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The Story of the Higgs Boson, as Told by Higgs Himself [Video]

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posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 11:49 AM
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What creates mass? what makes different particles have different mass?

"The idea Higgs pioneered, called the Higgs field, is crucial to our understanding of space. The Higgs field is everywhere, it's something that even in the emptiest vacuum of space has an effect, it gives you mass. So I think Higgs actually deserves credit for being one of the people that said, 'space is stuff, it has properties in it that are intrinsic, that you can't get rid of, you can't turn them off.'"


video grab - Peter Higgs present day


Scientific American: The Story of the Higgs Boson, as Told by Higgs Himself [Video]

Unable to embed the video but here's a short link (requires Flash 9):
PBS Video 2160652230

from the video

I don't think anyone seriously doubts we will see it. Certainly, if we don't that will be an extremely bizarre outcome.


After the recent expectation the Higgs boson would be found there was a lull in the excitement of the idea. Glad to hear Physicist still fully expect to find it!


Also, on PBS (in America, maybe elsewhere?), The Fabric of The Cosmos: What is Space?
November 2nd, 9/8central



edit on 31-10-2011 by Thermo Klein because: added a few things



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 12:04 PM
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sounds like they are looking for the ether again =) just changed the name. I hope they do, i've been saying space isn't empty before it was common knowledge, if you can even say that =/

not much more to say on the subject, I've been following the whole LHC thing for quite a while now and this is the first time it hit me what they are actually after here.

ed: video links are 'experiencing technical difficulties' unfortunatly.
edit on 31/10/2011 by whatsinaname because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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as a similar upcoming TV show, Brian Greene's The Elegent Universe will be on Nova, on PBS, November 9th. If you haven't seen it, DO! It's one of the best books written on String Theory, in league with Hawkings' Brief History of Time.



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 12:09 PM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


I loved that video. Very good. I remember reading a quote from the main CERN site a few years ago that quoted one scientist as saying this: The Higgs Boson would be the last particle and wave found and would demonstrate streaming data from another dimension. The quote was removed. I wish I had saved the site.

It is interesting to notice that light is both a particle and wave. All particles have an associated wave. In the Bible, God said let there be light. The Father is associated with light. The Son is the Word, which is wave. The Holy Spirit is consciousness. Put these together and you get the one person of God, projected into material reality in the form of consciousness, particle and wave. Our bodies are particles and waves with consciousness. This makes us a projection of God in an image. It says it two ways in Genesis. We are 'in' the image. We are the image of God.

Genesis 1:27

27 So God created mankind in his own image,
in the image of God he created them;
male and female he created them.



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by whatsinaname
 


just tried the Scientific American link - video is half way down it - and it is working well for me. Hope it works out! Just a short 5 minute video on the basics and his story of how it came about. His first submission of the idea got rejected, then his triumphant presentation of the idea at Princeton. Nothing new or profound if you've followed the Higgs idea.



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by SuperiorEd
 



Genesis 1:14 And God said, “Let there be lights in the vault of the sky to separate the day from the night, and let them serve as signs to mark sacred times, and days and years, 15 and let them be lights in the vault of the sky to give light on the earth.” And it was so. 16 God made two great lights—the greater light to govern the day and the lesser light to govern the night. He also made the stars. 17 God set them in the vault of the sky to give light on the earth, 18 to govern the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness. And God saw that it was good. 19 And there was evening, and there was morning—the fourth day.


Ironically, you need to have had a supernova in order to create the complex particles found on earth - utterly disproving the entire idea that Earth came first. We didn't....

I used to be Christian and gave it up because the Bible simply doesn't add up. Kinda saddens me when people work SO HARD to make their chosen belief match something that is provable: Science.

so, point: counter point. Let's please discuss any more about Religion (entirely off topic) via messages or a different thread.



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 12:43 PM
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Originally posted by Thermo Klein
reply to post by SuperiorEd
 



Genesis 1:14 And God said, “Let there be lights in the vault of the sky to separate the day from the night, and let them serve as signs to mark sacred times, and days and years, 15 and let them be lights in the vault of the sky to give light on the earth.” And it was so. 16 God made two great lights—the greater light to govern the day and the lesser light to govern the night. He also made the stars. 17 God set them in the vault of the sky to give light on the earth, 18 to govern the day and the night, and to separate light from darkness. And God saw that it was good. 19 And there was evening, and there was morning—the fourth day.


Ironically, you need to have had a supernova in order to create the complex particles found on earth - utterly disproving the entire idea that Earth came first. We didn't....

I used to be Christian and gave it up because the Bible simply doesn't add up. Kinda saddens me when people work SO HARD to make their chosen belief match something that is provable: Science.

so, point: counter point. Let's please discuss any more about Religion (entirely off topic) via messages or a different thread.


Sure. No religion talk. But, I will counter your point on the supernova and particles on earth. The Derac Relativistic Quantum Wave Equation demonstrates that particle and wave duality is the collision of matter and anti-matter. We are parallel to another universe in opposite. It has been suggested by many that the 'now' of time we experience is the projection point between these two coming together by dimensionality and parallel universes. We are really unaware at this point to really know theory from fact. There are many possibilities that would lead to ancient knowledge being the truth of the matter so to speak. The possibility should not be discounted. A created reality is being suggested more and more by mainstream science.

