It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

109: Meitneranium, Mt

page: 1
0

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 05:04 PM
link   
I study in chemistry, and I have been researching a lot of the elements that make things work the way they do. If you didn't know, an element is a base material that cannot be broken down into another substance. lol

Well, I'm curious about Meitneranium, or 109. This is one of the many elements that have been artificially created in a lab. It was discovered in the year 1982. Well, this element has only been known to be present for a short time of 14-Thousanths of a second. I don't really know how you can call it an element, because it breaks down so fast, that there couldn't possibly be a way to test and observed it. I'm not sure if producing it in a large batch would work, but I don't think it would make a difference.




posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 05:27 PM
link   
Elements can be broken down into smaller "substances" if you define a substance as particles.

Most elements over Uranium decay at a very fast rate. They are still elements though. They just aren't Natural Elements.

The decay rate would remain the same even for a large amount. A lot of the higher elements that decay this fast are pretty much usless.



posted on Nov, 24 2004 @ 05:40 PM
link   
It's still an element.

Elements are not 'things that don't break down' - elements are collections of protons, neutrons, and electrons. An element differs according to its number of protons.

If you manage to create a material composed of 109 protons and however many neutrons, it is element 109, whether it decays into other elements rapidly or not.



new topics
 
0

log in

join