buildings into their culture, adding glyhps and creating their own mythology based on the abandoned infrastructure.

I'm in no way expert enough to say whether or not the interior geometry of the GP would really be perfectly suited to produce considerable amounts of plutonium, but I'm quite certain that the GP had a function other than that of a "tomb".

Ultimately, I think it's an interesting alternative viewpoint despite the many open questions and the plethora of assumptions they make. Whether it explains the true purpose of the GP or not, I'm very much looking forward to what others might think about that theory ... !



Sources & Links:
----------------------------------------------

01. Essay: Great Pyramid of Giza (Miller/Sloan/Wilson)
02. Concept of a Pressurized Water Reactor
03. Animation: Nuclear Power Plant
04. Information about Plutonium
05. Light Water Reactor (Concept)
06. Hanford Site, Nuclear Production Complex
07. The Canyon Buildings, Hanford Site
08. U Plant (221-U Facility), Hanford Site




posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r

Very interesting theory and amazing job laying it all out!!

I wonder if this was true, would we be able to, today, try this theory out and see if it still works? Wouldn't that solve the mystery if this was widely accepted as the "reason" these are here?

Again, awesome job OP!!



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 10:25 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r




Lastly, however, I think that the King's Chamber was indeed designed to contain some kind of fluid (most likely water), because on the 'great step' in the gallery, there is a V-shaped water slope that IMO can only be associated with the aforementioned purpose:


Can it not be associated to wear and abrasion by the ropes used to haul the granite blocks up the grand gallery?

Was this not also the grand gallery's purpose?



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 10:37 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r

interesting theory..

Question though -
Why would our ancestors use the pyramids to create plutonium? Based on our known history it seems.... odd ... that our ancestors had this technology yet built the Pyramids from stone.

Also wouldn't the Pyramids show signs of radioactivity? in general the half life of Plutonium is 65-75 million years +/-



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 10:50 AM
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Even if they weren't producing Plutonium, those diagrams would explain how they managed to work in the darkness carving and drawing figures and keeping the dust down. They could wash and sweep all the debris down the floor and the groove mentioned. The shafts could be used as extractor or air conditioning vents by using bellows or blow or suck air along.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 10:50 AM
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a reply to: Xcathdra

Well, I think that some kind of radiation should be measurable if that theory is correct (perhaps in the sandlayers of the underground chamber?).

But regarding your question: I don't think the Miller (et. al.) were concerned about the plutonium (which would, of course, have been removed prior to the shutdown of the pyramid). They were rather thinking about the izotopes that would be created when taking apart uranium 238 in the sarcophagus and how they managed to built a more or less self-sustaining system within the pyramid.

Traces of the izotopes could perhaps be detected (unless it's caesium or strontium), it would certainly be interesting to see whether any radiation levels have been measured at the GP ... I might look into that again!



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 10:51 AM
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Nicely laid out post and I read the original paper. Besides the complete and utter lack of any sort of technical infrastructure to support such a contention, the pyramid shows no sign of 'hard' use in this matter. One must also ask what did they do with the bodies of God-Kings?

In the paper the writers took on a number of fringe theories to use as support which again points to the ideas greatest weakness; the AE culture simply doesn't support the possibility.

A brownie point for thinking out of the box but - 2 tin squares for just being silly.

edit on 23/10/14 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r

Could the sand in the pit mentioned be tested for evidence that radioactive material was there at one time? I know the article mentioned the short half lives of two isotopes but is there something left over that could indicate the presence of radiation, perhaps deep in the sand?

The idea that the ancient Egyptians were an adaptive society makes a lot more sense than them building the pyramids with the tools and tech taught today.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 11:24 AM
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Adaptive

One of the more interesting ideas is the notion that somehow a highly technical society, equal to or superior to our own. Existed in the near past and that despite having superior technology like to build large building out of limestone cut out by primitive methods; more remarkably absolutely nothing of this civilization survives; not a single thing except these stone monuments and building. Equally remarkably is that this society was able to create an advance technological structure without using the resources of the earth, with creating any pollution, cities, burials, tools, or anything else.

This lost civilization remains the 'holy grail' of alternative and fringe researchers; who to this day search endlessly for it despite the vast evidence against it and none for it.

However, it does make for some good readin'.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 11:39 AM
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a reply to: jeep3r

We are trying to understand the past through the lens of the present. How could we ever arrive at the correct answer with this methodology? I've heard people proclaim that "They wouldn't have done it if it wasn't easy, so they must have had some technology we don't know about." Such is the thought of a very comfortable generation.

If you are being fed by a centralized agricultural government to twist rope all day and grind blocks to pay homage to the ego of a king and the fantasies of a priestly class, you aren't going to care how hard the work is, it is still more comfortable and bestows more status and less insecurity than being a hunter/gatherer or small time farmer. One drought could wipe you out if you are on you own. If you are on the Pharaoh's payroll, then your income is guaranteed.

Has anyone thought these chambers could be purely for psychological effect? When you walk through a small tunnel and come out into a grand gallery, it creates an emotional impact. This is like artwork. It doesn't need an engineering purpose. These priestly classes were creating an emotional experience. That, I think, is the lens that leads towards understanding.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 11:42 AM
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Nice Post.
Even though many are so adamant about the pyramids being built for the 'sole' purpose of being a tomb. I am glad that we have people that will consider or even entertain the possibility of completely different functions, or having multiple purposes. We can't be so arrogant to believe that we have it all figured out. We know this is far from true. We like to base our progression off of technological advancements but we still lack the moral capacity to match our recent leaps in technology.
The absence of evidence does not equal the evidence of absence. When the data is carefully analyzed and thoroughly reviewed we can see the smoking gun of a much, much bigger project. Perhaps the most elaborate, detailed construction ever erected on Earth.

