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Can a Citizens Band Network Be Practical?

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posted on Jan, 19 2015 @ 06:56 AM
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I've been in contact with a number of people interested in this project, however, most of them seem to not want to do anything, not even hookup a mobile CB in their car. Then there are those who have been looking into it and want to go Ham and get the license with the belief that the CB is a toy, something no one who is in to two-way would give any consideration these days. Not at all true, many Hams still talk on the CB when there is no action on the amateur bands and many unlicensed CBers use excessive power and talk on licensed bands illegally. Not like the 70s, but still going strong in my opinion, just have a listen, you'll see.

CB is just another radio band, with pros and cons like any other of the licensed bands. The popularity of CB is way down since it's hay day, but so is amateur use, although there is a renewed and growing interest from the survival and prepper crowd in shortwave. The Hams are always trying to recruit, to get people to register a call sign and sell their soul to the man, just to increase their exclusive club membership.

However, I believe that the unlicensed freqs can be effective for the average Joe prepper that doesn't want to be listed, full name and address, on the licensed amateur radio service call sign lists. There are tons of people still using CBs, undoubtedly more than Hams, it is not a toy if used properly. Consider the bicycle, yeah, a kids toy, a way for kids to travel without a driver's license, but bikes are complex and amazing, far more than a toy, and with a history that contributed to the development of motorcycles and even cars. It may be the only choice for travel in many SHTF scenarios, and I think the same for the CB. Today's toys are yesterday's cutting edge tech, they are still of use if you know what you are doing.

I would hope people can broaden their perspective and see that the CB and other unlicensed freqs are all part of the same thing, wireless two-way communications, and that a license to use more bands isn't a badge of authority or status, but an elite attitude against people who use the unlicensed bands.

So the Ham is part of an exclusive club, but DXing on lower HF bands and use of repeaters isn't going to help with local talk with people who just want to be able to communicate when the normal lines are down. Talk to that guy a 1,000 plus miles away, will he help you get food, water and safe shelter when the SHTF? Will those repeaters continue to work when the grid is down? Will your aging Ham buddies be too busy with the officials to help you out personally? These questions are not being asked too much, but should be.

CB is an open crowd source media, free for anyone to use. IMO, citizens band is the way to reach everyone without prejudice and an established federal hierarchy to keep your communications in line with F.C.C. policies and rules. They are free for your use, why not use it?
edit on 19-1-2015 by MichiganSwampBuck because: Typo




posted on Jul, 17 2015 @ 12:43 PM
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We used to have something like this in Belgium, around the 60's or 70's, but now a days it's forbidden in Belgium to transmit messages using radios, or to have underground radiostations. shame tho, I would love to have a CB in my car when I get one, would be very handy to know what happens on the road (I.E. a trucker wiht an CB radio stands in a traffic jam 20 Km further infront of me und warns his buddies about it), I would lvoe to communicate long distances too wiht a CB, but yeah



posted on Aug, 23 2015 @ 07:24 AM
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originally posted by: Rasponov
We used to have something like this in Belgium, around the 60's or 70's, but now a days it's forbidden in Belgium to transmit messages using radios, or to have underground radiostations. shame tho, I would love to have a CB in my car when I get one, would be very handy to know what happens on the road (I.E. a trucker wiht an CB radio stands in a traffic jam 20 Km further infront of me und warns his buddies about it), I would lvoe to communicate long distances too wiht a CB, but yeah


It's too bad the laws have crept in and taken away the Belgium people's ability to communicate with unlicensed two-way radios legally. I would suspect that wireless digital communication corporations, cell phones and digital data, and government interests in air wave uses, have pushed the public off the air entirely.

I have been seeing some of that happening here in the states since the early 1980's. "If you don't use it, you lose it" and another good reason to keep using the unlicensed two-way frequencies.

I personally believe that licenses in the U.S. should be easier to get for low power AM and FM broadcast stations for communities to create their own local, network free, radio stations. It seems that the national networks have the market cornered and won't let up their grip.

The networks keep laws tough on low powered stations to prevent competition and if you broadcast a pirate signal, they get the F.C.C. to shut you down really quickly. The "I Heart Radio" network seems to be the only game in town these days.



 
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