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How could you sure the organic food you ate is real organic food?

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posted on May, 16 2014 @ 08:38 AM
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(Except you plant it yourself).
I heard about a locale "organic food" businessman said "I often selling fake organic vegetables as organic food,people can't distinguish them anyway "indirectly.Because real organic vegetables is very rare.
And the real organic vegetables IS REALLY HARD to producing.
(Personal experience,I planting some of them in a flowerpot )
I sure mass production of organic food is impossible .
If organic food is such easy to fake and with huge profit ,how could you sure the organic food you ate is real organic food?

I can't find purity in this world .




posted on May, 16 2014 @ 08:43 AM
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A thread by WolfSong13 shows a device that would very well do what your asking.

Molecular Sensor

You should check the thread out, and its already gotten over 1 million dollars in donor money.
!



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 08:44 AM
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I've often though this myself. The best way is to buy heirloom seeds online to plant yourself. However, how does one know that these seeds are 100% legitimate themselves? We have fruit trees that have been in the family for 20 plus years, now those things produce some good fruit, not sure about veggies though! Good luck on your quest! If I find the link to the site we used I'll post it for you.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 08:44 AM
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I ate organic from the store once, and it sucked, I will only eat my own organic



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 08:59 AM
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originally posted by: Stormdancer777
I ate organic from the store once, and it sucked, I will only eat my own organic

That was what I planned to say...
If you don't raise it yourself, you can't be sure that it is organic. Even if you live next to the farm that is selling it, you can't be sure what is going on or into it.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:09 AM
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originally posted by: Thisbseth
A thread by WolfSong13 shows a device that would very well do what your asking.

Molecular Sensor

You should check the thread out, and its already gotten over 1 million dollars in donor money.
!

Didn't open to use yet ,and It's cloud ,so it's easy to fake the result.


originally posted by: butcherguy
I ate organic from the store once, and it sucked, I will only eat my own organic
That was what I planned to say...
If you don't raise it yourself, you can't be sure that it is organic. Even if you live next to the farm that is selling it, you can't be sure what is going on or into it.


I read many people on planting forums recommended use DDT and roundup.
edit on 16-5-2014 by candlestick because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:16 AM
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a reply to: candlestick

I can test the difference with milk and some veg. I can see the difference with eggs.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:18 AM
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originally posted by: PhoenixOD
a reply to: candlestick

I can test the difference with milk and some veg. I can see the difference with eggs.


What?????????? you can taste it ?



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:22 AM
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We have chickens. I can tell the difference too. a reply to: PhoenixOD



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:26 AM
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originally posted by: candlestick

originally posted by: PhoenixOD
a reply to: candlestick

I can test the difference with milk and some veg. I can see the difference with eggs.


What?????????? you can taste it ?


Yeah , i was surprised as well. I think organic milk has the biggest difference in taste.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:27 AM
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I read that the milk you buy in stores is often already a month old. Have to find the source for that, don't quote me on it.a reply to: PhoenixOD

ETA: or maybe it was eggs?
edit on 16-5-2014 by denybedoomed because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 11:18 AM
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The standards change from state to state and there is no Federal set of conditions for using the marketing term 'organic' It even varies from farm to farm. Here there is no standard that applies to other states such as Kentucky. The large population of Mennonites and Amish farmers are allowed to use chemical as a last resort to losing a crop. A good example of that would be squash bugs that can devastate a crop ,large or small, in as little as 72 hours. It is counterproductive to let a whole crop rot in the field just to fall under the definition of marketing term.

Organic produce grown locally and sold in open air markets is definitely worth the price increase if you feel that those practices( widespread use of pesticides) are unhealthy on an individual basis. That, however, is not the case in large as studies to determine if organic production is better/worse take decades to complete and are practically impossible to be scientific simply because there are so many small farms-especially in the south. The government has never said, or can they say, that one is better than the other. It is a personal choice.

When it come to large supermarket chains-who import their produce in bulk at a lower price that can be charged in America-the term 'organic' mostly applies to the incredibly large farms in South America-some millions of acres in size-that practice farming techniques and standards set in the region. So, are these practices the same as say in South Carolina? No, they are not, however, again, that doesn't mean they have been sprayed with pesticides. I know that is confusing and it more than likely always be.

The biggest problem comes from middlemen ( peddlers, vendors or resellers) that put organic labels on produce just to create a higher profit margin. So you need to just use common sense when buying from them.

