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Roman literature.

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posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 10:31 AM
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How is the literature of Ancient Rome, in its different eras and genres, indebted to the literature of Ancient Greece? Was it just borrowed?




posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 10:47 AM
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If you look up "Roman Literature Wiki", you come up with this:

Roman Literature Wiki

It appears that while Roman literature was written in Latin, rather than Greek, the Romans did indeed borrow stories and Gods and such from the Greeks.

Eta: Ovid and Virgil are the best that Latin literature has to offer, IMO.
edit on 10-3-2014 by DustbowlDebutante because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 02:30 PM
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Why do you consistently keep posting your college questions on here?

No offense, but you should do your own work.

You've made several other threads with other questions.

Discuss it with your tutor if you're struggling rather than asking us.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by Kram09
 


Dang, I didn't know I was helping someone with their homework. Had I known, I would have let the OP do his own research.

I have a minor in Latin, so I get excited about all things Latin and Roman, and I thought this person was just curious.

OP, go do your own research. It shouldn't be too hard, since I've given you a starting point. In the future, instead of asking questions on ATS, go to your library or hit up google. Personally, I don't think google can hold a candle to an actual old book when it comes to Latin literature.



posted on Mar, 10 2014 @ 03:36 PM
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RobFox
How is the literature of Ancient Rome, in its different eras and genres, indebted to the literature of Ancient Greece? Was it just borrowed?


Dude, read some and then you'll not only be able to answer your own question but you'll be that little bit richer too. As said above, Virgil and Ovid are great when it comes to story telling, but if Histories and Annals are more your thing go for the eminently readable Caesar and Tacitus - Caesar is particularly great as an intro to propaganda.
You could also read Greek authors writing about the Romans in their ascendancy - Plutarch is awesome for his accounts of paired Lives, often scurrilous and gossipy; but for me, Polybius' account of The Punic Wars is the best History book i have ever read.

So.... Get Reading.



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