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JAMA - 1/2 of People Believe in Medical Conspiracy Theories

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posted on May, 20 2014 @ 09:41 AM
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Strange stuff. We can only see the first page of JAMA article but I have to say that, what we can see, is a conspiracy in of itself. First it says that half the people surveyed believe in at least one medical conspiracy theory. Then it goes on to slam those who believe in them as not taking care of themselves medically. The interviews with the author tell us what the next page of the study said ... he thinks those who believe in medical conspiracy theories are all delusional and uneducated and can't grasp hard science. (the dude got it backwards ... it's the science that is showing that some the medical conspiracy theories are probably facts and not theories at all)

Medical Conspiracy Theories and Health Behaviors in the United States


Conspiracy theories about cancer cures, vaccines and cell phones are familiar to at least half the sample. Those theories also enjoy relatively large levels of support: 37% of the sample agreed that the Food and Drug Administration is intentionally suppressing natural cures for cancer because of drug company pressure; 20% agreed that corporations were preventing public health officials from releasing data linking cell phones to cancer or that physicians still want to vaccinate children even though they know the vaccines are dangerous. Conspiracy theories about water fluoridation, genetically modified foods, and the link between human immunodeficiency virus and the US Central Intelligence Agency are less well known: less than one third of the sample said they had heard of these conspiracy narratives and only 12% of respondents agreed with each.

In sum, 49% of Americans agree with at least 1 medical conspiracy theory and 18% agree with 3 or more. These percentages are largely consistent with those found by surveys about political conspiracy theories.


So that all sounds really interesting, right? Large numbers of people are paying attention and are noticing things that aren't exactly on the up and up with things in the medical world. But then the article goes on to say that those who believe there are medical conspiracies also .... are you ready for this? .... don't use sun screen; don't get flu shots; don't get annual check ups; have paranoia and social estrangement ... all supposedly negative things and are supposedly 'red flags' to 'normal' people.

This is just page one of the article. You have to be a full subscriber to see the rest. I'm not one. I don't know if anyone here is. If so ... please let us know exactly what psychopathological condition they think we all have.

And the author of the article says those of us who believe in any of the medical conspiracies 'don't have a lot of education' ....
From Reuters which had the whole article

Instead of viewing patients who believe in conspiracy theories as crazy, he said doctors should realize those patients may be less likely to follow a prescription regimen.

"It's important to increase information about health and science to the public," he said. "I think scientific thinking is not a very intuitive way to see the world. For people who don't have a lot of education, it's relatively easy to reject the scientific way of thinking about things."


They summarized the rest as the JAMA saying that ... yes they think conspiracy people are crazy but don't bother giving them a prescription drug for it because they wont take it ... because those conspiracy people are uneducated and unscientific'. - at least that's what I'm getting out of the Reuters summation.

Wall Street Cheat Sheet Summation of the JAMA Article

Oliver’s study that was published Monday wasn’t interested in supporting or debunking the medical conspiracy theories in question. Rather, the University of Chicago professor was looking to ascertain whether there was a correlation between those who believe in the theories, and those who practice certain health behaviors. Oliver was able to highlight a significant association, and that was clear in his report Monday


This title will tick people off. Apparently if you believe in any medical conspiracy theory then you have a hard time believing 'hard science'. This yutz gets it backwards.
Medical Daily - Medical Conspiracy Theories Believed By Half The Country, Underscoring People’s Frustration With Hard Science

Conspiracy theories aren’t just fanciful ideas; they approach delusion, argues study leader Dr. J. Eric Oliver, who researches political psychology and public opinion at Chicago. According to Oliver, when people believe in conspiracy theories they demonstrate a fundamental unwillingness to accept scientific reason. The ideas are challenging to them, so they bristle — eventually forming conclusions just for the sake of knowing something.

