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Satellite images reveal shocking groundwater loss in California

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posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 09:46 PM
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The G.R.A.C.E. satellites which have been in orbit since 2002 to map the Earth's gravity have made some disturbing discoveries pertaining to California's groundwater. Even though Grace studies gravity, the groundwater discovery was made because groundwater affects gravity in a given area. You can see in the images taken by GRACE in 2002, 2008, and 2014 how dangerously depleted the groundwater is in California.



“Most climate models indicate that by the end of this century, the dry regions of the world will become drier,” hydrology researchers James S. Famiglietti of UC Irvine and Matthew Rodell of NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., wrote in a Perspective essay published last week in the journal Science. “Meanwhile, groundwater reserves, the traditional backup for water supplies during extended periods of drought, are in decline globally.”

And especially in California.


What does ATS have to say about this information?

www.latimes.com...




posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 09:55 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Yep, we're parched here.

But some water is still "reserved".


The rules include exemptions for public health and safety, such as allowing cities to power-wash alleyways to get rid of human waste left by homeless people, to scrub away graffiti and to remove oil and grease from parking structure floors.

As usual

Just don't water your plants or wash your driveway.


edit on 2-10-2014 by intrptr because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 09:58 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Too many people live in Cali.

2nd



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: lostbook

Interesting I can only assume that from the pic the red orange areas are showing less density/gravity and determine that the underground water basins are depleting.




posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:02 PM
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I read the drought has impacted 100% of the state. Can anybody confirm this? We're irresponsible as a whole. Being poor stewards of the land is biting us back very hard.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:07 PM
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a reply to: Grimpachi


I have to ponder the effect of that large a mass being "gone" from the already notoriously unstable geography?

It must have made itself felt in ways other than those requiring a satellite to see.

A "hippy" friend of mine would say that when ''civilization' moved to that part of the world they fully intended to 'squeeze it dry.' You have to wonder that this is precisely what they've done.



posted on Oct, 2 2014 @ 10:36 PM
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I can tell you I live in an area where much of so cal gets their water, we have springs ALL OVER the place, but we are still facing restrictions because we ship much of our fresh water down to LA.

I don't feel like my area is necessarily in severe drought, we HAVE water, but we have to send it away, and we suffer. DWP owns the majority of land up here. LADWP has sucked the Owens valley dry for decades . . .

a reply to: Yeahkeepwatchingme



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 01:00 AM
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I live in Orange, Orange County, California and today I passed the reservoir today for the first time in a couple years. The last time I drove by I was very concerned with how low the water level was, however, when I drove by today my jaw dropped. It was pretty much empty; you could even see the ground in some parts.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:53 AM
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originally posted by: Voyaging
I live in Orange, Orange County, California and today I passed the reservoir today for the first time in a couple years. The last time I drove by I was very concerned with how low the water level was, however, when I drove by today my jaw dropped. It was pretty much empty; you could even see the ground in some parts.


I used to live in L.A. From 96-03 and the water situation was getting bad back then as I remember.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 11:17 AM
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I just have a question/ opinion about this situation. Since California is on the Pacific Ocean, why do they not get ALL of their water from the ocean. Desalination plants would prove to be efficient. That way all the Colorado River and the aquifer that feeds it would not have to be drained.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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CA never got much water to begin with. The state is simply not suited to support such a large population.
Cutting the state in half and NOT sending water to the southern half would be a great way to help conserve water - I want to be back out of here before the water is "depleted" - can't imagine what will happen then.

~Sovereign



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 07:31 PM
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a reply to: Ceeker63

Current Desalination isn't very cost effective yet.

What we should have done long ago is create our own water inlet into a river from the ocean that naturally starts the desalination process.



posted on Oct, 3 2014 @ 08:05 PM
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Well when the "big one" hits, California won't have ANY shortage of water . . . allegedly . . .








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