The deadliest aircraft collision that never happened:

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posted on May, 15 2014 @ 10:23 PM
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Now this is one to make you go Hmmmmm?


Kevin Townsend was flying from Hawaii to Los Angeles when he says his plane almost collided with another.

He estimates that 590 could have died if the pilot hadn't veered out of the way of the on-coming jet, yet the near-miss hasn't made the news.


The number comes from the combined total and what makes it interesting is that Kevin Townsend is a writer. Oops...

I'm sure the airlines just grab for the TUMS when they hear a major screw up happened with either a member of Congress, celebrity or unfriendly Media/writers on-board.

Nothing like getting professional descriptions of fail from the inside.

This one is still something to raise questions in it's own right, IMO though. How close to have come? I mean, really. This should never happen, IMO, yet the data seems to support his account.


Shortly after reaching cruising altitude on April 25, the entire cabin of United Airlines flight 1205 went weightless as the pilot unexpectedly dipped 600 feet.

'I felt my body float upwards and strain against my seatbelt. Passengers around me screamed. There was a loud crash in the back — a coffeepot clattering to the floor and tumbling down the aisle,' Townsend wrote.
Source

This is definitely one I recommend reading the source article on as well as the graphics used there to illustrate what is meant by near miss and how it may have come about in this case.

There is also a good deal more at the end about why this may have failed to make major news before this.

It's downright disturbing is what I'd say about it.

What conspiracy theories would have come from those two aircraft, if they had experienced a Mid-Air collision somewhere out over the Pacific? All for what sounds like simple flaws within a system badly in need of attention. Attention in good faith, of course, not political self interest.




posted on May, 15 2014 @ 10:52 PM
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a reply to: Wrabbit2000
Like het comments on the story say - the story is a non-issue beatup by someone who doesn't know what he is talking about trying to make some sort of journalistic reputation for himself.

sure there would have been lots of conspiracies if 2 such a/c hit - which just shows how shallow the thinking of CT's is!



posted on May, 15 2014 @ 10:53 PM
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a reply to: Wrabbit2000


Gee...they said that everyone's in-flight entertainment would be comped for the flight
Oh goody[/sarcasm]

As opposed to what--the 'out-flight' entertainment being the near-hit for free????
Really???
That's the best that they could come up with?
How about the next 2 or 3 flights for free!!!

So basically, if it wasn't for this writer dude, we'd still be in the dark about it
Niiiiiicce



posted on May, 15 2014 @ 11:22 PM
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a reply to: Wrabbit2000

It would have been a cooler story had the pilot rolled the aircraft and pulled back hard on the yoke!!


Cool find, Wrabbit. Good/bad pics in your source. I never knew two jumbos had actually collided.



posted on May, 15 2014 @ 11:55 PM
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originally posted by: Snarl
a reply to: Wrabbit2000

It would have been a cooler story had the pilot rolled the aircraft and pulled back hard on the yoke!!


Cool find, Wrabbit. Good/bad pics in your source. I never knew two jumbos had actually collided.


Didn't this time, but two did in 1977.


The Tenerife airport disaster was a fatal collision between two Boeing 747 passenger aircraft which occurred on Sunday, March 27, 1977, on the runway of Los Rodeos Airport (now known as Tenerife North Airport), on the Spanish island of Tenerife, one of the Canary Islands.


Link

Cheers - Dave



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 12:00 AM
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originally posted by: bobs_uruncle

originally posted by: Snarl
a reply to: Wrabbit2000

It would have been a cooler story had the pilot rolled the aircraft and pulled back hard on the yoke!!


Cool find, Wrabbit. Good/bad pics in your source. I never knew two jumbos had actually collided.


Didn't this time, but two did in 1977.


The Tenerife airport disaster was a fatal collision between two Boeing 747 passenger aircraft which occurred on Sunday, March 27, 1977, on the runway of Los Rodeos Airport (now known as Tenerife North Airport), on the Spanish island of Tenerife, one of the Canary Islands.


Link

Cheers - Dave

Ah ... yes. A ground collision. The source article made it sound to me like a mid-air had happened.

Thanks for the reply. I would have wandered off thinking things wrong had you not!!

-Cheers



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 01:36 AM
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Um, more than not it was turbulence in my opinion. I've dropped several thousand feet in seconds on a tanker before and you certainly don't go weightless just dropping six hundred feet.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 01:55 AM
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a reply to: boomer135

I've dropped several thousand feet in seconds on a tanker before

What's that like? My guess is, with your job, your 'frequent flyer miles' are off the charts. With what frequency have you experienced significant altitude loss?

I've been on lots of transcontinental flights and experienced one or two flight plan deviations to avoid bad air. I doubt you have that luxury. LOL

I was on a MAC flight once with no one in front. We hit an air pocket and dropped so fast my head hit the ceiling hard enough to make my neck hurt. Woo-hoo!! Now the lady that was seated in the middle row with her kid didn't feel that way, but my laughter put a quick check on a feeling of terror setting in. We all kept our seat belts fastened after that ... without having to be told even!!

