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Question about dark matter.

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posted on Mar, 4 2014 @ 11:15 PM
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We know space is expanding at an accelerating rate between objects that are at a great distance from each other. We also believe that dark matter keeps the stars in a galaxy from being flung out into intergalactic space.

My question is, could it be that the metric expansion of space, combined with gravity, is what actually keeps the stars in a galaxy from not being flung out into intergalactic space? Do formulas discount this?
edit on 4-3-2014 by smithjustinb because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 4 2014 @ 11:45 PM
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It's gravity that keeps galaxies together. Is that what you're asking? Perhaps dark matter accounts for the gravity needed to keep galaxies together.



posted on Mar, 4 2014 @ 11:55 PM
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reply to post by Toromos
 


So you're saying that gravity could be dark matter since the graviton has not been observed yet. Is that what you're saying?



posted on Mar, 4 2014 @ 11:59 PM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 


They don't really know anything about the universe dark matter is a hypothetical place holder to describe an unseen force they dont understand in order to discover what it really is that exist in empty space.

Think further outside the box and incorporate consciousness into the observation of what it is that composes the "space" between things and the ulterior forces of matter that essentially hold it all together.
edit on 3/4/2014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:02 AM
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reply to post by Toromos
 


Gravity is an unknown.

Gravity could be something completely out of our realm of understanding as we know things to exist.

Hell for all we know when we discover what it really is it may change everything but who really knows?

I know none of us really do.



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Interesting concept. I never thought about it that way.



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:04 AM
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reply to post by brazenalderpadrescorpio
 


Of which observation?



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:05 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Have you ever read what the Ra material says about spiritual mass? It's really interesting.



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Your observation that consciousness could be dark matter. I find that concept intriguing.


edit on bWed, 05 Mar 2014 00:07:16 -0600am63America/Chicago3amWednesday05America/Chicago by brazenalderpadrescorpio because: grammar



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:06 AM
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reply to post by brazenalderpadrescorpio
 


I don't think I'm saying that. From what I understand dark matter is a form of matter that we have not been able to detect. Because it is matter, however, it does create gravitational attraction like visible matter. It's my understanding that dark matter is currently needed as a hypothesis precisely because the visible matter that we can see cannot account for various instances of gravitational attraction, especially at the large scale of galaxies attracting each other in galaxy clusters.



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:09 AM
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smithjustinb
My question is, could it be that the metric expansion of space, combined with gravity, is what actually keeps the stars in a galaxy from not being flung out into intergalactic space? Do formulas discount this?
The metric expansion of space makes things appear to fly apart.

You seem to be asking if this property of space that makes it look like things are flying apart is what's causing the stars in a galaxy to not be flung out into intergalactic space?

Or did I misunderstand the question?

You said "combined with gravity", so if we ignore the metric expansion of space and this "combined with" part of the question, yes it's thought that gravity is what keeps the stars from being flung off. If not gravity from dark matter, maybe some kind of modified gravity theory might explain the galactic rotation curves, but those modified gravity ideas have some problems with explaining the bullet cluster observations.



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:09 AM
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reply to post by Toromos
 


Do you think it's possible that dark matter could be the graviton?



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:10 AM
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People suppose dark matter because more gravity is needed in the galaxy to overcome the centrifugal force of the galaxy's rotation than is observed in regular matter. The matter that we see does not have enough mass to overcome the centrifugal force of the galaxies rotation in order to stay in tact, so scientists came up with dark matter as a way to explain it.

My question is, "Could the metric expansion of space supplement dark matter as an explanation."



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:12 AM
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reply to post by brazenalderpadrescorpio
 


They dont understand the "forces" and how they tie together. I dont either but im at least willing to admit the truth which gives me an edge against my competitors.

Theoretically speaking maybe consciousness isnt exactly dark matter but its not not dark matter either.

What force ties it all together and makes it observable to whatever is experiencing it?

Don't you think its funny how everything follows a set of rules, almost like there's an authority governing the rules of the universe?



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:13 AM
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reply to post by brazenalderpadrescorpio
 





Do you think it's possible that dark matter could be the graviton?


Do you think its possible that sound has something to do with gravity?



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:14 AM
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smithjustinb
My question is, "Could the metric expansion of space supplement dark matter as an explanation."
No it's exactly opposite of what's needed for an explanation.

Metric expansion of space explains why things seem to be flying apart. We need the opposite effect, some kind of explanation of why stars are NOT flying apart in galactic rotation



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:15 AM
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reply to post by brazenalderpadrescorpio
 


I don't think so. The graviton is a hypothetical particle that explains the force of gravity from a quantum mechanical point of view. It is a force mediating particle. It would therefore be massless, similar to photons as being the force mediating particle for the electro-magnetic force. Dark matter has mass, and thus would interact with gravitons. We just can't detect dark matter at this point, but only observe it's gravitation effects on other visible matter bodies.



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:16 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


We don't know enough to know weather or not there is literally a metric expansion of space or not.

Their just observations...

Ok ok, calculations but we have no idea what were looking at to be perfectly honest. Its ALL hypothetical.
edit on 3/5/2014 by onequestion because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:16 AM
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I thought gravity was caused by the twisting of time space by massive objects. That's always been my understanding.

I actually like the thought that the expAntion of the universe causes an opposing contracting force. That we register as dark matter... Hell that might fix the problem with both dark matter and energy.



posted on Mar, 5 2014 @ 12:17 AM
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reply to post by Toromos
 


Show conclusive evidence to support your claim that dark matter has mass and how they discovered it.



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