Honeybees abandoning hives and dying due to insecticide use, Harvard research finds

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posted on May, 10 2014 @ 08:19 AM
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a reply to: AlphaHawk

hmm..

Weather conditions that resulted in late planting when nearby canola crops were in bloom A particular type of air-driven equipment used to sow the seeds which apparently blew clothianidin-laden dust off the seeds and into the air as the seeds were ejected from the machine into the ground Dry and windy conditions at the time of planting that blew the dust into the nearby canola fields where honey bees were foraging

that process sounds REMARKABLY like what i was saying about those GM 'insecticides'
right down to the use of that grain type (as a general rule, unless otherwise stated it's fairly safe to assume GM, ditto soy afaic)

when some of these items decay (half lives etc) they tend to produce newer items that further decay.. when does this process eventually stop? and when does it become "safe"?

i think the analogy about responsibility & that gun-manufacturer becomes skewed, imho?
it would be more like;
farmer: "hey, why'd the damn thing up and die on me? ..i only wounded it!?"
the bullets have been laced with poison




posted on May, 10 2014 @ 08:49 AM
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a reply to: UNIT76

It's not skewed, the application of a product plays a HUGE part in this.

Ever maintained a pool?

One of the products used is hydrochloride acid, when you go for a swim and your eyes start stinging because too much hydrochloric acid was added to the water, do you blame the maker of the acid? Or the guy adding it?



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 11:21 AM
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originally posted by: UNIT76
a reply to: AlphaHawk

hmm..

Weather conditions that resulted in late planting when nearby canola crops were in bloom A particular type of air-driven equipment used to sow the seeds which apparently blew clothianidin-laden dust off the seeds and into the air as the seeds were ejected from the machine into the ground Dry and windy conditions at the time of planting that blew the dust into the nearby canola fields where honey bees were foraging

that process sounds REMARKABLY like what i was saying about those GM 'insecticides'
right down to the use of that grain type (as a general rule, unless otherwise stated it's fairly safe to assume GM, ditto soy afaic)

when some of these items decay (half lives etc) they tend to produce newer items that further decay.. when does this process eventually stop? and when does it become "safe"?

i think the analogy about responsibility & that gun-manufacturer becomes skewed, imho?
it would be more like;
farmer: "hey, why'd the damn thing up and die on me? ..i only wounded it!?"
the bullets have been laced with poison


That was known in the mid 1990's. The rural countryside section of "The Times" had a commentary by one of the farmers; "It's spring, the flowers are starting to bloom, the bright yellow fields of canola crops are visible from miles away, and the rich pungent smell of the oil makes the bees slow and dozy, crashing into windows and windscreens alike".



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 12:25 PM
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The Bees are integral, we should not let them perish!



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 12:43 PM
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a reply to: ChaoticOrder

Rational, thoughtful discussion which must carry to the Feds and the irrational system of Profits of destruction at any cost..



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 05:02 PM
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I don't really worry about too many things in life but this is one thing that turn this already goofy world totally upside down. Just a matter of time before we kill ourselves off due to our ignorance to nature.



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 08:13 PM
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originally posted by: stormcell

originally posted by: UNIT76

a reply to: AlphaHawk



hmm..


Weather conditions that resulted in late planting when nearby canola crops were in bloom A particular type of air-driven equipment used to sow the seeds which apparently blew clothianidin-laden dust off the seeds and into the air as the seeds were ejected from the machine into the ground Dry and windy conditions at the time of planting that blew the dust into the nearby canola fields where honey bees were foraging


that process sounds REMARKABLY like what i was saying about those GM 'insecticides'

right down to the use of that grain type (as a general rule, unless otherwise stated it's fairly safe to assume GM, ditto soy afaic)



when some of these items decay (half lives etc) they tend to produce newer items that further decay.. when does this process eventually stop? and when does it become "safe"?



i think the analogy about responsibility & that gun-manufacturer becomes skewed, imho?

it would be more like;

farmer: "hey, why'd the damn thing up and die on me? ..i only wounded it!?"

the bullets have been laced with poison




That was known in the mid 1990's. The rural countryside section of "The Times" had a commentary by one of the farmers; "It's spring, the flowers are starting to bloom, the bright yellow fields of canola crops are visible from miles away, and the rich pungent smell of the oil makes the bees slow and dozy, crashing into windows and windscreens alike".








