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Dell Charger light going out, but still charges.

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posted on May, 24 2014 @ 02:03 PM
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I have had this charger for a year now, and for the last few days the blue light on it has gotten dimmer and dimmer until now it has no light, but it is still charging properly. Is this just a flaw in the LED or is my charger about to take a dump (again!). Thanks
Firepiston




posted on May, 24 2014 @ 02:05 PM
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a reply to: FirePiston

Dell Charging bricks are notorious for running about before their 18 month expected life cycles.

The usual cause is over charging along with heating issues.

Luckily they are cheap online for most dell models. I'd just spend the 50$ and cut your losses. Bad chargers can effect batteries.

~Tenth



posted on May, 24 2014 @ 02:11 PM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
a reply to: FirePiston

Dell Charging bricks are notorious for running about before their 18 month expected life cycles.

The usual cause is over charging along with heating issues.

Luckily they are cheap online for most dell models. I'd just spend the 50$ and cut your losses. Bad chargers can effect batteries.

~Tenth


My first one lasted about 4 years, plugged in 24/7.. I don't use the battery anymore because it wont hold a charge longer than 20-30 minutes. I will not get a new one until this dies.
Firepiston



posted on May, 24 2014 @ 02:16 PM
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a reply to: FirePiston

Oh, than that's your problem. If you are using a pooched battery pack with a OK charger, it's eating the power draw 24/7.

~Tenth



posted on May, 24 2014 @ 02:25 PM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
a reply to: FirePiston

Oh, than that's your problem. If you are using a pooched battery pack with a OK charger, it's eating the power draw 24/7.

~Tenth


Well the battery is fully charged, what I meant is that I do not use the battery without it being plugged in. The battery is still in the laptop.
Firepiston
edit on 24-5-2014 by FirePiston because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2014 @ 02:29 PM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
a reply to: FirePiston

Oh, than that's your problem. If you are using a pooched battery pack with a OK charger, it's eating the power draw 24/7.

~Tenth


Thats possible, but very unlikely. Batteries nearly always develop a high resistance and that leads to a higher voltage reading which causes the (internal to laptop) charge controller to stop charging the battery much sooner, hence why op's battery only lasts a few minutes.

OP. If the charger is still working, then its most likely the LED (or its supply) thats faulty. Personaly I'd keep using it, JUST DONT LEAVE IT ON WHEN YOUR NOT AT HOME!



posted on May, 24 2014 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

Only if your battery that's hooked into your machine is working properly.

Old and malfunctioning ones can cause all kinds of trips on your MOBO that govern power.

~Tenth



posted on May, 24 2014 @ 02:53 PM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower
Old and malfunctioning ones can cause all kinds of trips on your MOBO that govern power.
~Tenth

A battery might output voltage drops (not harmful) or completely fail, but very unlikely to cause damage, unless it caught fire! But op said he leaves the psu permanently connected, and that, along with the laptops micro-controller would maintain a steady voltage.

Laptops are not like a PC, a PC has supply rails of 3v5 5v and 12v and all have to remain very close to there rated output, but laptops separate out the individual voltages on the mobo, the input voltage can vary quite a lot before the laptop is affected. I have an old laptop that had a 19v psu, and it now runs of a 12v supply via and old PC psu



posted on May, 24 2014 @ 03:30 PM
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a reply to: VoidHawk

Aww void, come on though, you have to admit htat the following:


But op said he leaves the psu permanently connected, and that, along with the laptops micro-controller would maintain a steady voltage.


If not working properly could cause issues. Mind you how many Dell's have you repaired with similar problems cause the boards are paper thin?!

LOL

I know what you're saying though, I just have the identical problem with a current XPS Laptop from 2007.

I just keep buying the chargers after they crap out. I"m on the 4th one. Replaced the battery twice before I just said screw it.

I'd rather spend money on my desktop that has all my bells and whistles lol

~Tenth



posted on May, 24 2014 @ 04:17 PM
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Thanks for all of the replies. I will just keep using it until it fails to provide power. Also, does unplugging and plugging in my charger over and over from the wall outlet have any negative effect on it? With the surge of power going in it each time as opposed to leaving it plugged in all the time?
Firepiston
edit on 24-5-2014 by FirePiston because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2014 @ 06:22 PM
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a reply to: FirePiston

on the charger end, no because your brick most likely has a surge protector on it for that purpose.

~Tenth



posted on May, 25 2014 @ 09:04 AM
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originally posted by: FirePiston
Thanks for all of the replies. I will just keep using it until it fails to provide power. Also, does unplugging and plugging in my charger over and over from the wall outlet have any negative effect on it? With the surge of power going in it each time as opposed to leaving it plugged in all the time?
Firepiston


There isn't much inside it to create a surge. Most surge problems are cause by other devices! Lets say you you are using your vacuum cleaner, if you unplug it directly from the wall WHILE ITS RUNNING, it can send a huge voltage spike through the house wiring, that spike (surge) will find its way into anything thats plugged into the wall. Not so many years ago a large percentage of television breakdowns were caused by such actions as they had little protection against it.

Spikes (surges) are mostly caused by inductive appliances ie; appliances with electric motors. This happens because the field that develops around the windings will suddenly collapse when the supply is removed, that collapse sends out a voltage spike. Thats partly why you'll see a flash when you unplug such a device while its running.
Its that field collapse that creates the spark for the spark plugs of your car. Ever notice that the spark is created when the points OPEN!



posted on May, 25 2014 @ 09:32 AM
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originally posted by: tothetenthpower

I just keep buying the chargers after they crap out. I"m on the 4th one. Replaced the battery twice before I just said screw it.

~Tenth


Hi ~Tenth.
If your on your 4th one then that suggests a problem.
See my post above, then read the following...

Got any teenagers using hair driers who pull the plug while the drier is running?
A cheap, or not well made psu, may not have adequate protection. PSU's (bricks) use switched mode circuits, they contain chips and transistors that will go short circuit when hit with a large spike. A more expensive unit will have better protection, but the cheaper devices may not.

Due to copper prices, the protection components can often be the most expensive part of a psu, thats why cheap manufacturers often skimp on them. Chips are cheap, copper isn't.




edit on 25-5-2014 by VoidHawk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2014 @ 10:47 AM
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Thanks again all for the help! And the charger is still working fine minus the blue led light.

Firepiston



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