"Science in general — medicine in particular — is complicated and cognitively challenging because you have to carry around a lot of uncertainty," Oliver told Reuters. "To talk about epidemiology and probability theories is difficult to understand as opposed to 'if you put this substance in your body, it's going to be bad.’”



edit on 5/20/2014 by FlyersFan because: spelling




posted on May, 20 2014 @ 09:45 AM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

The pharmaceutical industry is one huge conspiracy all in itself.

The corporations and politicians "do what they gotta do" when it comes to making sure their pockets stay fat regardless of the cost (both health-wise and financially to many unsuspecting consumers).

It would be foolish to not believe in medical conspiracies.

First learn the meaning of conspiracy (part of it means to conspire) and it will be clear that the whole medical industry is one big circular money generator for those who are lucky enough to be part of the "in crowd".
edit on 5/20/2014 by Corruption Exposed because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 09:52 AM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

The last time I went for my "yearly check up" I casually mentioned stress from work and without actually looking into the issue my doctor wrote me a prescription for an SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor) which is known to cause depression and even suicide among the countless other side effects. I laughed at her and told her she is being pimped by big pharma, walked out of her office and changed doctors.

I never ever get any shots (minus the ones I was forced to get as a child) and never ever get sick minus my year round allergies that did not begin until I moved to the USA and started taking your vaccines, coincidence?

If am to be considered as a nutter (one of the two who believes that medical conspiracies exist) then I proudly wear that badge as I am certain that there is even a eugenics program in full effect coming from the higher levels and the medical industry is a major part of this.

These theories of conspiracy did not pop out of thin air...just saying.
edit on 5/20/2014 by Corruption Exposed because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 09:53 AM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

News flash: Science done in the pursuit of profit is usually slanted or an outright lie.

The sharing of information is clearly reducing the profits for pharma.

It must therefore be stopped. Must lobby harder and spend even more on PR and marketing.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 10:04 AM
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The Medical Industrial Complex has been busted cold enough times to warrant suspicion of anything they tell us. Of course the author vilifies conspiracy believers. They're blowing his cover. My favorite is seeing a large colorful commercial for a medicine and then in the same program break, an ad for attorneys suing the makers of that same medicine due to the damage and deaths it has caused.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 10:23 AM
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originally posted by: Urantia1111
The Medical Industrial Complex has been busted cold enough times to warrant suspicion of anything they tell us. Of course the author vilifies conspiracy believers. They're blowing his cover. My favorite is seeing a large colorful commercial for a medicine and then in the same program break, an ad for attorneys suing the makers of that same medicine due to the damage and deaths it has caused.


I think your on to something!


A revolving door of money! Unfortunately, those whom do get ill from these so called "wonders of science" and win a law suit, usually end up with a vastly reduced life AND quality of life! So what good is the money they win?

Does anyone from the DRUG CORPORATION ever go to prison? NOPE! They just pay a fine and continue raking in the cash!



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 10:38 AM
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Does anyone from the DRUG CORPORATION ever go to prison? NOPE! They just pay a fine and continue raking in the cash - See more at: www.abovetopsecret.com...
a reply to: seeker1963

In the case of vaccines it's worse than that. The corporations are indemnified in the US. No criminal charges, no fines, gag orders come with the damage settlements from the USG settlement fund and thus, no harm to the bottom line.

Another example of total corporate ownership of the US.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 10:43 AM
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The main conspiracy these all have in common is "making the public dependent on the government" The government works with big business to make this happen. This actually is not a conspiracy at all though, it is a known practice of most governments. It only requires having paid attention to the subject when you were in school, the teachers used to tell everyone this, but it was not written in the books. It also was not addressed on any tests. Just because it was not in writing does not mean it is not true. We were told, but we did not listen.