I did a search for your quote. Couldn't find it.



posted on May, 10 2014 @ 10:56 PM
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Get back to the cause, the instigation of short term control in the pursuit of profits regardless of the long term consequences. You leverage for short term gain and get out before the long term risk occurs.



posted on May, 11 2014 @ 06:43 AM
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As a bicyclist I can tell you I've seen both wasp and honey bees lying dead on the street. So whatever is killing these insects, it is very disturbing to see so many. I'd like to point out that the time of such sightings are in June and July , which are very hot with the Asian sun beaming down. Also honey in this country cost about $35 for about a pint. We can buy Chinese honey which if you want to live, you don't buy, at about $3 for a quart. I know it is mixed and most people will agree, and why it is allowed to be imported into this country is a crime.



posted on May, 11 2014 @ 06:34 PM
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Losing the Honey Bees is a very serious matter. I just recently got my first hive, it's very enjoyable. Plus I'm helping my garden......a reply to: R_Clark




posted on May, 12 2014 @ 04:21 AM
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Oh no! Not the bees again!

I don't condone the use of chemicals, especially with unknown long term ecological effects.

However, every time the "bees are dying" threads pop up, the awareness is minimal that they are talking about the domestic honey bee. They don't know about the native honey bees or other pollenators because there is no research on it.

They do know about the domestic honey bees dying because these colonies are stressed out traveling around the USA and other nations to various farms and then forced to harvest different monocultured crops without a choice.

Monoculture is not good, the green revolution seems more like a death march to the homogenization of Earth and an imbalance of ecology. When the domestic bees go to monocultured fields - they use chemicals on the plants most every place you go - and it's their business to keep the bees alive. The bee keepers lose money when their bees die so losing money is a big issue to them

TL;DR: Bees around the world are not at risk unless they are domesticated honey bees forced to work on monocultured and chemical sprayed fields.

Where I live the bees are not dying, the worst thing that can happen for an apiarist is that their colony swarms away and they have to go find and capture the bees
edit on 12-5-2014 by Philippines because: added a bit more clarification



posted on May, 12 2014 @ 04:22 AM
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edit: dreaded double post. thanks lag.
edit on 12-5-2014 by Philippines because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2014 @ 04:35 AM
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a reply to: Philippines

I'm agreeing with you.

Harvard spent how much money figuring out that pesticides kill insects, like honeybees?

This idiocy has no boundaries, does it.

NWO wants to kill most of the human population - why not start with food? which honeybees are needed.

To quote a "nwo bull# slogan" - The Circle of Life.

Thank you, you #ing disney bull# artists.



posted on May, 12 2014 @ 10:42 AM
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One of the aspects is that a bee is a social insect. It and its colony need each other to function correctly in the role they play in their environment.

Ok, so the poison does not kill the bee. (Which is what most studies have shown.) But even with other animals and people, we certainly know that poisons can be detrimental to your health without killing you. So you end up with a bee that doesn't die outright, but is wigged out, not feeling healthy, and therefore is more likely to be easily agitated. The bee which needs to be social to thrive ends up no longer in the mood for it. (Understandable if you're feeling sick, tired, and cranky.) So it leaves the hive. It doesn't die directly from poison, but rather from starvation or exposure while trying to live on its own.

Also without such poison in the bee's environment, the behavior where sick bees leave on their own would normally be a good thing. It works out such that bees with illness or disease separate themselves from the hive which prevents further infection of the colony as a whole.

So what happens when practically the whole hive does that? You end up with CCD.

At least now there is better proof of it. The mechanism being less of an unknown puts the ball in the court of those practicing agriculture and commercial epiculture. (Stop using the insecticide or lending bees to farms that use it, etc.)



posted on May, 12 2014 @ 12:01 PM
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a reply to: R_Clark

Bees aren't the only thing in decline. I've noticed less and less birds too. Used to see all sorts 15/20 years ago but since the "Authorities" decided they wanted to build more homes and shops in London, they have been in decline. Not only that but most homeowners around here go and concrete their backyards and take the trees and plants out of it...



posted on May, 12 2014 @ 06:27 PM
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a reply to: R_Clark

Scientists have the answer! (extreme sarcasm)




No need to worry about how much insecticide you are using with these bad boys!! (of course it might not bode well for people eating fruits and vegetables.)
edit on 12-5-2014 by openminded2011 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2014 @ 06:50 PM
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I've known this for at least 3 years now.
Surely if I know the petrochemical companies know too yet continue pushing their killer bee poison.
I haven't seen a single honeybee this spring and my yard is full of flowers.
They have already screwed us to an unimaginable degree.
ALL of nature will be affected.

These are madmen and psychopaths selling this stuff.
Our capacity to inflict suffering on ourselves is amazing.



posted on May, 12 2014 @ 07:05 PM
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a reply to: R_Clark

2 I envy those who are dead and gone; they are better off than those who are still alive. 3 But better off than either are those who have never been born, who have never seen the injustice that goes on in this world. 4 I have also learned why people work so hard to succeed: it is because they envy the things their neighbors have. But it is useless. It is like chasing the wind.


Fear not- The end is near.





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