Life is good.

-Cheers



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 02:34 AM
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originally posted by: Snarl
a reply to: boomer135

I've dropped several thousand feet in seconds on a tanker before

What's that like? My guess is, with your job, your 'frequent flyer miles' are off the charts. With what frequency have you experienced significant altitude loss?

I've been on lots of transcontinental flights and experienced one or two flight plan deviations to avoid bad air. I doubt you have that luxury. LOL

I was on a MAC flight once with no one in front. We hit an air pocket and dropped so fast my head hit the ceiling hard enough to make my neck hurt. Woo-hoo!! Now the lady that was seated in the middle row with her kid didn't feel that way, but my laughter put a quick check on a feeling of terror setting in. We all kept our seat belts fastened after that ... without having to be told even!!

Life is good.

-Cheers


Just a few times. Six years of flying netted me over 2500 hours, almost a 1000 in combat time. But were just like any other airliner. We see turbulence we just climb or descent to avoid it. For a wild ride Google the vomit comet. Lol



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 03:35 AM
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The writer is an idiot who didn't know what he's talking about. These reports are filed with the FAA almost immediately. Most of the time as soon as they're in range of ATC they verbally tell them, then file a report when they land.

If it was a near miss, the system DID work. They didn't hit. It's that simple.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 05:40 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Not to mention when that plane got to altitude he was still in Hawaii radar most likely...



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 08:30 AM
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a reply to: boomer135

More than likely. He had to cross over to either Hilo or Maui coverage while climbing out if he departed from Kona heading East.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 08:41 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I normally agree with ya Zaph...but..


When an incident happens in the air outside of air traffic control, it's up to the pilot to report incident.

It wasn't until two weeks after the accident that the FAA finally found out about the incident and said it was being investigated, both internally by the airline and by the Air Traffic Organization.

However, an FAA inspector in Hawaii told Townsend that nothing was likely to come from the investigation because everything on the planes seemed to work properly.
(Op Link)

I'd recommended people read this one because there was A LOT more to it than what I could fit into 'fair use' quoting, even for a complete summary. He's got direct quotes from the flight deck crew and as noted there, reference to statements regarding the FAA's investigation into the incident.

I'm open to the idea of total fabrication. It happens...but that's what it would have to be, given how far beyond a simple first person 'because I said it was so' this goes for citing 3rd parties by title and specific situation references?
edit on 16-5-2014 by Wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: Wrabbit2000

Pilots almost always immediately report a near miss, especially one that close. You have four pilots involved, and for not one of them to bitch at the controller that screwed up would be nearly unprecedented. I have yet to hear about a commercial pilot that hasn't called ATC on their mistakes, especially one this big.

According to the FAA the initial investigation began right away. It took a couple weeks for them to arrive in Hawaii for that portion of the investigation.

This incident was thirty minutes after take off. They were still inside radar coverage when it happened, which means it was reported immediately when the ATC alarms went off.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:11 AM
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Wouldn't the collision avoidance system (TCAS?) have operated in this circumstance?

It's installed and active on all commercial carriers these days AFAIK



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58


This incident was thirty minutes after take off. They were still inside radar coverage when it happened, which means it was reported immediately when the ATC alarms went off.


Hmm... I'm just confused.. Are we assuming these things or do you have a source I don't? I mean I shared this because it seemed fairly complete and with references to specific people, places, times and events in all directions. Nothing vague, nothing left to guess and direct quotes from other people on-board the aircraft.

I may just call the FAA and ask on this, as I'm getting real real tired of Media just fabricating whole stories out of thin air, if that is what this is... I'm feeling real serious about nailing this one down, one way or the other though. It happened or it didn't, and there isn't much in between..

So.. Before I hop off and make phone calls to see how far 'just asking' really gets us these days? Save me the trouble if you have alternative ways to confirm or disprove some of this? (hopeful smile)



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:38 AM
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a reply to: Pilgrum

TCAS is what warned them to start with.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:39 AM
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a reply to: Wrabbit2000

That was from the Honolulu news reporting on the incident.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:41 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Thanks! I'll start there and get back on what I find...

If the story becomes about the media source making mountains out of mole hills to fabricate a whole thing like this, I'm good with that too. I've been kinda waiting for a dead bang example without wiggle room for just that sort of thing.



posted on May, 16 2014 @ 09:53 AM
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a reply to: Snarl
One 747 was on the ground and still on the runway after landing. The KLM 747 did not see the other 747 due low visibility on the end of airport and started it's takeoff roll without clearance due to the captain being in a hurry. The KLM jet only saw the other plane as it turn on to the taxiway and just as it became airborne. The KLM plane struck the taxiing 747 midship above the wings.





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