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Inside a Jet Engine

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posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 06:30 PM
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A fantastic info-graphic showing the differences between military and civil engines - very good for a quick education. It is fairly accurate too! Thought you all would enjoy this.




posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 06:36 PM
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Very cool !



posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 06:39 PM
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Wonderful graphics. Especially since they are animated as well.



posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 06:50 PM
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a reply to: aholic

Nice. It should be pinned and be required reading before posting in the aviation forum.



posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 07:29 PM
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Mmmm
Now, I know why birds don't come out the same way as they went in!

Silly humans still using atmosphere to fly..........



posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 10:26 PM
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Awesome info graph! I love it. It's very informative and I haven't seen one like this before. I wish they made ones like these for every mechanical system.



posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 10:48 PM
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Linky?



posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 11:02 PM
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a reply to: brice

animagraffs.com...

Original with larger pictures.



posted on Oct, 12 2014 @ 11:08 PM
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coooooooooool

seriously really neat, i too would appreciate a link.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 01:03 AM
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LINK For those asking

Great thread OP

Oops, see I was beaten to it.

It's hard to wrap your mind around something that's essentially encased. Love this kind of thing.
edit on 1320141020141 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 01:34 AM
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There are also a few decent videos if one want to go into more depth...




posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 01:35 AM
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a reply to: aholic

That is a neat graphical representation you have found!

I especially enjoy the one which features the exhaust nozzle, since it covers one of the most basic but most often overlooked issues with jet propulsion, that being the incredible danger that can come of any back pressures building up in the system!



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 01:37 AM
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I know next to nothing about this, but i still find it fascinating.

So question.

I'm looking at the graphic and I see the high bypass and low bypass fans.

So (fast) military craft use the low bypass and civilian or military transport use high bypass.

Would it be feasible to make an engine that could do both (and more)? Something that was big but could completely change how the air was moved relative to speed? The fans could fan out, the body (of the engine) could enlarge... If you could control all the surface sizes couldn't you get something that was pretty freaking fast and also able to shift into "economy mode"? If you added a little friend to the system could you get something that could cruise and be airborne with good economy for a long period of time that could also go fast? /--- AND --- and some combinations.

I'm probably totally off but I'm thinking of a newer thing being able to "shift gears".

Been focused on the ass when we should look at the whole digestive track? |Tract|




edit on 1320141020141 by Domo1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 02:15 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

As far as I know, there are no engines which could perform with the characteristics of both a high, and a low bypass engine. However, that is not to say that such things are not possible with the technology we have available as a species, far from it.

I would have thought that such a thing might be perfectly possible in the next little while. The main issue however, is that in order to have the characteristics of both, the actual physical size of the engine would have to remain large, and the air flow through it would have to be regulated down in flight by some means, in order to access the low bypass behaviour familiar to combat pilots.

This would however, present a problem. You see, jet engines are heavy, and large jet engines are heavier, obviously, than small ones. There are therefore, two main problems. One, if you could reduce the airflow through the high bypass fan, and make your engine behave like a low bypass one, that might mean that there simply would not be enough power to keep the massive engine, and the airframe, aloft in stable flight. Also, an aircraft with a large jet engine, has a larger target profile, and what with the obsession with stealth aircraft that defence manufacturing firms have, that would not be something I would expect them to accept.

I think if we reach a point where we can achieve the advantages of both a high, and a low bypass engine, it will be only when we have discarded fuel burning engines completely, and moved on to other methods. Perhaps the next leap in avionics will not be with regard to any kind of a jet at all!



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 02:23 AM
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a reply to: Domo1

We are doing just that. www.geaviation.com...

Also the SR-71 [along with a few other aircraft] had expanding nozzles at the intake that would control the bypass air. But that was intended for extreme high speeds not necessarily economy.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 05:08 PM
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a reply to: aholic

Suck, squeeze, bang, blow.

That's all you need to know.

:p

On the Blackhawk the T701D GE turboshaft engine does not have an after burner. Instead of producing thrust it turns a high speed shaft that turns the main rotor system.

Generally all jet engines work the same.



posted on Oct, 13 2014 @ 09:16 PM
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a reply to: aholic

If rumors hold true they should be making there official debut in the LRS-B's



posted on Oct, 20 2014 @ 01:39 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

I think we are right. I could see other uses on combat aerial drones as well. Loiter efficiency is becoming all the rage these days.




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