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New Chronology

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posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 12:14 PM
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Harte

punkinworks10
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Hi stormdancer,
Have you read Mike Baillies "Exodus to Arthur"?
If you haven't and aren't familiar with Baillie's work, he is a dendochronologist, tree ring dating expert. He and other researchers have built a very robust climate chronology.
Their work and the work of several independent groups, working on various Greenland ice cores, have pinned down the date window for the eruption of thera and the exodus to 1628bc + or - 20 years.

That's only a corroboration of a previously known date.
Link

Harte


TY




posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 12:39 PM
link   

Harte

punkinworks10
reply to post by Stormdancer777
 


Hi stormdancer,
Have you read Mike Baillies "Exodus to Arthur"?
If you haven't and aren't familiar with Baillie's work, he is a dendochronologist, tree ring dating expert. He and other researchers have built a very robust climate chronology.
Their work and the work of several independent groups, working on various Greenland ice cores, have pinned down the date window for the eruption of thera and the exodus to 1628bc + or - 20 years.

That's only a corroboration of a previously known date.
Link

Harte

Sorry Harte ,
But your quoted source is the corroborating work, as Baillie published n 1999 and most od his work was done in early nineties and late eighties.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 01:04 PM
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Bronze Age Collapse: Pollen Study Highlights Late Bronze Age Drought
www.biblicalarchaeology.org... ht/



It was a cataclysm of immense proportions: Near the end of the 13th century B.C.E., the great Bronze Age civilizations of the Aegean and Near East suddenly collapsed. In the latter part of the Late Bronze Age (c. 1400–1200 B.C.E.), Mycenaean civilization flourished in Greece and Crete. The Hittites controlled most of Anatolia and northern Syria from their capital at Hattusa. The Egyptian New Kingdom ruled not only in the Nile Valley but also in Palestine and southern Syria. Commerce flowed over trade routes that crisscrossed both land and sea. A late-14th-century B.C.E. ship excavated off the Uluburun promontory in southern Turkey, for example, carried cargo from Cyprus, Canaan, Egypt, Anatolia and Mycenaean Greece. A century later, all these civilizations had begun to unravel. Cities burned, trade became almost nonexistent, and large groups of people migrated from one place to another.

The Bronze Age collapse was swift and sudden, ushering in a so-called “Dark Age” of decreased literacy, population and technology in much of the Eastern Mediterranean. However, as Thomas Fuller wrote in A Pisgah Sight of Palestine in 1650, “It is always darkest just before the Day dawneth.” The power vacuum and increased migration surely played a role in the emergence of the Biblical Israelites and classical Greeks.

But what caused the Bronze Age collapse? Scholars have proposed a combination of factors including marauding Sea Peoples, plagues and earthquakes leading to a so-called “systems collapse,” in which complex societal networks broke down under mounting interregional economic or demographic pressures. Some see Homer’s Iliad as an illustration of the warfare that brought about (or occurred in the wake of) the Late Bronze Age collapse.





A recent study of pollen grains in sediment cores beneath the Sea of Galilee and the Dead Sea provides a new view of the Bronze Age collapse. The research, published in Tel Aviv: Journal of the Institute of Archaeology of Tel Aviv University, suggests that drought may have played a major factor leading to the Bronze Age collapse. Every plant produces a distinct pollen print (see below), and the recent studies show a decrease in trees requiring a great deal of water and an increase in the cultivation of dry-climate trees, such as olive trees, during the period between 1250 and 1100 B.C.E. Tel Aviv University professor Israel Finkelstein told the New York Times that pollen counts taken every 40 years are the “highest resolution yet in this region.” When compared with pollen data from Anatolia, Cyprus, Syria and the Nile Delta, the new studies suggest a broader climate change across the Eastern Mediterranean around the time of the Bronze Age collapse.



posted on Apr, 16 2014 @ 06:07 PM
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punkinworks10
Sorry Harte ,
But your quoted source is the corroborating work, as Baillie published n 1999 and most od his work was done in early nineties and late eighties.

Thanks, my bad.

The C14 date corroborates Baillie's, and further refines it.

Harte



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