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When your skin "smells" sandalewood oil ,it heals it's self.

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posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 10:45 PM
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The biggest organ on your body (skin) protects you from all kinds of things , why wouldn't it be able to smell ?


Anyway I found this very interesting .

I wonder what rubbing this stuff on your skin can do ?

Have a read !


In the past decade, scientists have discovered olfactory receptors lingering in strange places—in sperm, in the spine, and even in the kidneys. Now researchers in Hanns Hatt’s lab at Germany’s Ruhr University Bochum have identified scent receptors somewhere much more accessible: the skin. What’s more, these receptors appear to be involved in healing.




They found that Sandalore—a synthetic sandalwood oil used in aromatherapy, perfumes and skin care products—bound to an olfactory receptor in skin called OR2AT4. Rather than sending a message to the brain, as nose receptors do, the receptor triggered cells to divide and migrate, important processes in repairing damaged skin.

Cell proliferation increased by 32 per cent and cell migration by nearly half when keratinocytes [skin cells] in a test tube and in culture were mixed for five days with Sandalore.



www.pbs.org...




posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 11:16 PM
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Thanks for sharing this is so cool
I have always loved the smell of sandalwood (in some perfumes & in incense).
www.auracacia.com...
www.medicaldaily.com...
Wonder if the smell of rain or campfire are smelled by the skin also (some more of my favorite smells).
Any research on healing is an awesome thing. Will watch for updates on this.



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 11:18 PM
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Wow! That's amazing...I wonder if the natural oil would have the same effect? I guess not...

Human Skin Can “Smell” Odors


Specifically, cell proliferation increased by 32 percent and cell migration by nearly 50 percent when cultured keratinocytes were exposed to high concentrations Sandalore—1,000 times greater than is needed to activated olfactory receptors in the nose—for five days. Another synthetic sandalwood scent, called Brahmanol, had a similar effect, while other versions, including the natural compound, had none. The researchers published their results in Journal of Investigative Dermatology.

Skin's ability to 'smell' seems to help it heal itself


And there is genetic variability in human receptors, so your receptor might be a bit different from your neighbour's. It leaves open the question of whether receptors might differ so much between individuals that the synthetic sandalwood that benefits one person might be neutral or even toxic to another.

It seems like this synthetic molecule is actually less of a problem than it's natural brother in terms of allergies.


Then there’s the slightly more sophisticated level of ignorance: “A synthetic is more likely to cause an allergic reaction.” Wrong again. A natural is more apt to do that. Take Sandalore, a synthetic molecule that smells like sandalwood. It’s exactly one molecule: C14H26O. Use Sandalore to get your sandalwood note, and there will be only one possibility of an allergic reaction. Use a natural sandalwood, which contains hundreds of molecules — alpha- and beta-Santalol, Spirosantalol, beta-Curcumene, (Z)-Nucifero, etc. — and you’ve got hundreds of different possible allergic reactions. Moreover, synthetic sandalwoods are ecofriendly. The sandalwood forests of India are being destroyed at a terrible rate, and the price of natural sandalwood is skyrocketing (currently heading up to $800 a pound). One perfumer I know told me that because of this, he now refuses to use natural materials in perfumes.

SOURCE

Simple, effective and all while saving the environment. It's in many perfumes and colognes which ironically are sprayed onto the skin. Probably not the right concentration though.


edit on 11-7-2014 by eisegesis because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 11 2014 @ 11:58 PM
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Ever read 'Jitterbug Perfume' by Tom Robbins? It is a very entertaining novel that links the olfactory sense with immortality.
en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 01:29 AM
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I'll admit to being a fragrance freak and this is stunning news. Not only the healing possibilities of certain scents, but that the skin organ can actually smell, itself... this may explain sexual behaviors and why some people not only 'smell' right, but feel right to touch, and others don't.

Oddly, although I love fragrances, I rarely wear any and then they're always one note slam-downs, when I'm in the mood for a certain memory. Coconut, almond, lavender, orange blossom, vanilla, all from my childhood.

Two things I'd like to share even if off topic, because they're so wonderful; the Luca Turin book(s) about perfume, which have some of the most luscious and humorous writing possible about such an esoteric topic Perfume Book Read the reviews and you'll get the idea...