As far as Bovines are concerned the state requires certain chemicals that must be passed on to offspring and these are toxic substances above and beyond pesticides. For instance I must, by law, allow my nursing heifers mineral blocks that have anti-worm oxidants in them to be passed on to the calf and these are toxic to humans. This however has no effect on milk or meat production-again confusing-but that is just how it is.

It's best just to form a relationship with a local producer/farmer who will, almost always, tell you the truth about what they grow.
edit on 16-5-2014 by spooky24 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 12:00 PM
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Some items, you can tell by taste, as mentioned by previous posters. Fruit is an easy one. If it's a nice big, flawless looking strawberry (just an example) is simply isn't 100% "organic" as in pesticide and chemical free.

In reality, organic is organic regardless, but I digress.

Fun fact: IF you see a USDA label that reads 100% Organic on some sort of packaged item, do you know what that means? Let's say it's organic peanut butter. That USDA 100% Organic label actually means the item was made using at least 70% organic ingredients.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 12:02 PM
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Lately, I've been wondering the same thing as I slowly replace my house with organic products. What about items that are USDA certified organic (ex: oils, shea butter, cocoa butter, etc.)? Or are only fresh produce questionable?



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 12:21 PM
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a reply to: freetheuniverse

Certified organic means 90% free of non-organic pesticides, fertilizers, etc. I would bet with oils and butters there is more room for non-organic ingredients than fresh produce. Obtaining organic products you can believe in is probably best done at small farmer's markets and the like.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 12:56 PM
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a reply to: usernameconspiracy

Wow, I had no idea, thank you for bringing this to my attention! I have a Sprouts Farmer's Market really close to my house. Does anyone had any experience shopping with them? How are the quality of their products compared to other farmer's markets?
edit on 16-5-2014 by freetheuniverse because: typo



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 01:19 PM
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Well, commercial organic uses chemicals to extend the life of the food. These chemicals are just approved by the government as certified organic chemicals. It doesn't mean it is good for you. In fact, it may be worse than manmade chemicals to some people who have allergies to the chemical.

They still spray bug spray on their plants, but this spray is considered organic so it is allowed. Is it safer for us than non-organic? I doubt it.

The other practices of growing organic seem to increase the flavor of the veggies, not the certified organic part. If a plant has proper nutrition it will form it's own chemicals, these natural formed plant chemicals actually taste good to us because we have been eating them for thousands of years.

Why does cinnamon taste good. It does not taste good to many animals. Yet humans have been eating this chemistry for a long time, now some of us need it just to be normal. We evolved with our foods. Now we are messing with our foods. No wonder people are at more risk of getting diseases and so many people require meds. It is excessive change that is the problem when it happens too quickly. Most people cannot eat an Avacado yet and process it right without some side effects. My parents probably never touched an avacado before I was born. I've eaten it in small amounts about a dozen times. Yet they tell people we should all eat this....they must be trying to kill off all the trusting fools. Our bodies do not just automatically create the right enzymes. We have to evolve with it. We may luck out occasionally but maybe something different in the diet the next time will cause problems.

Now, people who have been eating avacados for a couple of generations can eat it, their ancestors paid the price of change.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: freetheuniverse

hey 90% is better than the USDA 100% Organic label. That means at least 70% organic....somehow! I think you are pretty safe at any farmer's market where only locally produced products are sold. That's as organic as you are likely to find outside of growing or making your own.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 03:04 PM
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a reply to: PhoenixOD

Yes, we have our own layers and the difference in the eggs is obvious. In color, taste and texture. The taste of milk peppers, tomatoes and potatoes is also very different when tasted side by side with conventional market varieties. A large part of that comes with refrigeration, shipping and storage practices that need to happen to support and supply larger market chains.

As another poster mentioned, building a relationship with small local farmers is an easy way to find out exactly whats going on behind the scenes and often times these small farmers are happy to let people come by and take a tour. The other thing I love about the smaller farm markets is that if you are in doubt about the taste most are very encouraging when it comes to asking questions and tasting what they have to offer right there.

Penny



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: freetheuniverse

It's my understanding that Sprouts Farmers market is the name of the market chain and not an actual farmers market. They do seem to offer a wide range of commercially available organic brands but they are still a fairly large commercial chain.

I'm not sure of your location but on the net you can usually find your local organic farmer association and listings of weekly markets in your area. If you would like to send me a u2u I would be happy to take a look.

Penny





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