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Lets discuss UFO books

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posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 12:39 AM
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I own a massive library of UFO books and everything unexplained and Cryptid.

My question to some of you fine people, is what are some great UFO books that have recently came out within the past 1-2 years? (or ARE coming out soon in the coming months) that will be must reads?

I do not keep up with new releases and such like I used to. So I am curious if any of you are in this loop.

Thanks much!
edit on 27-9-2014 by Vrill because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 01:35 AM
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a reply to: Vrill

Nick Redfern's been working on a new book that aims to explain the Hills case as an MKULTRA exercise. I'm looking forward to the book to see if he can 'make the case' convincingly. He's going to face resistance from the people who accept the skeptical position of the event being a series of coincidences that were misinterpreted by Betty's imagination and transferred to Barney. Likewise, those who believe it was a genuine 'waylaying' of the couple by buccaneering aliens from Zeta will be against the terrestrial explanation.

I've no urge to commit to any particular explanation, but Betty's verbal description of the faces has often left me with an image of someone in a mask. She described the mouths as having a membrane within them which could be a description of someone's lips moving behind the mouth of a mask. *If* there was an MKULTRA element, it would presumably be occurring with the Hills under a mind-altering substance.

Where the book really interests me is the potential for it to explain one or two of my favourite cases: Higdon, Wilcox and Masse.

Aside from the resistance, a few folk will be quick to use MKULTRA as an explanation for everything because it's human nature to keep their explanations simple.

Of the recent books, Lambright's 'X Descending' and Valdez' Dulce 'The Truth and Evidence From the Case Files of Gabe Valdez' are a good read and very reasonably priced on Amazon. Mike Swords' 'Grassroots UFOs' and 'UFOs and Government' are excellent.

In 'Grassroots,' there are some crazy and intriguing reports. One or two recollect military men in the early 50s being asked to enter hangars where there were bodies and wreckage laid out. They were asked to look at the 'small bodies' and, once outside, given pencil and paper and asked to describe what they saw. If true, two scenarios spring to mind.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 01:42 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

Thank you Kandinsky! Much appreciated!

I actually just finished Nick Pope's newest book on the Rendlesham case. Its pretty good, but much of it was a rehash of things that we already know.

I'd only recommend it to people who either are not familiar with the case, or have never read about it in depth much.

Its one of my favorite cases. So I had to have it.

I think I prefer the Left at East Gate book a little more than Pope's though.

edit on 27-9-2014 by Vrill because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 01:53 AM
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I wish that there was a bit more detail on Larry Warren's episode when he was forcibly taken to some underground cavernous complex under the base there (or near the base?) and was shown a monitor screen with a Grey on it that the people there supposedly conversed with.

And the Men in Black ordeal where he was forced to watch numerous UFOs on a film projector inside of some dark room. Then sworn to secrecy afterwards.

These are the most profound and interesting tidbits of that entire Rendlesham affair to me. I'd like more information. But alas~
edit on 27-9-2014 by Vrill because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 02:16 AM
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a reply to: Vrill

Rendlesham is one of the cases that doesn't interest me as much as it does for yourself and others. It's like Roswell, lots of versions and scores of people emphatically banging the drum that their own interpretation is correct. Also, when LMH gets involved in something, you can kiss its credibility goodbye.

Nick Pope doesn't appeal to me. He straddles the middle-ground so successfully that his UFO books are like a warm bowl of porridge - edible enough, but you'd hardly be reminiscing about it at lunchtime.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 02:25 AM
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What are your general thoughts on Richard Dolan, Kandinsky? I own all of his books too. Ive always respected him as a man and a researcher. His books are always excellent reads. Especially his "UFOs and the National Security State" series. He is writing the 3rd one as we speak that is up to current day. He just puts the evidence out there and leaves it up to the reader to decide what to believe.

However, he has been beating that "Breakaway Civilization" drum a lot recently. I am not sure what to think about that.

Also, what are your thoughts on Timothy Good?
edit on 27-9-2014 by Vrill because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 02:40 AM
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a reply to: Vrill

Like you, I respect him and still think Rich Dolan is losing his way. He started off committed to details and history and has now gone 100% into the breakaway civilisation. The history of ufology is littered with some good minds who became befuddled in their search for answers so it's not a negative as much as an observation.

The 'breakaway civilisation' is one of those new, original ideas that authors occasionally come up with and then stick with them as they separate that author from the crowd. Interviews and conference circuits are the prize for identifiable personalities. Micah Hanks is the 'singularity' guy, Dolan's the 'breakaway civilisation' guy, Friedman's the 'prison planet' guy etc. You have to have a theme to make a name in the UFO business. I choose these three examples as they probably believe their 'themes,' and aren't hoaxing in the conventional sense.

