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Veteran sneaks to D-day landing service

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posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 11:38 AM
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This gave me a giggle when I read it hope it does to you

A 89 year old D-day vet, who was banned by his nursing home from attending ceremonie, is found in Normandy

bbc.in...




posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: Thefarmer

Kick ass he's as cool now as he was then!




posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 12:01 PM
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Cool


What gives them the right to tell him he couldn't go!?



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 12:07 PM
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originally posted by: VoidHawk
Cool


What gives them the right to tell him he couldn't go!?


No doubt the health 'n' safety brigade... nobody was telling him it was unsafe to go 70 years ago though



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 12:22 PM
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a reply to: Thefarmer

Brilliant


He's got more about him than most of teenagers today.........................Go Grandad, I can only hope that I have his balls when I reach his age.

Excellent find and thanks for posing it farmer S&F

Cody



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 01:25 PM
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a reply to: Thefarmer

I am not laughing, but I am smiling.

Jolly good show that man!



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 02:28 PM
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a reply to: Rob48

Was exactly my 1st thought

Glad you all liked it




posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 02:52 PM
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Obviously he fought for his freedoms, and no nursing home/senior care facility is going to deny him those freedoms which he earned.



posted on Jun, 6 2014 @ 03:25 PM
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There is a line from Michener's "Tales of the South Pacific" that says "They, like their victories, will be remembered as long as our generation lives. After that, like the men of the Confederacy, they will become strangers. Longer and longer shadows will obscure them, until their Guadalcanal sounds distant on the ear, like Shiloh and Valley Forge."

That passage has always stuck with me because it is true. Later and later generations do not appreciate just what the older generations had to endure, and this is sad. Especially when we are talking about things so grand. WWII crawls further and further into history. There will always be those who understand and appreciate what these people endured, but they get fewer and fewer by the year. I would imagine that to truly appreciate it you would have to have been there, and there comes a point when all one has for understanding is what was recorded in one manner or another.

Perhaps more modern occurrences will be better documented and will allow future generations to get a better sense of what was going on, but there is a plethora of WWII footage in general, yet one still cannot get a true sense of just what the individuals had to go through by watching film alone. Even reading accounts is not enough. I suppose that is just a natural thing, but it is still sad.





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