Back to the Higgs Bosson. Science already relates the new wave and force to dimensional space. Higgs states that it may enter and exit from another dimension. It is noted in the link below.

LINK




edit on 31-10-2011 by SuperiorEd because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 04:13 PM
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reply to post by SuperiorEd
 


I like Dirac's work and feel he was definitely showing some genius, ahead of his time. But I think the basically quantum and String Theory ideas he proposed were overexagerated and expanded on to create the idea of an alternate and opposite reality to ours.

Quantum theory accounts for the charge balancing, including the anti-matter and/or zero-charge particles. I don't see that Quantum theory, String Theory or similar, about 70 years later than Dirac?, lead to the alternate-opposite reality though.

as a side note, I don't discount the idea of a Grand Creator(s). I just don't choose Christianity with it's one myth-based book as the guide to understanding such a Being. Sorry if I was a little harsh in full-stop calling it off topic - I appreciate the conversation and these subjects are rather intimately combined.



edit on 31-10-2011 by Thermo Klein because: added a word, changed spelling



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 04:14 PM
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Originally posted by Thermo Klein
After the recent expectation the Higgs boson would be found there was a lull in the excitement of the idea. Glad to hear Physicist still fully expect to find it!
Yes the video does indeed say they expect to find it, but I think that's masking the actual results of the search for the Higgs boson.

Research has already excluded the energy range they thought it would most likely be in, and now there aren't many options left. So yes they are still looking, but most of the "places" (energy levels) looked at so far haven't turned up anything:

The Latest Word on the Higgs from the Mumbai Conference Posted on August 22, 2011


The most interesting point here is that ATLAS and CMS [crudely] taken together exclude all regions for the Standard Model Higgs particle except

below 145 GeV,
the range 288-296 GeV, and
above 464 GeV.

Since precision measurements of other quantities in nature indirectly make the region above 464 GeV very unlikely, and even that small window around 290 is probably excluded when the two experimental results are combined properly, we are probably down to the region 115 — 145 GeV for the Standard Model Higgs.


news.softpedia.com...

Experts told attendants that these results are 95 percent certain. This means that there is still a 5 percent chance the particle is hiding within this energy range, having eluded capture by the most advanced experiment ever constructed in the world.

“We have the Higgs cornered, and if the LHC continues to perform as it has over the past several months, by early next year the Higgs won't have much room to hide anymore,” added University of Oregon Knight Professor of Natural Sciences and physicist Jim Brau, in an email.
So it's running out of hiding places, and the longer the LHC runs without it being discovered, the less and less likely it becomes that it will be found in the fewer and fewer remaining hiding places.Even if it is found in one of the remaining hiding places, like below 130GeV, that may pose problems for the standard model as I don't think the standard model expected to find it in that range:

Higgs excluded from 130 GeV to 480 GeV



This is an “illustrative” combination of the ATLAS and CMS Higgs searches which appears to be based on the data presented at lepton-Photon-2011. If you look carefully at where the black line crosses the 95% confidence level limit you will see that it excludes the standard model Higgs between 130 GeV and 480 GeV.

A Higgs below 130 GeV disfavours the standard model on its own because of vacuum instability.

So energy levels of 130-480GeV are excluded, above 480GeV is extremely unlikely, and below 130GeV disfavors the standard model.

Where does that leave us? With a much different perception than one might get from watching that PBS video.
edit on 31-10-2011 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 04:23 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur
Experts told attendants that these results are 95 percent certain. This means that there is still a 5 percent chance the particle is hiding within this energy range


Great info overall!

I would like to point out that many experiments use 95% as the delineating mark as to whether something is "significant". If something falls in the non-significant portion it is flatly refered to as having happened by chance. If all their work to date falls in the 95% range then it means it's proven absolutely nothing, because any result may have happened "by chance".



posted on Oct, 31 2011 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 

The 95% / 5% can have different implications...in some cases what you said is true, but I don't think it applies in this case.

In this case as stated, it means they are 95% confident it's not in that range.

That means there's still a 5% chance it could turn up there. So from that perspective, you could say if there's still a 5% chance left it could be found in one of those ranges, we haven't really proven absolutely it's not there.

But scientists do deal in probabilities, yes that's a fact of life and they are rarely 100% certain.



posted on Nov, 1 2011 @ 11:22 AM
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reply to post by Thermo Klein
 


You are touting Supersymmetry and String Theory as great things to watch at the same time CERN in nailing the coffin lid shut? Quantum Chromodynamics is dead in the water. People should have known they were being taken for a ride when they were told quantum spin is a non-physical spin.

I liked Brian Greene's PBS show a lot, I think I've sat through the whole thing twice. Unfortunately, the deeper you dig into the math, the weaker these theories look. Quantum physics has always had serious technical issues with the math and string theory and the like do nothing to fix this. All they offer is further abstractions and misdirection.

In the 20th century, these mathematicians and neo-physicists believed that they created the world with their math. In the 21st century they will see the efficiency gained by accepting that you don't get to pick and choose reality.




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