Tim Good is a similar person imo. He started off with more facts than speculation and then began to accept almost anything on face value. I've enjoyed his interviews more than his books and some stories have grown better, more interesting in time. I'd like to have a conversation with Timothy Good because one of his accounts has struck a private chord with me.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 02:46 AM
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Yeah, I was going to mention that. It seems like a lot of authors get away from their original way of thinking and get off course into a quagmire of new theories and get caught up in it and ultimately lose their way as you mentioned.

I do have a question though. Is Dolan piggybacking off of Joseph Farrell's Breakaway Civilization theory? Or the other way around? I know that Farrell has a trilogy of books that are solely dedicated to the Breakaway Civilization theory, however, its more Nazi slanted.

Or did the whole "Breakaway Civilization" theory come from someone else? Where did it originate from? For some reason, I want to say that it came from Jim Keith, aka Commander X.
edit on 27-9-2014 by Vrill because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 02:53 AM
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a reply to: Vrill

We should make coffee


I can't get into Farrell's books and have tried. At the same time, I think the ufology field is limited to a handful of core ideas that have been rebranded or given new clothes since the 1940s. I once posted a thread that compared ufology from the 50s with nowadays and nothing had changed.

Aliens (good/bad)
Demons (Biblical, Quaranic)
CIA (MiLabs, abductions, MKULTRA etc)
Secret technology (German, Japanese, USA)
Ancient astronauts (lost races, Martians, breakaway civs etc)
Hoaxers

These are the basics and everything we see today is riffing on the same themes. Saying that, the 70s/80s consciousness and UFOs ideas were a new idea. Control systems, psychic outliers and so forth.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 02:58 AM
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a reply to: Kandinsky

I agree wholeheartedly. I think that the entire subject is too cloudy now and a lot more complex than it needs to be with too many moving parts. There are so many stories within stories. Its hard to follow at times.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 03:15 AM
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Another book I'd recommend is Richard Hall's UFO Evidence: A Thirty Year Report. Although its a bit pricey.

Another good one, is CE-5: Close Encounters of the Fifth Kind by Richard Haines.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 03:29 AM
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Speaking of MILABS, I cannot find that Helmut and Marion Lammer MILAB book for a decent price anywhere. I'll be damned if im paying 70+ dollars for a 160 page book, LOL

edit on 27-9-2014 by Vrill because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 03:48 AM
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Hi Vrill. Need to get some new books, just get the old ones from a book dealer locally. Every time I mention where's your ufo section (he moves stock around lots) he gives me a right weird look lol. Love the book UFO Encyclopeadia by Margaret Sachs.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 03:56 AM
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a reply to: ufoorbhunter

Thank you! That is a book I have never heard of before, I'll check it out!



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 04:03 AM
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Kandinsky, I seem to recall you saying once, that you love the strange and odd tales of UFO lore. Stuff that isn't as widely known etc.

Know any books that fit that bill?



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 04:59 AM
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The Welsh Triangle by Peter Paget is a good read. Thing is though it centres on Pembrokeshire in the south west, while the stories around the Snowdonia/north are also quite interesting. Anyone know a book about the north?

The Fire Came By is also very interesting stuff. John Baxter & Thomas Atkins. About the Siberian explosion in 1908.

a reply to: Vrill


edit on 27-9-2014 by ufoorbhunter because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 08:19 AM
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I just finished reading UFO Highway by Anthony Sanchez. I'm sure you've probably already read it or heard about it since it came out a few years ago. The interview with Colonel X talking about Dulce in great detail is the highlight of the book.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: Vrill

well if you haven't read the books by Charles fort yet, albeit not new, they may have some interesting story's from yesteryear. like the case of the flying railed platform in the late 1800's ,suited figures riding around on a very small platform, with a rail in Victorian England , the books are full of storeys like this and other similar ufo tales and a wealth of hypothesis and speculation

four books there are :

the book of the damned
lo!
new lands
wild talents

or you can get them in one called "the complete works of Charles Fort"

funbox



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 10:21 AM
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a reply to: ufoorbhunter
Is this book like MASSIVELY huge??. I think I have seen it at my library and its size is something to behold.



posted on Sep, 27 2014 @ 12:34 PM
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Everything by Jim Marrs is worth reading, Plus he's a member of ATS. Keep it local eh!

www.abovetopsecret.com...



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