The deadliest aircraft collision that never happened:

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posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:17 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Well... I'll leave the story here then and skip the updates. Sounds like it's not worth the hassle.

Have a good night...




posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:25 PM
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a reply to: Wrabbit2000

Not saying that AT ALL.

The FAA ATC system is forty years old. Even their updated system is starting to have problems. But there's nothing that can be done about it because year after year the FAA gets a continuing resolution, which won't pay for new toilets, let alone the new system desperately needed.

It just annoys me that instead of taking THAT from this situation, the media is running with what is essentially a hit piece on the airlines. If they were to focus on the RIGHT things (them not you), then maybe there would finally be some outrage and the FAA could get the money, and we could at LEAST replace the worst of the current system, if not something totally new.

Updates are not a bother or a waste of time by any means. Hell, maybe we can start spreading the word that the ATC system is falling apart.



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 08:46 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58
I've just seen the story that I think was the source of this thread. The problem with air traffic system is the spaces not covered by radar control. These area are areas between the US and Europe or around Hawaii where the radar is ineffective due to the earth's curvature or signal strength. Planes fly in these area by a procedure called "flight following." The pilots are required to report their position and altitude periodical to the flight following controller by radio. Even with this method, the radio communication is unreliable. The aircraft may change heading and altitude due to weather or winds while out of communication making collision possible with other crossing flights.

When aircraft near radar coverage, they are required to cross a fix where aircraft interface with arriving or departing flights. Radar controller then start to sort out the inbound traffic and provide separation. This is where TCAS is very important. This flight following system has been around since I've started flying in 1968 and has had good but imperfect results. Even in the radar environment (coverage) collision is possible when only one craft isn't following the rules.



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 10:04 AM
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a reply to: buddah6

Is TCAS and the MK1 eyeball the only systems to prevent mid-air collisions when out side of radio communications with the flight following controller?



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: Sammamishman
I stopped commercial flying in the early 1990's and the TCAS was only coming into service then. Before that it was just the Mk1 eyeball and accurate position reporting. Now there may be satellite communication but I'm not aware of it. You would trust that the other guy is following the rules too.



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 07:23 PM
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a reply to: Sammamishman

The ADS-B system will broadcast their position to other aircraft.



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 08:06 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58





I have yet to hear about a commercial pilot that hasn't called ATC on their mistakes, especially one this big.


Maybe this is your first time hearing it?
They always say there is a first time for everything.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 08:16 PM
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a reply to: Iwinder

Doubtful. Pilots always hit controllers that screw up, especially like this.



posted on May, 17 2014 @ 09:59 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

If I was a pilot I sure as hell would to make sure it doesn't happen again or at least start the conversation on how to avoid similar situations.



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 06:20 AM
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Kevin Townsend is an idiot, write up is just to get attention for himself. Since tcas has evolved to be extremely reliable the only exception is when pilots do not put their transponders on alt.

he's so wrong he claims the last fatality in commercial airlines was 2009, but even that is wrong as ups had a crash in 2013. there have been fatalities on planes that operate as commercial operators under the CFR who may just carry 2-3 people.

he doesn't have a clue what he's talking about, perhaps he should educate himself



posted on May, 18 2014 @ 07:10 AM
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Kevin is just trying to work his way into CNN. He realized their aviation expert was the person who did the travel segments and had flown on a 777. It sounds like he is ready to join and give us quality CNN reporting. After all in their reporting, information does not have to be factual, just believable



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 02:52 PM
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Another near miss at Newark

A Regional Jet and 737 passed within 135 x 50 yards of each other. One was cleared to land, while the other was cleared to take off on the crossing runway it looks like.



posted on May, 20 2014 @ 03:31 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Just saw it made the headlines on MSN:

news.msn.com...





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