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WHY is the US Dept of State Interacting w/ISIS Fighters on Twitter?

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posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 12:00 PM
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I find it most interesting that the twitter post by the State Department is written using clear poetic alliteration.

The first line is hard consonants back to back. The second line focuses vowels and soft consonants.

This response is made by a professional writer. Probably a copy writer. Whether it be by trade or by talent, who knows.

The exclamation points seem odd to me as well. If these were followed by periods instead, the response would have seemed more authoritative. This particularly bothers me.

This tells me a few different possibilities. Either the one in charge of responding is involved with these somehow personally, or is highly patriotic and under stress, or the exclamation points are intended to vocalize as the voice of the many people as opposed to the voice of one. I believe it is a kind of combination of these things. Patriotic about what, I do not know. The response is clearly a voice of many people. And I believe there is a personal entanglement somewhere here for this to be possible.

I sought for a code, and if there be any code, it would be in the poetic writing itself and not in any numerical code, therefore, it would be substitution or implication and not mathematical in nature.

If there is a mathematical code, I believe you will find the key in ". Btw, Osama ", seeing as how Osama has, insofar as I am able to discern, little to do with the current group, unless the group has gone the way of P. Diddy and chosen to rename themselves so that they will be accessible another way; and though it is Twitter, it is unnecessary to say "By the way" with the statement that follows, except to add further strong language which is yet another sign of insecurity, except it be code.

But I doubt there is a distinguishable code.

I think the most likely scenario is that some kind of reporter is in charge of the social media aspect and is told to say, in whatever words they find most suitable, to express the voice of the leaders in the State Department. Simply enough, the reporter took poetic license, and the authority was slightly lost particularly because of the punctuation used.

Therefore, in this case, it is "WYSIWYG".




posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 12:20 PM
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"


"Like you haven't threatened us many times before! Btw, Osama officially retired from terrorism!"
a reply to: TarzanBeta



The first line is hard consonants back to back. The second line focuses vowels and soft consonants. This response is made by a professional writer. Probably a copy writer. Whether it be by trade or by talent, who knows.

For ease of reading.
Now I will read your post. It was so juicyy at the start, I had to post this before I finished. @TarzanBeta

Edit: I'm not picking up what your putting down. Is "T" a soft consonant? Are we talking about the same Tweet? Would a professional copywriter or poet find utility from "BTW"?


edit on 14-7-2014 by kkrattiger because: (no reason given)


Ahh, "BTW'" addressed.
NICE EF IN POST, Tarzan amigo. Thank you very much for the contribution. Please visit one or another pf my other threads to post there as well, if one strikes your style of analysis.
edit on 14-7-2014 by kkrattiger because: (no reason given)


It seems like within the 140-character limit, the writer of the Tweet could not fit in a more appropriate segue to reminded readers that Osama was put down (eventually) by the U.S., and chose btw rather than compose two tweets. Because the 2nd sentence needs a (what's the part of speech? Means linking word else it's got no flow.
edit on 14-7-2014 by kkrattiger because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 12:30 PM
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originally posted by: kkrattiger
"


"Like you haven't threatened us many times before! Btw, Osama officially retired from terrorism!"
a reply to: TarzanBeta



The first line is hard consonants back to back. The second line focuses vowels and soft consonants. This response is made by a professional writer. Probably a copy writer. Whether it be by trade or by talent, who knows.

For ease of reading.
Now I will read your post. It was so juicyy at the start, I had to post this before I finished. @TarzanBeta

Edit: I'm not picking up what your putting down. Is "T" a soft consonant? Are we talking about the same Tweet? Would a professional copywriter or poet find utility from "BTW"?



Meter the lines.

Like you haven't | threatened us many | ti-mes be fore |
By the way | Osama officiall- | y retired from | terrorism |

(edit to add: The second line could be metered alternately here: By the way | Osama officiall- | y retired | from terrorism |)

This is made by a professional.

T is androgynous. It can soften some phrases and harden some phrases. When "t" comes after certain letters, like the letter "m" in the last line, the hardness brought it only accents the softness of the phrase, like salt enhances sugar.

In the first line, the first three words set the mood for the rest of the words. Start hard, the rest flows hard. By the way switches from hard to soft. The alliteration of the "r" sounds in the second line create a windmill or a fan effect.

Some people do not have to sit down and actually plot it out. Some people are used to speaking poetically, so that the words they choose and how they put things together naturally flows in this way.

But I know that this is a professional writer. Whether by trade or by talent, who knows.

edit on 7/14/2014 by TarzanBeta because: Mo' Info


Edit to add again: It just dawned on me that if there was a mathematical code, it might possibility be found in the metering of phrases as well.
edit on 7/14/2014 by TarzanBeta because: Mo' Mo'.


That is correct. Valid point. The writer of the Tweet does seem to be addressing the audience more so than the enemy.


Here is a list of terms of poetry terms which will help you understand how many were used in those lines.

Alliteration, Assonance, Allusion, Common Meter, Neutral Diction, Foot (the current in question being trimeter), Litotes (understatement), Iambic Pentameter (most common in English, elevation speech to poetry) (the meters are being used alternatively), Image, Metaphor (but not the first line), Slant rhyme, Simile (with inference in the second line in the form of indirect metaphor)

Quick source of the search: Poetry Terms


edit on 7/14/2014 by TarzanBeta because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 12:37 PM
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I see what you mean with "T" : "from terrorism" certainly does have a softness.
As I was reading, thinking "but could someone baturally write this way"
Ahh, addressed in the next paragraph. Again, fantastic contribution; I appreciate your insight.
a reply to: TarzanBeta


edit on 14-7-2014 by kkrattiger because: BATURALLY. Why not

Please see edited post above your second-to-last post.
edit on 14-7-2014 by kkrattiger because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2014 @ 12:55 PM
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a reply to: kkrattiger

I started copying you and continually editing my response to you as a response.

It's kinda fun doing that actually.



posted on Jul, 15 2014 @ 09:58 AM
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Sorry. I guess I should have just done another reply. a reply to: TarzanBeta




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