Medicine is part of this dependence, also making us feel that only food that is deemed safe by the government is safe to consume. The chemicals used to preserve food are often touted as safe. Look at the big antioxidants are good for you scam. To a certain point they are. The main reason they have told us they are good is not for our health. It is because they are used extensively in our food system to keep foods from wilting and extend the breakdown of the foods. It is a scam. Fresh food is good for us, not food treated with antioxidants to keep them looking like they have just been picked. Oxidation is how we get energy, by making the food so it doesn't oxidize, all we do is increase our toilet paper use. Antioxidants are also immune system suppressants many time, the proper consumption of them can help us yet too much is not good. Cells need to die when they mutate or get damaged, constant over-consumption of this chemistry can cause cancer to take off.

Now the fact that the FDA is for big agra is not a conspiracy, it is a fact. The devil would have you believe a lie, the devil is not a real entity, it is an old word for deceit. The practices of the trickster. The slyness of the fox. The elements of the crow. Notice that these are properties of the scavengers, the animals that eat aged foods that build their intellect.
edit on 20-5-2014 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 10:52 AM
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The thing that is really irksome in this article ... the attitude of the guy who did the study. Anyone who disagrees with him isn't intelligent .. or can't handle hard science .. or is uneducated ... or is paranoid to the point of a mental disorder. I'd like to know where the guy gets his funding ... and i'd like to know how he can be so blind.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 10:56 AM
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originally posted by: FlyersFan
The thing that is really irksome in this article ... the attitude of the guy who did the study. Anyone who disagrees with him isn't intelligent .. or can't handle hard science .. or is uneducated ... or is paranoid to the point of a mental disorder. I'd like to know where the guy gets his funding ... and i'd like to know how he can be so blind.


Sounds like he is using Saul Alinsky tactics......"Rules for Radicals".

Seems to me that a certain group of people are relying very heavily on silencing their opponents by calling them names! Sadly it appears to be working.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 11:28 AM
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When not one, but two doctors tell me I need to take blood pressure pills for the rest of my life and never once mention diet or exercise it makes me wonder whose side their on, mine or the pill companies.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 11:37 AM
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a reply to: korath

About a year ago I got fed up with my doctor and switched. She was pushing cholesterol meds on both my husband and myself. We had been saying 'no' all the time. She was getting pushy. We finally left. Our new doctor says there is no need. Even if he said there was one I'd still make that decision myself. The cholesterol 'threshold' number is arbitrary anyways.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 11:41 AM
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a reply to: FlyersFan
Hey, how about that.
You got a second opinion. You did it right.
Not much of conspiracy if you got such a different opinion on your first try.



edit on 5/20/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

Make us fear cholesterol so we take the pill that can cause us to be dopey. Seems rational. Our brain is made of cholesterol, it is in the highest concentration there. If we reduce cholesterol, it takes from the place with the highest concentrations first. Think about that.

They should be trying to figure out why the cholesterol is not being broke down and excreted or reused instead of trying to treat the symptoms. Something is causing our bodies to not work right. Their answer is to dumb us down or weaken us so it boosts the control over us. No conspiracy here, just same ol same ol.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: rickymouse
Everyone I know who has gotten on those stupid cholesterol pills has had problems. They have gotten 'fuzzy brains' or they have had severe leg cramps or bad liver numbers in their blood work. Every last one.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 11:53 AM
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a reply to: FlyersFan

The evidence does not adequately prove they even work properly. They may lower cholesterol levels but at what expense. They have a new test out for about a hundred bucks that can check the condition of your blood vessel calcium buildup which can help assess risk. Half the people on statins do not need to be on Statins.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 02:59 PM
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originally posted by: Phage
a reply to: FlyersFan
Hey, how about that.
You got a second opinion. You did it right.
Not much of conspiracy if you got such a different opinion on your first try.


Oh, there's most definitely 'conspiracies' in the medical industry. The 180 degree second opinion was because she found a doctor who thought for themselves, which was actually pretty rare until recently. The new breed of docs sometimes gets on the internet and looks at the different information coming out, too. Unfortunately, you have no way of knowing if you have a thoughtful enlightened doc or one of the bought-and-paid-for pharmaceutical shills until you waste your time on the latter, usually when you're sick and owe them a copay now anyway. It'd be nice if physicians would post their 'philosophy' on line so it'd be easier to get a bead on them before you walk in the door and waste everyone's time.

