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Ebola Update: Ten New Cases Confirmed & More Suspected - "The epidemic is out of control"

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posted on Jun, 26 2014 @ 04:44 PM
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a reply to: ketsuko

I thank you for sharing that information Ketsuko


Even though it was second hand, you heard it first hand from someone who knows what they're talking about so it's still appreciated. What you mentioned certainly makes sense, but as you have pointed out it's rather complicated with multiple variables at play so from what I can tell pretty much anything can happen depending which stimuli we're working with.

I don't want to sound demanding, but it would be great if your husband could stop by and share his thoughts on this and the different possibilities (hypothetically) if it's not too much trouble - if not I understand




posted on Jun, 26 2014 @ 04:50 PM
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originally posted by: TonyS
a reply to: Corruption Exposed

It isn't airborne; it's spread by contact with fluids, typically blood and diarrhea. So this arSticle is a bit misleading

Arse Tickle??....Explain..



posted on Jun, 26 2014 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol

LOL forgive me for pointing out the obvious, but it appears to be a spelling mistake.
( something tells me you already knew that
)

Good one though...I got a chuckle out of it.



posted on Jun, 26 2014 @ 07:42 PM
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a reply to: AnIntellectualRedneck




From my understanding, the reason that they are freaking out so much about this is that the ability of the virus to mutate into something more easily transmitted grows with every new human case that occurs. There was a case of it going airborne in a test lab between monkeys, if I remember correctly.


The airborne mutation happened here in the US of all places. (I think this was the first airborne case in monkeys). Reston, VA back in 1990. It doesn't affect humans however, even though humans have contracted the strain below. (asymptomatic)

en.wikipedia.org...


Reston virus (abbreviated RESTV) was first described in 1990 as a new "strain" of Ebola virus (EBOV), a result of mutation from Ebola virus.[1] It is the single member of the species Reston ebolavirus, which is included into the genus Ebolavirus, family Filoviridae, order Mononegavirales.[2] Reston virus is named after Reston, Virginia, US, where the virus was first discovered.



RESTV was discovered in crab-eating macaques from Hazleton Laboratories (now Covance) in 1989. This attracted significant media attention due to the proximity of Reston to the Washington, DC metro area, and the lethality of a closely related Ebola virus. Despite its status as a level-4 organism, Reston virus is non-pathogenic to humans, though hazardous to monkeys;[3][4] the perception of its lethality was confounded due to the monkey's coinfection with Simian hemorrhagic fever virus (SHFV).[5]


And the most recent Reston Ebola virus case was a few years ago, with pigs.


On 11 December 2008, pigs from farms slightly north of Manila, Philippines tested positive for the virus. The CDC and the World Health Organization are investigating.[18] On 23 January 2009, Philippine health officials announced that a hog farm worker had been infected with the virus. Although the man was asymptomatic and the source of the infection is uncertain, this could represent the first case of pig-to-human transmission of Reston virus - a fact that could cause concern, as pigs may be able to transmit more deadly diseases to humans. The situation is undergoing further investigation


ETA - A more recent study on pigs and monkeys summary

en.wikipedia.org...


In late 2012, Canadian scientists discovered that the deadliest form of the virus could be transmitted by air between species.[138] They managed to prove that the virus was transmitted from pigs to monkeys without any direct contact between them, leading to fears that airborne transmission could be contributing to the wider spread of the disease in parts of Africa. Evidence was also found that pigs might be one of the reservoir hosts for the virus; the fruit bat has long been considered as the reservoir.[138]

edit on 26-6-2014 by buni11687 because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-6-2014 by buni11687 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 02:51 AM
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An Ebola Pandemic (If mutated to an airborne strain) would be the worst of the worst man has ever seen in my opinion.

It's the scariest "Virus" ever.

What I am scratching my head about though is what constitutes it being an airborne virus as opposed to not being an airborne virus?

This virus is only spread through the contact of bodily fluids from the infected person, but let's say that person sneezed in a room of people; then those fluids are going to come into contact with and infect a few other people; correct?

That to me is airborne.

So where or when is the distinction made?

Thanks,

Chip



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 02:54 AM
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a reply to: Soloprotocol



Arse Tickle??....Explain..


That's when someone puts their sausage on someone else's buns.

Buy your own damn baps!!!


edit on 27-6-2014 by Chipkin9 because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-6-2014 by Chipkin9 because: (no reason given)

edit on 27-6-2014 by Chipkin9 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 08:10 AM
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a reply to: Chipkin9

Another great point


Sure, it's not officially "airborne" but ABOUT when someone sneezes or spits while they speak?

I know that Ebola is known to be have a shorter life but it's still contagious.

Ebola outbreaks are a silly thing to downplay in my opinion.

Cheers.



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 10:07 AM
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a reply to: Corruption Exposed

I believe that from what I've read the virus can't survive in the "open" air; hence, that's why it isn't "airborne". It would have to mutate to develop a "skin" to protect it from the outside air in order to survive.



posted on Jun, 27 2014 @ 10:16 AM
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a reply to: TonyS

What would you consider to be open air?

If I were to hug the body of a relative who died of Ebola, and expose myself to any bodily fluids which were on that body, those fluids would have been exposed to the open air. So long story short, it can survive in open air, there is no doubt about that - it cannot be denied.

As others have mentioned, its "shelf life" on surfaces which would count as "open air" is not very long at this point so the threat of "open air" exposure may be exaggerated, but it's certainly there.

I don't see what the difference is in regards to sneezing in one's face versus shaking someone's hand that had saliva on it then rubbing my eye. These are all "open air" scenarios have proven to be true.

So in conclusion, even though Ebola is not considered to be "airborne" it can be transferred via open air in multiple ways, some more easily than others.

I hope this made sense since I'm multi-tasking as I type this and am kind of all over the place.

Cheers.



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