And one of the world's greatest boutique artisan perfumers, Makers of Love Potion #9 - anyone interested in perfumes could spend happy weeks here reading and dreaming. The pheromone mixes are great fun to experiment with!



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 01:36 AM
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Love Sandalwood and Amber and White Opium...
Whether they give these marvelous results...or not...I still love them!
(...and Honeysuckle, and White Ginger, and others...)



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 01:36 AM
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originally posted by: signalfire
I]... this may explain sexual behaviors and why some people not only 'smell' right, but feel right to touch, and others don't.

Perfume Book Read the reviews and you'll get the idea...


I just had this conversation last night. A woman I am attracted to asked me what I see in her. The easy answer was "I like the way you smell." It wasn't perfume. It was beer, tobacco, and sweat. I have shied away from otherwise attractive women because they didn't smell right for me. I love me some muskiness.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 01:39 AM
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a reply to: signalfire
Thank you, signalfire
Will be spending some time reading...at your recommendation.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 02:39 AM
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Posting so I can read all of this tomorrow. I want to find out how much to use, and how it promotes healing. I'm also hopeful synthetic is just as effective. I would think it wouldn't be but in my limited reading it appears it is.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 02:43 AM
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Nothing promotes longevity like waking up to the smell of bacon cooking.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 05:49 AM
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a reply to: LightningStrikesHere

So cool. It makes sense since your skin is derived from the same embryological area as the nervous system is.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 11:24 AM
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Maybe their is some truth to burning incents for healing?
The native Americans might have had it right ...


Just saying!



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 02:37 PM
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a reply to: LightningStrikesHere

I wonder what this means for people like myself who became allergic to scent like perfumes. Maybe the reason we get sick with the scent is because there is something else wrong with us, or because the scent has something bad in it.



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 03:05 PM
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I'm going to chip in here being a clinical aromatherapist.
Sandalore is a manufacturedoil as noted in the quotes from the OP. It is not used in classical and traditional aromatherapy for that very reason.



Sandalwood oil from the East Indian sandalwood tree (Santalum album L.) has been used as a precious ingredient since the beginning of perfumery, and woody compounds reminiscent of sandalwood oil are heavily used in modern perfumery. In the 1970s sandalwood oil became scarce and expensive. Chemists in fragrance companies therefore put considerable efforts into synthesizing cheaper substitutes that have similar odor qualities. Sandalwood oil consists mainly of α- and β-santalol (~70%), which also give the oil its woody scent. Over the years, development of synthetic molecules as substitutes for sandalwood oil has led to a series of successful compounds, including the ones that have been used in this study (Sandalore®, Ebanol®, Radjanol® and Javanol®, all produced by Givaudan), all derived from α-campholenic aldehyde.


Sandalwood

Sandalwood has been recognised since Egyptian days for its skin healing ability. What these chemists have achieved is to show that their 'manufactured' Sandalore oil can do the same....I suspect Patent by pharmaceutical company's coming into play here.

Another interesting snippet for you.....Sandalwood will re-educate sperm to swim to the egg......but that's for an IVF topic.

Rainbows
Jane



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: angelchemuel


Wow thanks for posting that ..

Interesting history of sandalwood.

Makes me want to get all herbal and research more




posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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Conversely, I wonder what all the fake chemical frangrances do to us? Like in Febreeze, dryer sheets, detergents, etc...?



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 04:05 PM
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a reply to: kosmicjack

Exactly....personally I never use them ....barring washing powder or washing up liquid, which are always natural ingredients anyway.


Rainbows
Jane
edit on 12-7-2014 by angelchemuel because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 12 2014 @ 06:02 PM
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originally posted by: angelchemuel
a reply to: kosmicjack

Exactly....personally I never use them ....barring washing powder or washing up liquid, which are always natural ingredients anyway.


Rainbows
Jane


I don't even use those. Pretty much hot scalding water. The fragrances are just to get the body smell away...which the hot water does anyways.



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: angelchemuel
a reply to: kosmicjack

Exactly....personally I never use them ....barring washing powder or washing up liquid, which are always natural ingredients anyway.


Rainbows
Jane


I would think that we have gone backwards with hating our own natural odors also, using deodorant and stopping natural processes and bathing too often, mostly because corporations have made money from all of these things.



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