When's the last time you had a doc sit down and spend the time letting you know of the possible side effects of a drug they were putting you on, or did a proper physical exam which includes an EKG, carotid artery listen, hands-on abdominal exam, full blown lab work, and a real discussion of your medical and family history?

Never, I can easily presume. Why? Because the 15 minutes they schedule isn't enough time for any of that, and that's what U.S. medical care now consists of. It's a joke. You'll get better personalized attention at a car wash.

Source for my opinion? 40 years in the medical field watching it all, aghast.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 03:12 PM
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a reply to: signalfire



Never, I can easily presume.

Your presumption is incorrect.
But do you think an EKG is something that should be routinely done? Assuming that blood tests, pressure, and pulse indicate no abnormality? That would seem to me more a matter of just running up the bill.

edit on 5/20/2014 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 03:17 PM
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Part of the problem is actions like this by doctors who only think about personal gain rather than helping patients...

painmedicinenews.com...


Scott S. Reuben, MD, former chief of acute pain service at Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, Mass., and implicated in one of the largest cases of publishing fraud, has agreed to plead guilty to one charge of fraud in connection with falsifying and fabricating research studies involving Pfizer Inc.’s painkiller Celebrex.

In court documents released last month by the U.S. Attorney’s office in Boston, Dr. Reuben has agreed to pay nearly $362,000 in restitution to Pfizer, Merck & Co., and Wyeth/Rays of Hope and forfeit an additional $50,000. Although the charge to which he has agreed to plead guilty (health care fraud, 18 U.S.C. Section 1347) allows for a maximum sentence of 10 years in prison and twice the amount of restitution, prosecutors agreed to recommend a sentence “at the low end” of the guideline range followed by supervised release of two years, according to the plea agreement signed on Jan. 12. Dr. Reuben’s attorney will be permitted to seek an alternative form of sentence not involving prison when the case is brought before a judge.“Although the plea agreement has been filed, it has not been accepted by the Court,” said Christina DiIorio-Sterling, a spokeswoman for the U.S. Attorney’s office. “There has to be a plea hearing, and the judge needs to accept the plea for it to be binding,” she told Pain Medicine News.



www.nbcnews.com...


On the night of his 12th wedding anniversary, Dr. Andrew Friedman was terrified.

This brilliant surgeon and researcher at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School feared that he was about to lose everything — his career, his family, the life he’d built — because his boss was coming closer and closer to the truth:

For the past three years, Friedman had been faking — actually making up — data in some of the respected, peer-reviewed studies he had published in top medical journals.

“It is difficult for me to describe the degree of panic and irrational thought that I was going through,” he would later tell an inquiry panel at Harvard.


articles.mercola.com...


Dr. Mark Nesselson, a New York pediatrician who conspired with families to get their children into school without state-mandated vaccinations, has been fined $10,000 and told he can practice only under supervision. Dr. Nesselson admitted to falsifying forms for four children in two families, and later admitted that he had done the same for a handful of other families over the years.


healthland.time.com...


In January 2012, University of Connecticut officials announced that Das, director of the Cardiovascular Research Center, had fabricated his research 145 times in papers published in 11 scientific journals. Das studied the effects of a compound in red wine, resveratrol, on the heart.


And one of the worst...

www.cnn.com...


A now-retracted British study that linked autism to childhood vaccines was an "elaborate fraud" that has done long-lasting damage to public health, a leading medical publication reported Wednesda


There is enough evidence out there that some people in the medical field will do whatever it takes for money and/or fame and presitge.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: GAOTU789



There is enough evidence out there that some people in the medical field will do whatever it takes for money and/or fame and presitge.


People acting badly in their own interest is not a conspiracy though, is it?



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