.......But from the outside in its just a tomb.

I really appreciate your approach.
Personally I agree with your approach. In my humble opinion and based off of my analysis I believe it had even more functions and you covered quite a bit.

Do not stop your journey. If I could give you 2 stars I would.
I am excited that the 'tombers', 'space debris', 'weather balloon', 'swamp gas', 'its a rock, I'm certain because I been to the moon, mars and back', PEOPLE ARE RUNNING OUT OF STEAM. THE TIMES ARE CHANGING.


Incredible Post.
edit on 23-10-2014 by AKINOFTHEFIRSSTARS because: correction



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 11:51 AM
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a reply to: Nechash

Good idea but the emotional impact would have been from crossing the Nile, disembarking, going up the long causeway to the enormous pyramids, into the old necropolis that existed there and onto the black surfaced plateau studded with other monuments and smaller pyramids and into Khufu's mortuary temple - which hopefully was full of priests, a place to sacrifice and see statues of the deceased Pharaoh.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 12:20 PM
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Nah...


I'm leaning towards a 10,000+/- year old 'Harmonic/acoustical/vibrational DNA/Cellular rejuvenation chamber sorta thingy type machine'

This is why the pre-dynastic/pre-pharaonic ancient Egyptian 'Kings' supposedly lived so long. Them and their cousins over in Sumer.

That's off the record and not open for discussion.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 12:55 PM
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originally posted by: SLAYER69
Nah...


I'm leaning towards a 10,000+/- year old 'Harmonic/acoustical/vibrational DNA/Cellular rejuvenation chamber sorta thingy type machine'

This is why the pre-dynastic/pre-pharaonic ancient Egyptian 'Kings' supposedly lived so long. Them and their cousins over in Sumer.

That's off the record and not open for discussion.



Well its off the record but I would say, if it were open for discussion, that your idea is several leagues ahead of the threads main concept!



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 01:07 PM
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a reply to: Hanslune


Stay tuned.

LOL

'Tuned'



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: jeep3r

Interesting theory. The Great pyramid was used for something, I have never bought in to the idea that it was built as a tomb for Khufu, it just doesn't make sense. The tomb theory relies on graffiti as evidence. This theory makes much more sense than the tomb theory.

The Great Pyramid as a power plant makes the most sense, what kind of power it was producing though, is the question.

Great OP!



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 01:57 PM
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I would say the 3 chambers, kings uppermost, queens mid, lower subterranean,,, all represent places in the religious belief system. The Kings is the realm of the Gods the queens is the realm of earth the subterranean is the underworld of death and such. The grand gallery leading to the kings chamber would be logically the most splendid signifying the journey to the realm of the gods.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 02:02 PM
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originally posted by: Hanslune
Nicely laid out post and I read the original paper. Besides the complete and utter lack of any sort of technical infrastructure to support such a contention, the pyramid shows no sign of 'hard' use in this matter. One must also ask what did they do with the bodies of God-Kings?

In the paper the writers took on a number of fringe theories to use as support which again points to the ideas greatest weakness; the AE culture simply doesn't support the possibility.

A brownie point for thinking out of the box but - 2 tin squares for just being silly.


The brownie point is much appreciated ... thanks!

On the other hand: I could imagine that in a quiet moment (when you're not thinking in terms of mainstream Egyptology) you too have certainly at some point thought about a technical purpose of the GP, I suppose?

Whatever the case, the grand gallery indeed sometimes seems to be linked to harmonics (due to it's design, provided that it's not just artwork). But then again, the way its function is compared to how radioactive waste has been processed at Hanford in the so-called 'canyon buildings', was also very intriguing to me.

Form follows function. I really like that quote from the essay!
edit on 23-10-2014 by jeep3r because: text



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 02:10 PM
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originally posted by: midicon
Can it not be associated to wear and abrasion by the ropes used to haul the granite blocks up the grand gallery?
Was this not also the grand gallery's purpose?


In Egyptology that is certainly the way to explain the slope.

But if it was fabricated and cut that way, it would narrow the exiting stream of water and 'channel' it directly into the central trench which runs all the way down to the bottom of the Grand Gallery.



posted on Oct, 23 2014 @ 02:20 PM
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originally posted by: SLAYER69

I'm leaning towards a 10,000+/- year old 'Harmonic/acoustical/vibrational DNA/Cellular rejuvenation chamber sorta thingy type machine'. This is why the pre-dynastic/pre-pharaonic ancient Egyptian 'Kings' supposedly lived so long. Them and their cousins over in Sumer.

That's off the record and not open for discussion.


Before coming across the essay referenced in the OP, I was also in favor of the Grand Gallery serving a different purpose, possibly related to 'sound & harmonics'. Difficult to say, what it actually did. But in general I think that the GP was some type of production facility, a machine, possibly a power plant.

... in the end, I think these guys did a very good job at pointing us towards a different explanation, however 'uncomfortable' the thought of a plutonium production facility might be.

As said, I still remain open to all kinds of possibilities but I agree with the authors that the internal structure & geometry of the GP has a strong industrial signature to it!



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